Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
2
46th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Index
Message of the president
SBFTE Board of Directors
Past Board of Directors
Committees
Financial Support
Useful information
Satellite Meetings
Histórico Prêmio José Ribeiro do Valle
Finalistas Prêmio José Ribeiro do Valle – 2015
Program at a Glance
Scientific Program
Sunday 27/09/2015
Monday 28/09/2015
Tuesday 29/09/2015
Wednesday 30/09/15
Thursday 01/10/15
Poster Session 1 – 29/09/2015 (Odd Numbers)
01. Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology
02. Neuropharmacology
03. Psychopharmacology
04. Inflammation and Immunopharmacology
05. Pain and Nociception Pharmacology
06. Cardiovascular and Renal Pharmacology
07. Endocrine, Reproductive and Urogenital Pharmacology
08. Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Pharmacology
09. Natural Products and Toxinology
10. Cancer Pharmacology
11. Pharmacokinetics and Toxicology
12. Pharmacogenomics, Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Pharmacology
13. Drug Discovery and Development
14. Pharmacology Education and Technology
15. Pharmacology: Others
Poster Session 2 – 01/10/2015 (Even Numbers)
01. Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology
02. Neuropharmacology
03. Psychopharmacology
04. Inflammation and Immunopharmacology
05. Pain and Nociception Pharmacology
06. Cardiovascular and Renal Pharmacology
07. Endocrine, Reproductive and Urogenital Pharmacology
08. Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Pharmacology
09. Natural Products and Toxinology
10. Cancer Pharmacology
11. Pharmacokinetics and Toxicology
12. Pharmacogenomics, Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Pharmacology
13. Drug Discovery and Development
15. Pharmacology: Others
Lecture abstracts
Courses:
Conferences
Symposia
Index of Authors
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
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3
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
4
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Message of the president
2015 SBFTE Congress
A moment of celebration and reflection on our future as pharmacologists and as a
Scientific Society
The 47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology Experimental Therapeutics will take place from
September 28 – October 01, 2015, in the Hotel Monte Real Convention Center, Águas de Lindóia,
São Paulo, when SBFTE celebrates its 49th Anniversary.
The Congress’ central theme is Emerging Challenges in Drug Discovery and Therapy The scientific
program was set up through the outstanding hard work of the Scientific Committee in assembling
the final Congress Program, mostly taking into consideration the suggestions received from SBFTE’s
members. More than 80 speakers, among them 18 international researchers, with outstanding
expertise in the field of pharmacology will present conferences and talks over the course of a few
days, covering cutting-edge presentations of new and original scientific research. We also would
like to highlight the sessions dedicated to topics related to research and graduate education in
Pharmacology in Brazil, with representative speakers from Brazilian Research Funding Agencies
(CAPES, CNPq, among others); we plan to discuss both the scientific background of
research/teaching activities, as well as their political and economic context.
A special tribute will be paid to Dr. Jorge A. Guimarães not only for his outstanding contribution
to Brazilian science, but also for the years of dedication and commitment as CAPES Director. The
Sergio Ferreira Lecture will be given by the distinguished speaker Dr. Frederico G. Graeff (USP-RP).
Representative members of International Scientific Societies will present conferences and also join
us in a round table discussion on Pharmacology in Latin America: Dr. Sam Enna (USA, President of
the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, IUPHAR) and Dr. René Delgado (Cuba,
President of the Cuban Society of Pharmacology). Among the estimated 600 participants, we
expect to have attendees from Latin America, as part of our efforts to stimulate networking and
cooperation among pharmacologists from different countries in Latin America.
The Hotel Convention Center will offer attendees a unique environment for networking, exchange of
scientific ideas and social interaction. Posters will be displayed during the entire Congress close to
the areas dedicated to coffee-breaks and sponsor Exhibitors. The SBFTE Board of Directors,
Executive Council and the SBFTE Jovem will meet and welcome students, young investigators and
junior faculty members, in the first day of the Congress. The sessions Meet the Pharmacologist
and the Round Table on Seeking a research career in the Brazilian Pharmaceutical Industry: Novel
opportunities for young investigators organized by SBFTE Jovem will provide an important space
for discussions on career and professional development.
Awards sponsored by SBFTE’s corporate partners will be presented to selected student and young
investigator attendees present at the Congress closing session. Also, the winners of the Jose
Ribeiro do Valle Award (SBFTE/Biolab Sanus Farmacêutica) and best poster presentations will be
announced. Finally the commemorative 50th anniversary SBFTE logo will be unveiled during the
Closing Session, launching the activities of “The Year of Pharmacology” in 2016. A farewell
celebration will follow this announcement and conclude another edition of the Congress.
We are all deeply indebted to all SBFTE members, Colleagues and Collaborators for all of their
hard work in assembling this Congress.
We look forward to welcoming you, members and first timers, in Águas de Lindóia. We count on
you to make this Congress a success.
Maria Christina Avellar
SBFTE President, 2015-2017
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
5
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
6
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
SBFTE Board of Directors
2015-2017
President: Maria Christina W. Avellar (Unifesp-EPM)
Vice Presidente: Letícia V. Costa Lotufo (USP)
Executive Director: Fernando de Q. Cunha (FMRP-USP)
Administrative Director: Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva (Fiocruz)
Financial Director: Rosely Oliveira Godinho (UNIFESP/EPM)
Deliberative Council
Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM)
Emiliano de Oliveira Barreto (UFAL)
François G. Noël (UFRJ)
Mauro M. Teixeira (UFMG) (past president)
Teresa Cristina T. Dalla Costa (UFRGS)
Thereza Christina Barja-Fidalgo (UERJ)
Thiago Mattar Cunha (USP)
Financial Council
Full Members:
Emer Suavinho Ferro (ICB-USP)
Roberto Cesar P. Lima Junior (UFC)
Vinicius de Frias Carvalho (Fiocruz)
Substitute Members:
Daniele da Gloria de Souza (UFMG)
Juliana Geremias Chichorro (UFPR)
Bagnólia Araújo da Silva (UFPB)
Past Board of Directors
1966-1981
1982-1983
President: Maurício Rocha e Silva
Vice-President: José Ribeiro do Valle
General Secretary: Alexandre Pinto Corrado
First Secretary: Lauro Sollero
Treasurer: Hanna A. Rothschild
President: Alexandre Pinto Corrado
Vice-President: Aron Jurkiewicz
General Secretary: Sergio H. Ferreira
First Secretary: Roberto Soares de Moura
Treasurer: Adolfo M. Rothschild
1984-1985
1986-1987
President: Aron Jurkiewicz
Vice-President: Roberto Soares de Moura
General Secretary: Sergio H. Ferreira
First Secretary: João Palermo Neto
Treasurer: Therezinha Bandieira Paiva
President: Sergio H. Ferreira
Vice-President: Guilherme Suarez-Kurtz
General Secretary: João Garcia Leme
First Secretary: Fernando Morgan de A. Correa
Treasurer: William A. do Prado
1988-1989
1990-1991
President: Sergio H. Ferreira
Vice-President: Guilherme Suarez-Kurtz
General Secretary: João Garcia Leme
First Secretary: Fernando Morgan de A. Correa
Treasurer: William A. do Prado
President: Renato S. B. Cordeiro
Vice-President: João B. Calixto
General Secretary: Regina P. Markus
First Secretary: Krishnamurti M. Carvalho
Treasurer: Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva
1992-1993
1994-1995
President: Renato S. B. Cordeiro
Vice-President: João B. Calixto
General Secretary: Giles A. Rae
Secretary: Manoel Odorico de Moraes Filho
Treasurer: Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva
President: João B Calixto
Vice-President: William A. do Prado
General Secretary: Giles A. Rae
Secretary: Manoel Odorico de Moraes Filho
Treasurer: Jamil Assreuy Filho
1996-1997
1998-1999
President: João B Calixto
Vice-President: Maria Cristina O. Salgado
General Secretary: Jamil Assreuy
Secretary: Giles A. Rae
Treasurer: Carlos A. Flores
President: Maria Cristina O. Salgado
Vice-President: Regina P. Markus
General Secretary: Gustavo Ballejo
Secretary: José Geraldo Mill
Treasurer: Jamil Assreuy
2000-2001
2002-2003
President: Antonio José Lapa
Vice-President: Roberto Soares de Moura
General Secretary: Caden Souccar
Secretary: Francisco Ruy Capaz
Treasurer: Thereza C. M. de Lima
President: Giles A. Rae
Vice-President: Manassés C. Fonteles
General Secretary: Edson Antunes
Secretary: François G. Noël
Treasurer: Mauro M. Teixeira
2004-2005
2006-2008
President: Giles A. Rae (UFSC)
Vice-President: Regina P. Markus (USP)
General Secretary: François G. Noël (UFRJ)
Secretary: Isac A. Medeiros (UFAL)
Treasurer: Mauro M. Teixeira (UFMG)
President: Regina P. Markus (USP)
Vice-President: Jamil Assreuy (UFSC)
General Secretary: Marco Aurélio Martins (Fiocruz)
Secretary: Mauro M. Teixeira (UFMG)
Treasurer: Maria Elisabeth A. de Moraes (UFC)
2009-2011
2012-2014
President: Jamil Assreuy (UFSC)
Vice-President: Mauro M. Teixeira (UFMG)
General Secretary: Rosely O. Godinho (UNIFESP-EPM)
Primeiro-Secretary: Teresa Cristina T. Dalla Costa (UFRGS)
Treasurer: Ronaldo de A. Ribeiro (UFC)
President: Mauro M. Teixeira (UFMG)
Vice-President: Fernando de Q. Cunha (USP)
Executive Director: Letícia Costa Lotufo (UFC)
Adminsitrative Director: Yara Cury (Instituto Butantan)
Financial Director: Maria Christina W. de Avellar (Unifesp-EPM)
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
7
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
8
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Committees
Congress President
Maria Christina W. de Avellar
(Unifesp-EPM)
Organizing Committee
Maria Christina W. de Avellar
(Unifesp-EPM, Coordinator)
Letícia V. Costa Lotufo (USP)
Fernando de Q. Cunha (USP)
Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva
(Fiocruz)
Rosely O. Godinho (Unifesp-EPM)
Scientific Committee
François G. Noël (UFRJ, Coordinator)
Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM)
Letícia V. Costa Lotufo (USP)
Maria Christina W. de Avellar
(Unifesp-EPM)
Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva
(Fiocruz)
Teresa Cristina T. Dalla Costa
(UFRGS)
Abstract Evaluation Committee
Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva
(Coordinator, Fiocruz)
Ana Lucia de Aguiar Pires (Fiocruz)
Letícia V. Costa Lotufo (USP)
Rosely O. Godinho (Unifesp-EPM)
Fundraising Committee
Letícia V. Costa Lotufo (Coordinator,
USP)
Fernando de Q. Cunha (USP)
Regina P. Markus (USP)
SBFTE Young Trainee Committee
Erick J. R. Silva (Coordinator, UnespBotucatu)
Elisa Kawamoto (USP)
Juliano Quintella Dantas Rodrigues
(Unifesp-EPM)
Gilda Angela Neves (UFRJ)
Rafael de Morais Campos (Unicamp)
SBFTE Young Support Group
Andrana Calgarotto (Unicamp)
Enio Pacini (Unifesp-EPM)
Vanessa Moreira (Unifesp-EPM)
Poster Evaluation Committee
Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva
(Coordinator, Fiocruz)
Ana Lucia de Aguiar Pires (Fiocruz)
Letícia V. Costa Lotufo (USP)
Rosely O. Godinho (Unifesp-EPM)
José Ribeiro do Valle Award
Committee
Frederico G. Graeff (USP,
coordinator)
Daniela de Almeida Cabrini (UFPR)
Geanne Matos de Andrade (UFC)
Abstract Reviewers
Aleksander Roberto Zampronio
Ana Luisa Palhares de Miranda
Andre Sampaio Pupo
Andrea Grabe Guimaraes
Andressa Bernardi
Angela de Castro Resende
Bagnolia Araujo da Silva
Caden Souccar
Candida Aparecida Leite Kassuya
Catarina Segreti Porto
Claudia Lucia Martins Silva
Claudia Maria Padovan
Claudia Pessoa
Cristiano Ponte
Cristoforo Scavone
Dalton Valentim Vassallo
Daniela de Almeida Cabrini
Edson Antunes
Eduardo Vera Tibiriça
Emiliano Barreto
Emilio Luiz Streck
Fabio Coelho Amendoeira
Fernanda Carla Ferreira de Brito
Fernando Morgan de Aguiar Correa
Francisco Paumgarten
Francisco Silveira Guimaraes
Gilberto de Nucci
Giles Alexander Rae
Gloria Emilia Petto de Souza
Gustavo Ballejo
Hugo Caire Castro de Faria Neto
Isac Almeida de Medeiros
Jamil Assreuy
Janetti Nogueira Francischi
Jorge Luiz Mendonça Tributino
Jose Carlos Farias Alves Filho
José Eduardo da Silva-Santos
Jose Eduardo Tanus dos Santos
Josiane Neves
Juliano Ferreira
Letícia V. Costa Lotufo
Luis Eduardo Menezes Quintas
Lusiane Maria Bendhack
Luzineide Tinoco
Magda Fraguas Serra
Marcelo Nicolás Muscará
Marco Aurelio Martins
Maria das Graças M. O. Henriques
Maria Martha Campos
Newton Gonçalves de Castro
Patrícia Dias Fernandes
Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva
Patrícia Torres Bozza
Paulo de Assis Melo
Regina Pekelmann Markus
Regina Silva
Reinaldo Takahashi
Renato S. B. Cordeiro
Rita de Cassia Aleixo Tostes
Passaglia
Roberto Takashi Sudo
Ronaldo Albuquerque Ribeiro
Rosely Oliveira Godinho
Sandra Helena P. Farsky
Sandra Helena Penha de Oliveira
Soraia Katia Pereira Costa
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Stella Regina Zamuner
Steyner Côrtes
Thereza Christina Barja Fidalgo
Thiago Mattar Cunha
Valber da Silva Frutuoso
Valeria Monti Nascimento Cunha
Vanessa Pinho da Silva
Vinicius de Frias Carvalho
Waldiceu Aparecido Verri Junior
Yara Cury
Poster Reviewers
Agnaldo Bruno Chies
Albetiza Lobo Araújo
Aldeidia Oliveira
Alexandra Acco
Ana Carolina de C. Correia
Ana Luisa Palhares de Miranda
Andre Gustavo Calvano Bonavita
Andre Sampaio Pupo
Andressa Bernardi
Anna Paula Piovezan
Ariane Renno Brogliato
Bianca T. Ciambarella
Bibiana Verlindo de Araujo
Caden Souccar
Claudia Lucia Martins Silva
Cristiano Pontes
Cristina Antoniali
Elaine Cristina Gavioli
Elen Cristina Landucci
Elen Rizzi
Elisa Mitiko Kawamoto
Enilton Aparecido Camargo
Erick Jose Ramo Silva
Éverton Tenório de Souza
Fabio Coelho Amendoeira
Fausto Ferraris
Fernanda Regina de C. Almeida
Geisson Marcos Nardi
Gilberto de Nucci
Gilda Angela Neves
Helena Serra Azul Monteiro
Heloisa Helena Araujo Ferreira
Jamil Assreuy
Joelmir Lucena Veiga Silva
Joilson O. Martins
Luis Eduardo Menezes Quintas
Luisa Mota da Silva
Magda Fraguas Serra
Marcelo Nicolás Muscará
Maria Fernanda de P. Werner
Maria Martha Campos
Maribel Antonello Rubin
Maximiliano Ruben Ferrero
Patrícia Reckziegel
Regina Pekelmann Markus
Richardt Gama Landgraf
Rosana Camarini
Steyner Côrtes
Tatiana Paula Teixeira Ferreira
Teresa Dalla Costa
Thereza Christina M. de Lima
Vinicius de Frias Carvalho
9
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
10
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
SBFTE thanks the following organizations for supporting the
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education
Personnel (CAPES)
Financial Support
National Council for Scientific and Tecnological
Development
Financial Support
State of Rio de Janeiro Research Foundation
Financial Support
State of São Paulo Research Foundation
Financial Support
Biolab-Sanus-Farmaceutica
Financial support
José Ribeiro do Valle Award.
ADInstruments Brasil Com. Imp. e Assist. Técnicas de
Produtos Eletrônicos Ltda
Exhibitor and Registration Area Pens and Notepads
Alesco Ind e Com
Exhibitor
Biosystems
Registration Area Pens
GE Technologie
Exhibitor
Insight Equipamentos Ltda
Meeting Bags Folders
INCT-INOFAR
Exhibitor
Instrutecnica
Exhibitor
Meeting Bags Folder
Merck Group
Exhibitor
Symposium
Mind the Graph
Sarstedt Ltda
Exhibitor
Sciencelabor Equipamentos
Exhibitor
Thermo Fisher Scientific do Brasil
Exhibitor
Eventus Planejamento e Organização
Meeting Secretariat
eventus@eventus.com.br
http://www.eventus.com.br
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
11
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
12
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Useful information
Secretariat
Congress Secretariat will be open from 8h to 18h
Posters
 All posters should be on display for the duration of the conference (September 29 to October 01)
 All posters should be ready for display by 8:00 am on September 29.
 Poster presenters must be present at the poster on September 29 at 18h10-19h10 (ODD Numbers) and
October 01 at 10h00-11h00 (EVEN numbers) when posters will be viewed by Poster Evaluators
 Posters should be taken down only at the end of the Congress.
Certificates
The Certificates will be sent by email to the participants and lecturers in pdf.
Media Desk
Media desk will be open from 8h to 18h. Please, leave your material at Media Desk at least two hours before
your presentation. All rooms have data show. If you need any other equipment, please inform Media Desk as
soon as possible. Lecturers presenting talks at 8h00 should leave their material at the Media Desk
before the presentation.
the day
Badges
The use of badge is mandatory for all activities and circulation areas
Abstracts
Abstracts presented at the poster session will be available at SBFTE site
http://www.sbfte.org.br
Download our app at:
http://www.sbfte.org.br/baixar-aplicativo-sbfte/
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
13
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
14
46th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Satellite Meetings
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
15
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretariat
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
16
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Histórico Prêmio José Ribeiro do Valle
O Prêmio José Ribeiro do Valle, concedido anualmente pela Sociedade Brasileira de
Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental, foi instituído em 1998 em parceria com a Eli
Lilly do Brasil. Esta parceria vigorou até 2006 e, a partir de 2009, o prêmio passou a ser
patrocinado pela Biolab-Sanus Farmacêutica. Este prêmio objetiva identificar e premiar
jovens investigadores (até 35 anos) coautores principais dos cinco melhores trabalhos
submetidos para apresentação no Congresso Brasileiro de Farmacologia daquele ano e
inscritos ao prêmio. Os finalistas apresentam seus trabalhos na forma de Comunicação
Oral e são arguidos, em sessão pública especial, realizada durante o congresso, por
Comissão Julgadora (3 membros) constituída por pesquisadores seniores, especialistas nas
diferentes áreas da Farmacologia. Nestes 16 anos da vigência do prêmio, os seguintes concorrentes
obtiveram o primeiro lugar:
1998 – Maria Martha Campos (UFSC – Orientador: João Batista Calixto)
1999 – José Eduardo da Silva Santos (UFSC – Orientador: Jamil Assreuy)
2000 – Ana Paula Villela Dantas (ICB-USP Orientador: Maria Helena Catelli de Carvalho)
2001 – Liliam Fernandes (ICB-USP Orientador: Maria Helena Catelli de Carvalho)
2002 – Isaias Gleizer (ICB-USP Orientador: Cristoforo Scavone)
2003 – Juliano Ferreira (UFSC – Orientador: João Batista Calixto)
2004 – João Alfredo de Moraes (UERJ – Orientador: Thereza Christina Barja-Fidalgo)
2005 – Tiago Chiavegatti (Unifesp – Orientador: Rosely O. Godinho)
2006 – Ana Letícia G. Cabral Maragno (FMRP-USP – Orientador: Marcelo Damário Gomes)
2007 – Maria Fernanda de Paula Werner (UFSC – Giles A. Rae)
2008 – Ana Luiza Andrade de Paula Lopes (Unifesp – Orientador: Rosely O. Godinho)
2009 – Silvio Manfredo Vieira (FMRP-USP – Orientador: Fernando de Q. Cunha)
2010 – Vanessa Olzon Zambelli (Instituto Butantan – Orientador: Yara Cury)
2011 – Tatiana Paula Teixeira Ferreira (Fiocruz -- Patrícia Machado Rodrigues e Silva)
2012 – Maíra Assunção Bicca (UFSC – Orientador: João Batista Calixto)
2013 – Jaqueline Raymondi Silva (FMRP-USP – Orientador: Fernando de Q. Cunha)
2014 -- Jhimmy Talbot (FMRP-USP – Orientador: Fernando de Q. Cunha)
A SBFTE, por meio deste prêmio, prima pelo reconhecimento do trabalho cientifico realizado por jovens
pesquisadores e incentivo à ciência brasileira.
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
17
Finalistas Prêmio José Ribeiro do Valle – 2015
Andrea Rodrigues Vasconcelos
Graduação:
Bacharelado e Licenciatura em Ciências Biológicas – USP (2008)
Pós-Graduação:
Mestrado em Ciências (Farmacologia) – USP (2011)
Doutorado (em andamento) em Ciências (Farmacologia) – USP.
Experiência:
Área de Farmacologia e Biologia Molecular, com ênfase em
Sinalização associada ao Envelhecimento, Neuroproteção,
Neuroinflamação e aos Processos Neurodegenerativos.
Orientador:
Cristoforo Scavone.
Coorientador:
Elisa Mitiko Kawamoto.
Daniele Maria Ferreira
Graduação:
Biomédica – Bacharel em Análises Clínicas – Unipar (2010)
Pós-Graduação:
Mestrado em Farmacologia – UFPR (2013)
Doutorado (em andamento) em Farmacologia – UFPR
Doutorado sanduíche no Tytgat Institute for Liver and Intestinal
Research (Orientador: R.M.J. van den Wijngaard) -- Amsterdam
Experiência:
Farmacologia de Produtos Naturais com ação sobre o trato
gastrointestinal, estudando principalmente modelos de úlcera
gástrica e doenças inflamatórias intestinais
Orientador:
Cristiane Hatsuko Baggio
João Francisco Cordeiro Pedrazzi
Graduação:
Bacharel em Ciências Biológicas – Unifal (2009)
Pós-Graduação:
Mestrado em Medicina (Neurologia) – USP (2014)
Doutorado (em andamento) em Neurologia – USP
Experiência:
Investiga o potencial antipsicótico do canabidiol (CBD) e seus
mecanismos de ação em modelos preditivos para ação de
antipsicóticos
Orientador:
Elaine Aparecida Del Bel Belluz Guimarães
Raquel Dal Sasso
Graduação:
Especialização
Pós-Graduação:
Experiência:
Orientador:
Freitas
Graduação em Nutrição – PUCRS (2011)
Prática em Terapia Intensiva – PUCRS (2013)
Mestrado em Medicina e Ciências da Saúde, na área de
concentração da Farmacologia Bioquímica e Molecular – PUCRS
(2015)
Doutorado (em andamento) – PUCRS
Atua no Laboratório de Farmacologia Aplicada e no Instituto de
Toxicologia e Farmacologia, nas áreas de farmacologia,
inflamação e nutrição
Maria Martha Campos
Juliana Florenzano Martorelli
Graduação:
Farmácia Bioquímica e Industrial -- USTJ (2006)
Pós-Graduação:
Mestrado em Farmacologia – USP (2011).
Doutorado (em andamento) em Ciências Biológicas (Farmacologia)
– USP
Experiência:
Experiência na área de Farmácia, com ênfase em Farmacologia,
atuando principalmente nos seguintes temas: Inflamação alérgica
pulmonar, efeitos da exposição inalatória à partículas liberadas da
exaustão do diesel (1,2-naftoquinona), defesas antioxidantes e
dimorfismo sexual
Orientador:
Soraia Kátia Pereira Costa
Coorientador:
Lucia Rossetti Lopes
18
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Program at a Glance
Sunday (27/09/2015)
Room 7
16h00-19h30
SBFTE Business Meeting
(only for SBFTE Board of Directors and Council Members)
Monday (28/09/2015)
Room 7
08h30‐09h45
10h00-13h00
10h00
13h00-14h30
Meeting of SBFTE Organizing Committee
(only for SBFTE Board of Directors and Council Members)
SBFTE Permanent Forum of the Graduate Programs in Pharmacology
(only for Heads of Pharmacology Graduate Programs, Council and Society Board)
Venue Secretariat Opening
Lunch
14h45-15h30
Room Topazio
Welcome session to all students, young investigators and faculty attendees from the SBFTE Board of
Directors and SBFTE Jovem
15h30-17h30
Symposia
Room Rubi
Targeting ECM-Remodeling and Matrix
Metalloproteinases as Potential
Therapeutic Mechanisms in
Cardiovascular Diseases and Cancer
Room Safira
Room Topazio
Novel Mechanisms and
Targets in Chronic Pain States
Behavioral Pharmacology
Room Real
18h15
18h30-19h15
19h15-20h15
20h15
Opening Ceremony
Honorary Session to Jorge A. Guimarães
Opening Lecture
Welcome Reception
Tuesday (29/09/2015)
08h00-08h50
Courses
(Class 1)
Room Rubi
Room Safira
Room Topazio
Ética em Experimentação Animal
Bioestatística aplicada
Fisiologia e Biofísica
do íon Ca2+
09h00-11h00
Symposia
Toxicological and Pharmacological
approach to the Development of
New Diuretic Drugs from Natural
Products
Pharmacology of
Intracellular Peptides
Nanomedicine and Novel
Perspectives in Drug Therapy
11h00-11h30
11h30-12h20
Conferences
12h20-13h30
13h30-15h30
Symposia
15h30-16h00
16h00-16h50
Conferences
17h00-18h00
18h10-19h10
19h15-20h15
Coffee break and Poster View
Visualization of GPCR
Complexes by Single-Particle
Electron Microscopy
Drug Discovery Strategies that
Lead to Success
Lunch
Nitrite and Nitrate in
Challenging Central Nervous
Cardiovascular Pharmacology
System to Induce
and Therapeutics
Neuroprotection
Coffee break and Poster View
In vitro and in vivo
Pharmacological
Influence of TRPA1 and other
Investigating Cell Surface Receptor
Characterization of
TRP Channels as
Dimerization and Complex
Cebranopadol a Novel Mixed
Thermosensitive Vascular
Formation with Fluorescent Ligands
Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ and
Sensors.
Opioid Receptor Agonist
Room Real
Como o Atual Cenário Político/Econômico impactará sobre os Programas da Capes e a Pós-graduação
neste mandato
Poster Session 1 (Odd numbers)
Room Rubi
Meet the Pharmacologist: Ethics in
Pharmacological Research
Room Safira
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Room Topazio
19
Wednesday (30/09/2015)
08h00-08h50
Courses
(Class 2)
09h00-11h00
Symposia
Room Rubi
Room Safira
Room Topazio
Ética em
Experimentação Animal
Bioestatística Aplicada
Fisiologia e Biofísica
do Íon Ca2+
Chronic Stress and
Neuroinflammation
11h00-11h30
11h30-12h20
Conferences
Drug/disease modeling
– integrating exposurebiomarker-clinical
outcome
12h20-13h30
12h30-13h30
Room Onix
Transient Receptor
Potential (TRP) Ion
Channels: A Clinical
Perspective for Pain,
Inflammation and
Vascular Disease
Coffee break and Poster View
Neuropharmacology of
Neurosteroid
Chemokine and
Biosynthesis in the
Inflammation
Treatment of PTSD
Lunch
Tecnologia de MicroFluídica de Perfusão
para Ensaios de
Atividade Biológica In
vivo like – Uma Nova
Fronteira para Ensaios
From Preclinical Studies
to Drug Licensing and
Development by Private
Partners
In vitro
13h30-15h30
Jose Ribeiro do Valle
Award
15h30-16h00
16h00-17h00
Oral
Communications
17h00-18h30
18h40-20h00
Oral Communication 1
Neuropharmacology
Coffee break and Poster View
Oral Communication 2
Inflammation, Pain And
Oral Communication 3
Nociception
Natural Products
Pharmacology
Seeking a Research
Career in the Brazilian
Pharmaceutical
Industry: Novel
Opportunities for
Young Investigators
SBFTE General
Assembly
Oral Communication 4
Cardiovascular, Renal
and Respiratory
Pharmacology
Round table:
Pharmacology in
Latin America
21h30-23h30
Meeting Party – Hotel Monte Real
Thursday (01/10/2015)
Room Rubi
08h00-08h50
Courses
(Class 3)
09h00-09h50
Conferences
10h00-11h00
11h15-12h15
12h15-13h00
13h00-14h00
20
Ética em Experimentação Animal
Beta-Blockers – Exploring New Drug
Discovery Horizons in Academia
Room Safira
Room Topazio
Bioestatística aplicada
Fisiologia e Biofísica
2+
do íon Ca
New Neuroactive Molecules
against Cerebral Ischemia and
Cerebrovascular Diseases in
Cuba: For the Ways of Effective
Neuroprotection
Poster Session 2 (Even numbers)
Room Real
Closing Conference
Awards, Honorary Session and Closing Ceremony
Farewell Lunch Party - To All Attendees before going home
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Scientific Program
Sunday 27/09/2015
16h00‐19h30
Room 7
Meeting of SBFTE Board of Directors and Deliberative Council
(only for Council and Society’s Board Members)
Monday 28/09/2015
08h30-09h45
Room 7
Meeting of SBFTE Organizing Committees
(only for SBFTE Board of Directors and Council Members)
10h00
Venue Secretariat Opening
10h00-13h00
Room 7
SBFTE Permanent Forum of the Graduate Programs in Pharmacology
(only for Heads of Pharmacology Graduate Programs, SBFTE Board of Directors and
Council Members)
13h00-14h30
Lunch
14h45-15h30
Room Topazio
Welcome session to all students, young investigators and faculty attendees from
the SBFTE Board of Directors and SBFTE Jovem)
15h30-17h30
Symposia
Room Rubi
Targeting ECM-remodeling and matrix metalloproteinases as potential therapeutic
mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases and cancer
Chairperson Michele Mazzaron de Castro (USP)
 Pharmacological targeting of intracellular proteases for diseases of oxidative stress
Richard Schulz (University of Alberta Canada)
 Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases as potential alternative to control maladaptive
vascular remodeling in hypertension
Michele Mazzaron de Castro (USP)

Increased circulating levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 impair cardiac function
Raquel Fernanda Gerlach (USP)

Room Safira
From the tissue microenvironment to the cell nucleus: ECM-signaling regulation of
mammary gland morphogenesis and cancer
Alexandre Bruni Cardoso (USP)
Novel mechanisms and targets in chronic pain states
Chairperson: Thiago M. Cunha (USP)
 Gasotransmitters and nociceptive response in the inflamed temporomandibular joint
Marcelo N. Muscará (USP)
 Novel experimental evidence on the mechanisms underlying chronic tooth pulp pain
Maria Martha Campos (PUC-RS)
 Inverse agonist of type-1 cannabinoid receptors as tools for the treatment for chronic
pain
Camila S. Dale (USP)

Room Topazio
Novel targets for neuropathic pain control
Thiago M. Cunha (USP)
Behavioral Pharmacology
(Tribute to Roberto Frussa Filho)
Chairperson: Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM)
 Tardive dyskinesia: The contribution of Professor Roberto Frussa Filho to the
comprehension of the disease
Maria Aparecida Barbato Frazão Vital (UFPR)

On memory and reminiscence of Roberto Frussa Filho
Jorge Alberto Quillfeldt (UFRGS)

Sleep privation and our current society
Monica Levy Andersen (Unifesp-EPM)

Intervention points on drug abuse treatment
Eduardo A. V. Marinho (UESC)
20h15
Welcome Reception
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
21
Room Real
18h15
Opening ceremony
18h30-19h15
Honorary Session to Jorge A. Guimarães
Research and Post-Graduation in Brazil: Past, Present and Future. Some Reflections about
the Development of Pharmacology in Brazil
Jorge A. Guimarães (UFRGS)
Introduced by Jamil Assreuy (UFSC)
19h15-20h15
Opening Lecture
Alternative Approach to Lead Generation
Sam Enna (University of Kansas, President of IUPHAR, USA)
Introduced by Maria Christina W. de Avellar (Unifesp-EPM)
Tuesday 29/09/2015
08h00-08h50
Room Rubi
Room Safira
Room Topazio
Courses
Ética em Experimentação Animal
Chairperson: Stela Maris Kuze Rates (UFRGS)
 1a aula: Diretrizes e princípios éticos
Stela Maris Kuze Rates (UFRGS)
Bioestatística aplicada
Chairpersons: Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM) / François G. Noël (UFRJ)
 1a aula: Regressão não linear e analise de curva dose-efeito
François G. Noël (UFRJ)
Fisiologia e Biofísica do íon Ca2+
Chairpersons: Alexandre Pinto Corrado (USP) / Rosely Oliveira Godinho (Unifesp-EPM)
 1a aula: Biofísica das correntes de cálcio
Viviane Louise Andree Nouailhetas (Unifesp-EPM)
09h00-11h00
Symposia
Room Rubi
Toxicological and pharmacological approach to the development of new diuretic drugs from
natural products
Chairperson: Arquimedes Gasparotto Jr (UFGD)
 Ethnopharmacological survey of new diuretic drugs derived from Brazilian biodiversity
Arquimedes Gasparotto Jr (UFGD)
 Latin America network for search of new diuretic drugs from plants used in traditional
medicine
Dora María Benjumea Gutiérrez (University of Antioquia, Colombia)

Regulatory information for the nonclinical toxicology studies and safety evaluation in the
development of new diuretic drugs from natural products
Paulo Roberto Dalsenter (UFPR)
Pharmacology of Intracellular Peptides
Chairperson: Emer S. Ferro (USP)
 Hemopressin and its therapeutic applications for treating neurodegenerative diseases
Ricardo Augusto de Melo Reis (UFRJ)
 A novel therapeutic strategy to metabolic disorders: white to brown adipose tissue
differentiation using Pep19
Room Safira
Andrea Sterman Heimann (Proteimax Consultoria)

Molecular and behavior characterization of oligopeptidase knockout animals
Jair Ribeiro Chagas (Unifesp)

Mapping protein interactions between AGH peptide and 14.3.3 epsilon by cross-linking/MS
and molecular modeling
Fábio C. Gozzo (Unicamp)
22
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Room Topazio
Nanomedicine and novel perspectives in drug therapy
Chairperson: Marco Aurélio Martins (Fiocruz)
 One pot synthesis of surface-functionalized lipid-core nanocapsules
Adriana Raffin Pohlmann (UFRGS)
 Nanotechnology as an established tool in drug research and cosmetics
Silvia Guterres (UFRGS)
 Nanodrugs for topical and oral treatment of leishmaniasis
Bartira Bergmann (UFRJ)
 Nanotechnology for drug delivery as a promising alternative to pulmonary diseases
Andressa Bernardi (Fiocruz)
11h00-11h30
Coffee break and Poster View
11h30-12h20
Conferences
Room Rubi
Room Topazio
Drug discovery strategies that lead to success
David C Swinney (IRND, USA)
Introduced by François G. Noël (UFRJ)
Visualization of GPCR complexes by single-particle electron microscopy
Georgios Skiniotis (University of Michigan, USA)
Introduced by Claudio M. Costa-Neto (USP)
12h20-13h30
Lunch
13h30-15h30
Symposia
Room Safira
Nitrite and nitrate in cardiovascular pharmacology and therapeutics
Chairperson: Jose Eduardo Tanus dos Santos (USP)
 An overview of the biological chemistry of nitrite and nitrate ions.
José Carlos Toledo Junior (USP)
 Mechanisms of antihypertensive effects of sodium nitrite and nitrate
Jose Eduardo Tanus dos Santos (USP)
 Nitrite modulates mitochondrial function in rat heart and cardiomyocytes in non-hypoxic
conditions
Room Topazio
Rafael de Lima Portella (USP)
Challenging central nervous system to induce neuroprotection
Chairperson: Elisa Mitiko Kawamoto (USP)
 Toll-like Receptor 4 is Involved in Spontaneous Fat and Sugar Preference
Simonetta Camandola (NIH, USA)
 Microdose lithium treatment in prevention of Alzheimer’s disease
Hudson Sousa Buck (Santa Casa-SP)
 Brain plasticity induced by cardiosteroids
Cristoforo Scavone (USP)
15h30-16h00
Coffee break and Poster View
16h00-16h50
Conferences
Room Rubi
Room Safira
Room Topazio
Investigating cell surface receptor dimerization and complex formation with fluorescent
ligands
Stephen Hill (University of Nottingham, UK)
Introduced by Thereza Christina B. Fidalgo (UERJ)
In vitro and in vivo pharmacological characterization of cebranopadol a novel mixed
nociceptin/orphanin FQ and opioid receptor agonist
Girolamo Calo (University of Ferrara, Italy)
Introduced by Elaine C. Gavioli (UFRN)
Influence of TRPA1 and other TRP channels as thermosensitive vascular sensors.
Suzan D. Brain (King´s College, UK)
Introduced by Marcelo Muscará (USP)
17h00-18h00
SBFTE Permanent Forum of Graduate Programs in Pharmacology
Room Real
Como o atual cenário político/econômico impactará sobre os Programas da Capes e a
Pós-graduação neste mandato
Marcio de Castro Silva Filho (USP)
Introduced by Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM)
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
23
18h10-19h10
Poster Session 1 (Odd numbers)
01.
02.
03.
04.
05.
06.
07.
08.
09.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
19h15-20h15
Room Rubi
Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology (01.001-01.017)
Neuropharmacology (02.001-02.021)
Psychopharmacology (03.001-03-011)
Inflammation and Immunopharmacology (04.001-04.061)
Pain and Nociception Pharmacology (05.001-05.035)
Cardiovascular and Renal Pharmacology (06.001-06.037) and 06.036
Endocrine, Reproductive and Urogenital Pharmacology (07.001-07.007)
Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Pharmacology (08.001-08.019)
Natural Products and Toxinology (09.001-09.063 and 09.022)
Cancer Pharmacology (10.001-10.007)
Pharmacokinetics and Toxicology (11.001-11.015)
Pharmacogenomics, Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Pharmacology (12.001-12.003)
Drug Discovery and Development (13.001-13.013)
Pharmacology Education and Technology (14.001)
Pharmacology: Others (15.001-15.005)
SBFTE Jovem
Meet the Pharmacologist: Ethics in Pharmacological Research
Coordinator: Erick J R Silva (Unesp-Botucatu)
 Cristoforo Scavone (USP)
 David C Swinney (IRND, USA)
 Graziano Pinna (University of Illinois, USA)
 Jamil Assreuy (UFSC)
 Letícia V. Costa Lotufo (USP)
 Marco Aurélio Martins (Fiocruz)
 Regina P. Markus (USP)
 Sam Enna (University of Kansas President IUPHAR, USA)
 Simonetta Camandola (NIA, NIH)
 Stela Maris Kuze Rates (UFRGS)
24
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Wednesday 30/09/15
08h00-08h50
Room Rubi
Room Safira
Room Topazio
Courses
Ética em Experimentação Animal
Chairperson: Stela Maris Kuze Rates (UFRGS)
 2a aula: Biotérios e manejo de animais
Luisa Maria Gomes de Macedo Braga (PUC-RS)
Bioestatística Aplicada
Chairpersons: Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM) / François G. Noël (UFRJ)
 2a aula: Introdução à Análise de variância e ANOVA de uma via
Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM)
Fisiologia e Biofísica do Íon Ca2+
Chairpersons: Alexandre Pinto Corrado (USP) / Rosely Oliveira Godinho (Unifesp-EPM)
 2a aula: Técnicas óticas e não óticas para medição da concentração intracelular de
cálcio
Edgar Paredes Gamero (Unifesp-EPM)
09h00-11h00
Room Rubi
Room Safira
Symposia
Chronic Stress and Neuroinflammation
Chairperson: Vinicius de Frias Carvalho (Fiocruz)
 Role of PPAR-gamma on the hyperactivity of HPA axis observed in diabetic rats
Vinicius de Frias Carvalho (Fiocruz)
 Chronic Stress and Pain
Iraci L. da Silva Torres (UFRGS)
 Stress, HPA axis and Depression
Mario Francisco Juruena (USP)
From Preclinical Studies to Drug Licensing and Development by Private Partners
Chairperson: François G. Noël (UFRJ)
 Discovery and development of kinase inhibitors for trypanosome diseases
David C Swinney (IRND, USA)
 Novel local anesthetic analogues as candidates for asthma therapy
Marco Aurelio Martins (Fiocruz)
 Multitarget antagonists of 1A-, 1D-adrenoceptors and 5-HT1A receptors: Potential new
strategy for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia
Claudia Lucia Martins Silva (UFRJ)

Room Topazio
Preclinical studies of ACH09, an extract obtained from vinifera grape skin
Ângela de Castro Resende (UERJ)
Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Ion Channels: A Clinical Perspective for Pain, Inflammation
and Vascular Disease
Chairperson: Marcelo N. Muscará (USP)
 TRP channels and potential for treatment in vascular and inflammatory disease
Suzan D. Brain (King´s College, UK)
 Neonatal ambient pollutant exposure enhances vulnerability to asthma and impairs
vascular reactivity in adolescence: Is there a role for TRP channels?
Antonio Soares Jr (USP)

Elucidating the role of TRP channels in skin inflammation
Xenia Kodji (King´s College)

TRPA1 role in joint disease: From basic to translational research
Elizabeth Soares Fernandes (UniCEUMA)
11h00-11h30
Coffee break and Poster View
11h30-12h20
Conferences
Room Rubi
Room Safira
Drug/disease modeling – integrating exposure-biomarker-clinical outcome
Mats Karlsson (University of Uppsala, Sweden)
Introduced by Teresa Dalla Costa (UFRGS)
Neuropharmacology of Neurosteroid Biosynthesis in the Treatment of PTSD
Graziano Pinna (University of Illinois, USA)
Introduced by Maria Christina W. de Avellar (Unifesp-EPM)
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
25
Room Topazio
Chemokine and Inflammation
Gerard Graham (University of Glasgow, Scotland)
Introduced by: Patrícia M. Rodrigues e Silva Martins (Fiocruz)
12h20-13h30
Lunch
12h30-13h30
Room Safira
Simpósio Merck SA
Tecnologia de Micro Fluídica de Perfusão para Ensaios de Atividade Biológica In vivo like –
Uma Nova Fronteira Para Ensaios In vitro
Palestrante: Misael Silva (Merck SA)
13h30-15h30
Room Rubi
Jose Ribeiro do Valle Award
Chairperson: Maria Christina W. de Avellar (Unifesp-EPM)
Andrea Rodrigues Vasconcelos

01.002 Age-related adaptive effects of intermittent fasting during neuroinflammation.
Vasconcelos AR1, Yshii LM1, Kinoshita PF1, Böhmer AE1, Orellana AMM1, de Sá Lima L1,
Alves R1, Andreotti DZ1, Marcourakis T1, Viel TA1, Buck HS2, Mattson MP3, Scavone C1,
Kawamoto EM1 1USP, 2Santa Casa de São Paulo, 3NIH
Daniele Maria Ferreira

09.001 Rhamnogalacturonan as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of
ulcerative colitis. Maria-Ferreira D1, Borato DG1, da Silva LM, Corso CR1, Nascimento AM2,
Cipriani TR2, Watanabe PS3, Santana DMG3, van den Wijngaard RM, Werner MFP1, Baggio
CH1 1UFPR – Farmacologia, 2UFPR – Bioquímica, 3UEM
João Francisco Cordeiro Pedrazzi

03.001 Cannabinoids compounds attenuate sensorimotor gating disruption induced by
amphetamine in mice. Pedrazzi JFC1, Issy AC2, Gomes FV3, Guimarães FS3, Del Bel EA2
1
FMRP-USP – Neurociências e Ciências do Comportamento, 2FORP-USP – Fisiologia,
Morfologia e Patologia Básica, 3FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
Raquel Dal Sasso Freitas

05.002 Pre-clinical evidence on the benefits of docosahexanoic acid on adverse and
anti-tumoral effects of cyclophosphamide. Freitas RDS1,2, Costa KM2,1, Nicoletti NF2,1,
Campos MM3,2,1 1PUCRS – Toxicologia e Farmacologia, 2PUCRS – Medicina e Ciências da
Saúde, 3PUCRS – Odontologia
Juliana Florenzano

04.003 Increased TRPA1 mRNA expression and antioxidant enzymes activity may
contribute to sex differences in pulmonary allergic inflammation in young mice prior
exposed to ambient pollutant 1,2-naphthoquinone. Florenzano J, Santos KT, Feitosa KB,
Soares AG, Rodrigues L, Teixeira SA, Muscará MN, Costa SKP ICB-USP – Farmacologia
15h30-16h00
Coffee break and Poster View
16h00-17h00
Oral Communications
Room Rubi
Room Safira
26
Oral Communication 1
Neuropharmacology
Chairperson: André S. Pupo (Unesp-Botucatu)
 03.002 Paroxetine potentiates antinociceptive process induced by chemical stimulation of
ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter. Biagioni AF, Santos GHR, Coimbra NC FMRP-USP
– Farmacologia
 02.005 Pharmacological evaluation of new aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Inhibitors as
candidates for the treatment of cocaine addiction. Silva RR1, de Oliveira CR1, Costa PRR2,
Cunha TTS3, Fraga CAM3, Noël F1 1ICB-UFRJ, 2IPPN-UFRJ, 3UFRJ – Farmacologia e
Química Medicinal
 02.009 Proteinase Activated receptor-4 agonist elicits TRP-mediated in vitro and in vivo
responses. Patricio ES1, Costa R1,2, Figueiredo CP1,2, Gers-Barlag K3, Bicca MA1, Manjavachi
MN1, Segat GC1, Gentry C3, Luiz AP1, Fernandes ES4, Cunha TM5, Bevan S3, Calixto JB1
1
UFSC – Farmacologia, 2UFRJ – Farmácia, 3King's College – Wolfson Centre for Age
Related Diseases, 4Ceuma – Biologia Parasitária, 5FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
 02.004 Selective blockade of EP1 and EP3 receptors attenuate pentylenetetrazole-induced
seizures in mice. Marafiga JR1, Reschke CR1, Jesse AC1, Masson CJ1, Lenz QF1, Mello CF1
1
UFSM – Farmacologia e Fisiologia
Oral Communication 2
Inflammation, Pain and Nociception Pharmacology
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Room Topazio
Room Onix
Chairperson: Thiago Mattar Cunha (USP)
 04.005 The mechanisms of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome inhibition by flavonoids.
Domiciano TP1, Verri Jr WA2, Jones HD3, Chen S4, Crother TC4, Shimada K4, Arditi M4
1
UEL – Ciências da Saúde, 2UEL – Patologia, 3Cedars Sinai Medical Center – Pulmonary
and Critical Care Medicine, 4Cedars Sinai Medical Center – Pediatric, Infectious diseases
and Immunology
 04.010 Annexin A1 (ANXA-1)-mimetic peptide controls the inflammatory and fibrotic
effects induced by house dust mite (HDM) in mice. Ferreira TPT1, Souza ET1, Trentin PG1,
Silva TV1, Castro GC1, Arantes ACS1, Flower R2, Perretti M2, Martins MA1, Silva PMR1
1
Fiocruz, 2WHRI – Biochemical Pharmacology
 04.011 SN-38, the active metabolite of the anticancer agent irinotecan, is an antagonist
of the toll-like receptor 4. Wong DVT2,1, González RH2, Wanderley CWS2, Borges VF3, Leite
CAVG2, Batista GLP2, Ribeiro-Filho HV2, Lima JB3, Bem AXC2, Silva KO1,2, Brito GAC4, Cunha
TM3, Lima-Júnior RCP2, Cunha FQ3, Ribeiro RA2,1 1ICC, 2UFC – Fisiologia e Farmacologia,
3
FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 4UFC – Morfologia
 05.003 The role of pattern recognition receptors like toll-like receptors 4 in herpetic and
post-herpetic neuralgia. Silva CR1, Berlink J1, Raymondi J1, Cunha FQ1, Cunha TM1 1FMRPUSP – Farmacologia.
Oral Communication 3
Natural Products
Chairperson: Jamil Assreuy (UFSC)
 09.002 The role of oxidative stress in indigo alkaloid protection against TNBS-induced
colitis in rats. de Almeida ACA1, de Faria FM1, Manzo LPB1, Dunder RJ1, Socca EAR1, LuizFerreira A2, Souza Brito ARM1 1IB-Unicamp, 2UFG – Ciências Biológicas
 09.004 Effect of 2-Phenylquinoline in experimentally induced gastric ulcers: Pathways of
gastroprotection. Breviglieri E1, da Silva LM1, Boeing T1, Somensi LB1, Gimenez A2,
Cechinel-Filho V1, Andrade SF1 – 1Univali – Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Universidad Mayor
de San Andrés
 08.002 Quercetin targets senescent lung fibroblasts from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
patients. Hohmann MS1, Habiel DM2, Coelho AL2, Verri Jr WA1, Hogaboam CM2 1UEL –
Ciências Patólogicas, 2Cedars Sinai Medical Center – Pulmonary Medicine
 09.006 Evidences about gastric healing activity of Maytenus robusta Reissek: in vitro and
in vivo studies. Costa P, da Silva LM, Boeing T, Somensi LB, Cury BJ, Steimbach VMB,
Santin JR, Cechinel-Filho V, Andrade SF Univali – Pharmaceutical Sciences
Oral Communication 4
Cardiovascular, Renal and Respiratory Pharmacology
Chairperson: Marcelo Muscará (USP)
 06.004 Activation of a novel estrogen receptor by the agonist G1 ameliorates
monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in male rats. Alencar AKN1, Montes GC1,
Martinez ST2, Pinto AC2, Groban L3, Sudo RT1, Zapata-Sudo G1 – 1ICB-UFRJ –
Desenvolvimento de Fármacos, 2UFRJ – Química, 3Wake Forest University – Anesthesiology
 06.005 Mechanisms underlying diuretic effect of Gomphrena celosioides Mart.
(Amaranthaceae). Vasconcelos PCP1, Spessoto D1, Gasparotto Junior A1, Kassuya CAL1
1
UFGD – Ciências da Saúde
 06.009 Redox-sensitive phosphorylation of AKT and ENOS and nitric oxide pathways are
involved in the cardiovascular effects induced by northeastern Brazilian red wine from
São Francisco river valley. Ribeiro TP1,2, Oliveira AC1, Mendes-Junior LG1, Vasconcelos
WP1, França KC3, Nakao LS3, Schini-Kerth V2, Medeiros IA1 1UFPB – Ciências
Farmacêuticas, 2Université de Strasbourg, 3UFPR – Patologia
 08.006 Extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway and carbachol synergistically increase
airway smooth muscle contraction. Pacini ESA, Godinho RO Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
27
17h00-18h30
SBFTE Jovem – Mesa Redonda
Room Rubi
Seeking a Research Career in the Brazilian Pharmaceutical Industry: Novel Opportunities for
Young Investigators
Coordinator: Erick J R Silva (Unesp-Botucatu)
Representantes da Indústria
 Carlos Eduardo Vitor (Aché Laboratórios Farmacêuticos SA)
 Julio Alejandro Rojas Moscoso (Biolab)
Representantes da Academia
 Gilberto de Nucci (Unicamp)
 João Batista Calixto (UFSC)
Round Table
Room Topazio
Pharmacology in Latin America
Coordinator: Leticia V. Costa Lotufo (USP)
 Maria Christina W. de Avellar (SBFTE President, Brasil)
 Sam Enna (IUPHAR President, USA)
 René Delgado-Hernandez (SCF President, Cuba)
18h40-20h00
Room Rubi
SBFTE General Assembly
21h30-23h00
Meeting Party – Hotel Monte Real
28
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Thursday 01/10/15
08h00-08h50
Room Rubi
Room Safira
Room
Topazio
09h00-09h50
Room Rubi
Room Safira
10h00-11h00
Courses
Ética em Experimentação Animal
Chairperson: Stela Maris Kuze Rates (UFRGS)
 3a aula: Regulamentação e Diretrizes para experimentação animal no Brasil
Marco Antonio Stephano (Concea/USP)
Bioestatística aplicada
Chairpersons: Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM) / François G. Noël (UFRJ)
 3a aula: ANOVA de duas vias
Carlos Fernando de Mello (UFSM)
Fisiologia e Biofísica do Íon Ca2+
Chairpersons: Alexandre Pinto Corrado (USP) / Rosely Oliveira Godinho (Unifesp-EPM)
 3a aula:
 Efeitos fisiológicos relevantes mediados pelo íon Ca2+
Alexandre Pinto Corrado (USP)
Conferences
Beta-Blockers – Exploring New Drug Discovery Horizons in Academia
Jillian Baker (University of Nottingham, UK)
Introduced by Fernando de Q. Cunha (USP)
New Neuroactive Molecules against Cerebral Ischemia and Cerebrovascular Diseases in Cuba:
For the Ways of Effective Neuroprotection
René Delgado-Hernandez (Medical University of Havana, Cuba; SCF President, Cuba)
Introduced by Maria Christina W. de Avellar (Unifesp-EPM)
Poster Session 2 (Even numbers) with Coffee-Break
01.
02.
03.
04.
05.
06.
07.
08.
09.
10.
11.
12.
Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology (01.002-01.018)
Neuropharmacology (02.002-02.022)
Psychopharmacology (03.002-03.010)
Inflammation and Immunopharmacology (04.002-04.062)
Pain and Nociception Pharmacology (05.002-05.036)
Cardiovascular and Renal Pharmacology (06.002-06.034)
Endocrine, Reproductive and Urogenital Pharmacology (07.002-07.006)
Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Pharmacology (08.002-08.018)
Natural Products and Toxinology (09.002-09.062 and 09.031)
Cancer Pharmacology (10.002-10.006)
Pharmacokinetics and Toxicology (11.002-11.014)
Pharmacogenomics, Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Pharmacology (12.002)
13. Drug Discovery and Development (13.002-13.014)
15. Pharmacology: Others (15.002-15.004)
Room Real
11h15-12h15
Closing Conference
Sergio Ferreira Lecture
Serotonin in Panic and Anxiety
Frederico G. Graeff (USP)
Introduced by Fernando de Q. Cunha (USP)
12h15-13h00
Awards Announcements
Honorary Session
Launching 50th Anniversary Celebration – SBFTE
Closing Ceremony
13h00-14h00
Farewell Lunch Party - To All Attendees before going home
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
29
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
30
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Poster Session 1 – 29/09/2015 (Odd Numbers)
01. Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology
01.001 Mechanism of action of LASSBio-579, an N-Phenylpiperazine Compound Elected as an atypical
antipsychotic drug candidate. Pompeu TET1, do Monte FM1, Hermans E2, Menegatti R3, Fraga CAM4, Barreiro
EJ5, Noël F1 1UFRJ – Farmacologia Bioquímica e Molecular, 2Université Catholique de Louvain – Neurociências,
3
UFG – Farmácia, 4UFRJ – Farmacologia e Química Medicinal, 5UFRJ – Ciências Biomédicas
01.003 Lipid rafts disruption and effects on the migration of tumour cells line MDA-MB 231. Guerra FS1, Costa
ML2, Fernandes PD1, Mermelstein C2 1UFRJ – Farmacologia e Química Medicinal, 2UFRJ – Biologia Celular e
Molecular
01.005 LDT5 Prevents the increase of rat intra-urethral pressure without causing a hypotensive effect.
Nascimento-Viana JB1, Romeiro LAS2, Noël F1, Silva CLM1 1UFRJ – Farmacologia Bioquímica e Molecular, 2UnB
– Lab. Desenvolvimento de Estratégias Terapêuticas
01.007 Changes of heart, kidney and brain Na/K-ATPase in rats with ouabain-induced hypertension. Feijó
PRO1, Neto A2, Rossoni LV2, Noël F1, Quintas LEM1 1UFRJ – Farmacologia Bioquímica e Molecular, 2ICB-USP –
Farmacologia
01.009 Evaluation of the bone morphogenetic protein 9 role in neonatal rat islets maturation. Silva PMR1,
Leite AR2, Santos GJ3, Lellis-Santos C4, Boschero AC3, Caperuto LC4, Gomes PR1, Anhê GF1, Bordin S2 1FCMUnicamp, 2ICB-USP, 3IB-UNICAMP, 4Unifesp
01.011 Cytotoxicity and chemotactic activity of L-Amino Acid Oxidase from Bothrops jararaca snake venom in
rat lung macrophages. Fonseca FV1, Panunto PC1, Pereira BB1, Marcelino EP1, Torres-Huaco FD1, da Silva IRF1,
Hyslop S1 – 1FCM-Unicamp – Bioquímica e Farmacologia
01.013 Which are the histamine receptors involved in the regulation atrial in Wistar-EPM1 rats? Nascimento
SR, Musial DC, Miranda-Ferreira R, de Souza BP, Jurkiewicz A, Jurkiewicz NH Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia
01.015 Glucocorticoid receptor expression during rat wolffian duct morphogenesis. Thimoteo DS1, Ribeiro CM1,
Silva EJR2, Hinton BT3, Avellar MCW1 1Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia, 2Unesp – Farmacologia, 3University of
Virginia School of Medicine – Cell Biology
01.017 Cyclic AMP released from skeletal muscle fiber modulates muscle contraction through the activation of
presynaptic adenosine receptors. Duarte T, Pacini ESA, Godinho RO Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia
01.019 P2Y1 Receptor Activation Upregulates the Endothelial Cell ICAM-1 Membrane Expression and Leukocyte
Adhesion. Cardoso TC1, Pompeu TET1, Silva CLM1 UFRJ – Farmacologia Bioquímica e Molecular
02. Neuropharmacology
02.001 Altered [3H]-GABA release stimulated by Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor (nAChR) activation in
cerebellar synaptosomes of dystrophic (mdx) mice. Silva JDP1, Frangiotti MIB1, Nogueira FM1, Stilhano RS2,
Sinigaglia-Coimbra R3, Ko GM4, Han SW2, Souccar C1 1Unifesp-EPM – Pharmacology, 2Unifesp-EPM – Biophysics,
3
Unifesp-EPM – Centro de Microscopia Eletrônica, 4Unifesp-EPM – Laboratory of Animal Experimentation
02.003 Montelukast Enhances the anticonvulsant effect of phenobarbital on PTZ-induced seizure in mice: an
isobolographic analysis. Jesse AC, Fleck J, Marafiga JR, Temp FR, Mello CF UFSM – Fisiologia e Farmacologia
02.005 Pharmacological evaluation of new aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Inhibitors as candidates for the
treatment of cocaine addiction. Silva RR1, de Oliveira CR1, Costa PRR2, Cunha TTS3, Fraga CAM3, Noël F1 1ICBUFRJ, 2IPPN-UFRJ, 3UFRJ – Farmacologia e Química Medicinal
02.007 The role of dorsal medial prefrontal cortex in context-induced alcohol-seeking in rats. Palombo P1,
Bianchi PC1, Leão RM1, Oliveira PEC1, Planeta CS1, Cruz FC2 1Unesp-Araraquara – Princípios Ativos Naturais e
Toxicologia, 2IFSC-USP
02.009 Proteinase Activated receptor-4 agonist elicits TRP-mediated in vitro and in vivo responses. Patricio
ES1, Costa R1,2, Figueiredo CP1,2, Gers-Barlag K3, Bicca MA1, Manjavachi MN1, Segat GC1, Gentry C3, Luiz AP1,
Fernandes ES4, Cunha TM5, Bevan S3, Calixto JB1 1UFSC – Farmacologia, 2UFRJ – Farmácia, 3King's College –
Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases, 4Ceuma – Biologia Parasitária, 5FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
02.011 Effects caused by the CB1 inverse agonist rimonabant in a pharmacologic animal model of
schizophrenia. Nazareth NJ, Marques AM, Neves GA ICB-UFRJ – Farmacologia Molecular
02.013 Characterization of a model of neuronal PTEN haploinsufficiency: Memory- and metabolism-associated
effects. Cabral-Costa JV1, Andreotti DZ1, Mattson MP2, Camandola S2, Scavone C1, Kawamoto EM1 1USP –
Farmacologia, 2NIA-NIH
02.015 Chronic ouabain counteracted the effects of chronic unpredictable stress in the HPA axis and CREB
signaling. Leite JA, Orellana AMM, Kinoshita PF, de Sá Lima L, Andreotti DZ, Kawamoto EM, Munhoz CD,
Scavone C ICB-USP – Farmacologia
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
31
02.017 Anxiogenic-like effect of a single subconvulsant dose of pilocarpine in Swiss mice depends on the
gender. Barbosa MN1, Silva NKGT1, Santos JA, Silva BL, Gavioli EC, Duarte FS, de Lima TCM, Duzzioni M UFAL
– Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde
02.019 AT1 receptors in the prelimbic cortex modulate cardiovascular responses to acute restraint stress in
rats. Brasil TFB, Fassini A, Corrêa FMA FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
02.021 Allopregnanolone effects on GABA A receptor subunits mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC)
of rats. Almeida FB1, Agnes G2, Nin MS3,1, Barros HMT1 1UFCSPA – Farmacociências, 2UFCSPA – Biologia
Molecular, 3Centro Universitário Metodista do IPA
03. Psychopharmacology
03.001 Cannabinoids compounds attenuate sensorimotor gating disruption induced by amphetamine in mice.
Pedrazzi JFC1, Issy AC2, Gomes FV3, Guimarães FS3, Del Bel EA2 1FMRP-USP – Neurociências e Ciências do
Comportamento, 2FORP-USP – Fisiologia, Morfologia e Patologia Básica, 3FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
03.003 Antidepressant-like effects of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ receptor antagonists in the learned helplessness
model in mice. Holanda VAD, Asth L, Medeiros IU, Guerrini R, Calo' G, Gavioli EC UFRN
03.005 Does Standard treatment for organophosphorus pesticides poisoning affects depressive like-behavior
induced by chlorpyrifos in rats? Siqueira AA1, Marques GLM1, Minassa VS2, Sampaio KN1, Beijamini V1,3 1UFES –
Ciências Farmacêuticas, 2UFES – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 3UFES – Bioquímica e Farmacologia
03.007 Thimet oligopeptidae (EP24.15) knockout mice show depressive behavior. Reckziegel P, Franco RD,
Ferro ES USP – Farmacologia
03.009 Initial phenotype characterization of thimet oligopeptidase (EP24.15) knockout mice. Franco RD1, Castro
LM2, Reckziegel P1, Camarini R1, Ferro ES1 1USP – Farmacologia, 2Unesp – Biologia
03.011 Exposure to running wheels prevents the development of conditioned place preference induced by
ethanol in mice: The role of transcriptional factor CREB in specific brain tissues. Contó MB1, D' Almeida V2,
Camarini R1 – 1ICB-USP – Departamento de Farmacologia, 2Unifesp – Psicobiologia
04. Inflammation and Immunopharmacology
04.001 Identification of novel sulfonamide and sulfonilhidrazone derivatives active to accelerate resolution of
silicosis in mice. Souza ET1, Nunes IKC2, Ferreira TPT1, Ciambarella BT1, Carvalho VF1, Azevedo RB1, Lima LM2,
Barreiro EJ2, Martin MA1, Silva PMR1 1IOC-Fiocruz, 2LASSBio-UFRJ – Avaliação e Síntese de Substâncias
Bioativas
04.003 Increased TRPA1 mRNA expression and antioxidant enzymes activity may contribute to sex differences
in pulmonary allergic inflammation in young mice prior exposed to ambient pollutant 1,2-naphthoquinone.
Florenzano J, Santos KT, Feitosa KB, Soares AG, Rodrigues L, Teixeira SA, Muscará MN, Costa SKP ICB-USP –
Farmacologia
04.005 The mechanisms of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome inhibition by flavonoids. Domiciano TP1, Verri Jr
WA2, Jones HD3, Chen S4, Crother TC4, Shimada K4, Arditi M4 – 1UEL – Ciências da Saúde, 2UEL – Patologia,
3
Cedars Sinai Medical Center – Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 4Cedars Sinai Medical Center –
Pediatric, Infectious diseases and Immunology
04.007 Hypercorticosterolemia observed in diabetic rats depends on TLR4 activation. Magalhães NS1, Torres
RC1, Prevatto JP1, Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque CF2, Martins MA1, Silva PMR1, Carvalho VF1 – 1Fiocruz –
Farmacologia e Inflamação, 2Fiocruz – Imunofarmacologia
04.009 JM25-1, a lidocaine analogue combining airway relaxant, anti-inflammatory and antieosinophilic
properties: implications for new asthma therapy. Cotias AC1, Serra MF1, Neves JS2, Couto GC1, Pão CRR1,
Olsen PC2, Anjos-Valotta EA1, Faria RX3, Costa JC3, Cordeiro RSB1, Carvalho KIM1, Silva PMR1, Martins MA1
1
Fiocruz – Fisiologia e Farmacodinâmica, 2UFRJ, 3Fiocruz
04.011 SN-38, the active metabolite of the anticancer agent irinotecan, is an antagonist of the toll-like
receptor 4. Wong DVT2,1, González RH2, Wanderley CWS2, Borges VF3, Leite CAVG2, Batista GLP2, Ribeiro-Filho
HV2, Lima JB3, Bem AXC2, Silva KO1,2, Brito GAC4, Cunha TM3, Lima-Júnior RCP2, Cunha FQ3, Ribeiro RA2,1 1ICC,
2
UFC – Fisiologia e Farmacologia, 3FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 4UFC – Morfologia
04.013 The absence of the atypical chemokine receptor D6 leads to high mortality during sepsis. Castanheira
FVS, Sonego F, Kanashiro A, Borges VF, Colon DF, Donate PB, Melo PH, Russo RC, Amaral FA, Teixeira MM,
Graham GJ, Locati M, Cunha TM, Alves-Filho JC, Cunha FQ USP – Farmacologia
04.015 Identifying macrophages autophagy phenotypes in diabetes. Sunahara KKS1, Nunes FPB2, Sannomya P3,
Martins JO2 1FMUSP – Fisiopatologia, 2FCF-USP – Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, 3FMUSP
04.017 Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of quercetin in a chronic model of titanium dioxide
(TIO2)-induced arthritis in mice. Borghi SM2,1, Mizokami SS1, Pinho-Ribeiro FA1, Casagrande R3, Verri Jr WA1
1
UEL – Ciências Patólogicas, 2UEL – Patologia, 3UEL – Ciências Farmacêuticas
32
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
04.019 Influence of leptin receptor expression in lipid mediators production, in primary culture of pulmonary
endothelial cells from intrauterine undernourished rats, stimulated by LPS. Azevedo GA1, Balbino AM1, Santos
LA1, Gil NL1, Silva MM1, Fernandes L1, Landgraf MA2,1, Landgraf RG1 1Unifesp-Diadema – Inflamação e
Farmacologia Vascular, 2USP – Farmacologia
04.021 TRPC5 regulates temperature and body weight in septic mice. Pereira DMS1, Mendes SJF1, Castro Jr
JAA1, Aubdool A2, Alawi K2, Takore P2, Grisotto MAG1, Brain S2, Fernandes ES3 – 1Universidade Ceuma –
Biologia Parasitária, 2King's College London – Vascular Biology and Inflammation, Cardiovascular Division,
3
Universidade Ceuma and King´s College London
04.023 Role of endothelin receptor antagonists in primary culture of lung endothelial cells activated by LPS.
Silva MM1, Balbino AM1, Gil NL1, Azevedo GA1, Fernandes L1, Landgraf MA2,1, Landgraf RG1 1Unifesp-Diadema –
Laboratório de Inflamação e Farmacologia Vascular, 2USP – Farmacologia
04.025 Tumoral necrosis factor-alpha inhibits the increase of cytosolic calcium levels and C-SRC and
fibrinogen receptor activation in ADP-stimulated platelets. Bonfitto PHL, Lopes-Pires ME, Goulart G, Naime ACA,
Bueno PI, Antunes E, Marcondes S Unicamp – Farmacologia
04.027 Gabapentin reduce pro-inflammatory parameters of the colitis induced by Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid
(TNBS) in rats. Magalhães DA1, Cruz Junior JS2, Dutra YM2, Brito TV1, Filgueiras MC2, Barbosa ALR2 1UFPI –
Biotecnologia, 2UFPI
04.029 Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of hydroalcoholic extract and polysaccharide fraction from
Thuja occidentalis in mice. Silva IS, Brito CFC, Sousa FBM, Carvalho NS, Araújo S, Souza LKM, Araújo TSL,
Pacífico DM, Filho ACML, Lima GM, Almendra RB, Medeiros JVR UFPI – Farmacologia
04.031 Does hydrogen sulfide (H2S) influence apoptosis process in lungs from allergic mice? Ribeiro MC1,
Mendes JA2, Silva MS1, Moreira GCP1, Dias NH1, Albaladejo BT1, Pereira JA1, Rocha T1, Ferreira HHA3 – 1USF,
2
Unicamp, 3SLMandic
04.033 Comparative study of anti-inflammatory activity of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata extracts.
Pereira CS1, Antunes E1, Sawaya ACHF2, Iwamoto RD1, Landucci ECT1 1FCM-Unicamp – Pharmacology, 2IBUnicamp – Plant Physiology
04.035 Human thioredoxin influences Candida albicans virulence in vitro. Silva BLR, Mendes SJF, Ferro TAF,
Grisotto MAG, Monteiro Neto V, Fernandes ES Universidade Ceuma – Biologia Parasitária
04.037 In vitro LPS-induced zymosan phagocytosis and inflammatory activity of murine peritoneal
macrophages are mediated by protease-activated receptor (PAR)2. Barra A, Siqueira MVA, Matos NA, Freitas
KM, Lopes MTP, Klein A ICB-UFMG – Farmacologia
04.039 Anti-inflammatory effect of low-level laser therapy and the role of nitric oxide in carragenan induced
edema. Cruz JSJ, Mazulo JCRN, Sousa NA, Queiroz FFSN, Brito TV, Barbosa ALR, Filgueiras MC UFPI –
Acadêmico
04.041 Nanocapsules increase alpha-bisabolol bioavailability in lung tissue and reduce acute pulmonary
inflammation induced by LPS in mice. D'Almeida APL, Ciambarella BT, Souza ET, Terroso T, Coutinho DS,
Gomes CR, Oliveira NS, Pohlmann AR, Guterres SS, Silva PMR, Martins MA, Bernardi A Fiocruz – Inflamação
04.043 Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity evaluation of oleoresin of Copaifera reticulata in animal
model. Almeida Jr J, Silva EBS, Moraes TMP, Oliveira ECP, Moraes WP ISCO-UFOPA
04.045 Effects of augmented O-Glcnacylation on activation and differentiation of macrophages. Zanotto CZ,
Olivon VC, Mestriner FLAC, Alves-Filho JC, Carneiro FS, Tostes RC FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
04.047 Proteolytic fraction from Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis latex stimulates macrophage activity against
inflammatory breast cancer cells. Braga AD1, Freitas KM1, Teixeira LCR1, Salas CE2, Lopes MTP1 1ICB-UFMG –
Farmacologia, 2ICB-UFMG – Biochemistry and Immunology
04.049 Irinotecan increases regulatory T Cells and Th17 cells in intestinal mucositis. Fernandes C, Wanderley
CWS, Muniz HA, Silva CMS, Teixeira MA, Souza NRP, Cândido AGF, Ribeiro RA, Lima-Júnior RCP UFC –
Fisiologia e Farmacologia
04.051 Evaluation of in vivo and in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Rubus imperialis extract and the isolated
compound Niga-Ichigoside F1. Tonin TD, Machado ID, Niero R, Petreanu M, Santin JR USP – Análises Clínicas
e Toxicológicas
04.053 Vascular changes and acute inflammation induced by agar in an air pouch model. Gomes MF, Avila
PES, Bastos GNT, Nascimento JLM ICB-UFPA
04.055 Effect of hydroethanolic extract of the xylopodium of Mandevilla longiflora (Desf.) Pichon on the
release of inflammatory mediators in murine macrophages stimulated. Almeida DAT, Cruz TCD, Rosa SIG,
Martins DTO UFMT – Ciências Básicas em Saúde
04.057 Mechanisms involved in the peripheral anti-inflammatory effect of tramadol into rat’s
temporomandibular joint. Lamana SMS, Nascimento APC, Napimoga MH, Araújo DR, Furtado FF, Macedo CG,
Clemente-Napimoga JT FOP-Unicamp – Ciências Fisiológicas
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
33
04.059 Topical formulation containing microencapsulated rutin reduces UVB irradiation-induced skin oxidative
stress and inflammation. Medeiros DC1, Martinez RM2, Mizokami SS3, Pinho-Ribeiro FA3, Georgetti SR2, Baracat
MM2, Verri Jr WA3, Casagrande R2 1UEM – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 2UEL – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 3UEL –
Ciências Patólogicas
04.061 Extracellular adenosine orchestrates sepsis-induced immunossupression through activation of A2a
receptor. Nascimento DC, Melo PH, Ferreira RG, Peres RS, Cunha FQ, Alves-Filho JC FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
05. Pain and Nociception Pharmacology
05.001 Curcumin targets different signaling pathways to reduce superoxide anion-induced hyperalgesia. Fattori
V1, Pinho-Ribeiro FA1, Borghi SM1, Alves-Filho JC2, Cunha TM2, Cunha FQ2, Casagrande R3, Verri Jr WA1 1UEL –
Ciências Patólogicas, 2FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 3UEL – Ciências Farmacêuticas
05.003 The role of pattern recognition receptors like toll-like receptors 4 in herpetic and post-herpetic
neuralgia. Silva CR1, Berlink J1, Raymondi J1, Cunha FQ1, Cunha TM1 1FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
05.005 4-HNE levels and TRPA1 expression vary with the severity of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Klug
RJ1, Mendes SJF2, Ferro TAF3, Paiva IC3, Lamha APSF4, Almeida LSB5, Silva MA1, Monteiro Neto V6, Muscará
MN7, Calixto JB8, Grisotto MAG2, Fernandes ES1,6 1Uniceuma – Odontologia, 2Uniceuma – Biologia Parasitária,
3
Uniceuma – BIONORTE, 4Unieuro – Odontologia, 5UFMA – Odontologia, 6Uniceuma – Biologia Parasitária, 7USP
– Farmacologia, 8CIENP
05.007 Anti-allodynic effect of nicotinamide in experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis. Dutra MMGB1,2,
Nascimento Jr EB3, Araújo DP4, Fátima A4, Machado RR2, Coelho MM2 1Centro Universitário Newton Paiva –
Farmacologia, 2UFMG – Farmacologia, 3UFPI – Farmacologia, 4UFMG – Química
05.009 The resveratrol peripheral antinociceptive effect is mediate by µ opioid receptor activation. Oliveira CC,
Costa AF, Duarte IDG, Perez AC, Santos SHS, Romero TRL UFMG – Farmacologia e Fisiologia
05.011 Antinociceptive effect of decoction extract H. crenata Pohl and possible mechanism involved. Donald
GR1, Giorno TBS1, Carvalho PR1, Fernandes PD1 – 1LaFDI-UFRJ – Farmacologia da Dor e da Inflamação
05.013 Effect of the selective TRPV4 channel antagonist on the scratching behavior in mice. Matias DO1, Alves
VS1, Fabiana DC1, Miranda ALP2, Costa R2 1UFRJ – Acadêmico, 2UFRJ – Ciências Farmacêuticas
05.015 Investigation of antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of naringenin in mice. Dallazen JL, Silva
CF1, Baggio CH, Werner MF UFPR – Farmacologia
05.017 Nitroxyl reduces chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in mice. Longhi Balbinot DT1,
Rossaneis AC1, Pinho-Ribeiro FA1, Bertozzi MM1, Casagrande R2, Katrina MM3, Verri Jr WA1 – 1UEL – Ciências
Patológicas, 2UEL – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 3University of Arizona – Química
05.019 Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-4 (TRPV4) channel in diabetic peripheral neuropathy in
mice. Dias FC, Alves VA, Matias DO, Silva RV, Santos BLR, Lima CKF, Miranda ALP, Costa R UFRJ –
Biotecnologia Farmacêutica
05.021 Evaluation of antinociceptive activity of methanolic fractions of sugarcane juice ( Saccharum officinarum
L.). Soares MA, Silva NLC, Gomes AC, Simas NK, Kuster RM, Miranda ALP, Tributino JLM – UFRJ
05.023 Inhibition of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor by PD176252 markedly prevents the chronic pruritus in
a mouse model of atopic dermatitis. Canevese FF, Machado GDB, Pereira PSJ, Campos MM PUCRS –
Farmacologia e Toxicologia
05.025 Evaluation of central and peripheral changes in different models of tooth pulp inflammation in rats.
Filippini HF1,2, Scalzilli PA1,3, Costa KM1,4, Freitas RDS1,4, Campos MM1,2,3,4 1PUCRS – Toxicologia e Farmacologia,
2
PUCRS – Odontologia, 3PUCRS – Odontologia, 4PUCRS – Medicina e Ciências da Saúde
05.027 Blockage of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor by PD176252 ameliorates acute and chronic pruritus in
mice. Machado GDB, Danesi GM, Pereira PJS, Campos MM PUCRS
05.029 Antinociceptive mechanisms of a lipid transfer protein isolated from noni seeds in mice. Campos
DCO1, Costa AS1, Rocha AD1, Carmo LD2, Alencar NMN2, Oliveira HD1 1UFC – Bioquímica, 2UFC – Fisiologia e
Farmacologia
05.031 Antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effect of γ-TPN in the model of sciatic nerve partial ligation. Passos
FFB, Piauilino CA, Lopes EM, Oliveira AP, Almeida FRC UFPI
05.033 Spinal cord mechanisms involved in Ehrlich cells-induced cancer pain. Zarpelon AC, Calixto-Campos C,
Verri Jr WA UEL – Ciências Patólogicas
05.035 Microglial Cells: no role in diabetes-induced hyponociception into rats TMJ. da Rocha LM, Muzilli A,
Freitas FF, Macedo CG, Abdalla HB, Bonfante R, Clemente-Napimoga JT FOP-Unicamp
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
06. Cardiovascular and Renal Pharmacology
06.001 Sarcoplasmic reticulum/plasmatic membrane interaction activated by ryanodine-sensitive calcium stores
in mice mesenteric artery. Garcia DCG1, Lemos VS2, Côrtes SF1 1UFMG – Farmacologia, 2UFMG – Fisiologia e
Biofísica
06.003 Role of aldosterone in the inflamassome activation in macrophages and Type 2 Diabetes. Ferreira NS1,
Pereira CA1, Zanotto CZ1, Carlos D2, Tostes RC1 1FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 2FMRP-USP – Imunologia
06.005 Mechanisms underlying diuretic effect of Gomphrena celosioides Mart. (Amaranthaceae). Vasconcelos
PCP1, Spessoto D1, Gasparotto Junior A1, Kassuya CAL1 1UFGD – Ciências da Saúde
06.009 Redox-sensitive phosphorylation of AKT and ENOS and nitric oxide pathways are involved in the
cardiovascular effects induced by northeastern Brazilian red wine from São Francisco river valley. Ribeiro TP1,2,
Oliveira AC1, Mendes-Junior LG1, Vasconcelos WP1, França KC3, Nakao LS3, Schini-Kerth V2, Medeiros IA1 1UFPB
– Ciências Farmacêuticas, 2Université de Strasbourg, 3UFPR – Patologia
06.011 Ethnopharmacological investigation of the diuretic and hemodynamic properties of native species of
the Brazilian biodiversity. Tirloni CAS1, Prando TBL2, Barboza LN3, Gasparotto FM1, Lourenço ELB2, Gasparotto
Junior A1 – 1UFGD – Ciências da Saúde, 2Unipar – Ciências Biológicas, 3UFPR – Ciências Farmacêuticas
06.013 Pharmacological characterization of the beta-3 agonist, mirabegron in platelets isolated from healthy
volunteer. Alexandre EMD, Silvério-Mendes CB, de Nucci G, Antunes E, Mónica FZ FCM-Unicamp – Farmacologia
06.015 Sodium nitrate attenuates the vascular effects and the hypotensive responses to sodium nitrite.
Angelis CD1, Oliveira-Paula GH2, Pinheiro LC2, Tanus-Santos JE2 1FCM-Unicamp, 2FMRP-USP
06.017 Omeprazole increases gastric ph and blunts the antihypertensive effects of sodium nitrite but not of
S-Nitrosoglutathione. Vilalva KH, Pinheiro LC, Ferreira GC, Oliveira GH, Portella RL, Tanus JE FMRP-USP –
Farmacologia
06.019 The venous endothelium: Cell cultures and the expression of Angiotensin II receptors. Torres TC,
Fernandes L Unifesp-Diadema
06.021 Antihypertensive effects of sodium nitrite are associated with prevention of hypertension-induced
increases in vascular MMP-2 and vascular remodeling. Rizzi E1, Guimaraes DA1, Conde-Tella SO1, Pinheiro LC1,
Gerlach RF2, Tanus-Santos JE1 1FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 2FORP-USP – Morfologia, Estomatologia e Fisiologia
06.023 Effects of the nytrosil complex cis-Ru (2,2’bipyridine)2(thiourea)(NO)] in systemic hemodynamics of
anesthetized normotensive rats. Cabral PHB1, Pessoa TO1, Sampaio TB1, Junior FSG2, Santos CF1, Fonteles
MC1, Lopes LGF2, Nascimento NRF1 – 1UECE – Fisiologia e Farmacologia, 2UFC – Química Biológica
06.025 Effects of barbinervic acid, A triterpene isolated from Eugenia punicifolia in rat thoracic aorta Teixeira
RGS1, Pascual R, Lima-Araújo KG1, Gandía L, Silva CLM2, Santos WC1 – 1UFF, 2UFRJ
06.027 Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition prevents loss of calponin-1 in
remodeling. Belo VA, Castro MM, Tanus-Santos JE FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
early
hypertensive vascular
06.029 Impaired relaxation of mesenteric artery to Nitric Oxide (NO) in rats with ligature-induced periodontitis.
Jesus FN1, Neto EAS1, Wenceslau CF2, Teixeira SA1, Costa SKP1, Muscará MN1 1ICB-USP – Farmacologia, 2ICBUSP – Fisiologia e Biofísica
06.031 Apocynin has higher potency than diapocynin to induce vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries
of Wistar rats. Troiano JA1, Potje SR1, Graton ME1, Silva DS1, Ximenes VF2, Antoniali C1 1FOA-Unesp – Ciências
Básicas, 2FCB-Unesp – Química
06.033 Involvement of rock and calcium in vasodilator response induced by Glyceryl Trinitrate (GTN) and
Tetrahydrofurfuryl Nitrate (NTHF) in human umbilical artery. Alustau-Fernandes MC1, Melo MP2, Silva TAF2,
Maciel PMP1, Machado NT1, Gomes SM3, Mendes-Junior LG1, Mendes-Neto JM4, Furtado FF5, Athayde-Filho PF1,
Medeiros IA1 1UFPB – Produtos Naturais Sintéticos e Bioativos., 2UFPB – Ciências da Saúde, 3Maternidade
Cândida Vargas, 4UFS – Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, 5UFCG – Escola Técnica de Saúde
06.035 Beta2-adrenoceptor is not essential for the response to environmental stress in the heart. Moura AL1,2,
Brum PC3, Cespedes IC4, Spadari RC1,2 1Unifesp – Farmacologia, 2Unifesp – Biociências, 3USP – Educação Física
e Esporte, 4Unifesp – Biociências
06.036 Alpha1beta1 and integrin-linked kinase interact and modulate Angiotensin II effects in vascular smooth
muscle cells. Moraes JA1, Frony AC1, Dias AM1, Renovato-Martins M1, Rodrigues G1, Marcinkiewicz C2, Assreuy
J3, Barja-Fidalgo C1 1UERJ – Biologia Celular e Molecular, 2Temple University, 3UFSC
06.037 Extract of Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels fruit peel reduces weight gain and improves vascular response
in rats with hypercaloric diet. Torres RA1, Silva TAF2, Maciel PMP3, Nascimento SM1, Cavalcante HC4, AlustauFernandes MC3, Medeiros IA3,2, Veras RC1,2 – 1PPGCN-UFPB, 2DCF-CCS-UFPB, 3PGPNSB-UFPB, 4UFPB – Nutrição
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
35
07. Endocrine, Reproductive and Urogenital Pharmacology
07.001 Mirabegron relaxes urethral smooth muscle by a dual mechanism involving β3-Adrenoceptor activation
and α1-adrenoceptor blockade. Alexandre EC1, Kiguti LR2, Calmasini FB1, Ferreira R3, Silva FH1, Silva KP2,
Ribeiro CA2, Mónica FZ1, Pupo AS2, Antunes E1 1FCM-Unicamp – Farmacologia, 2IBB-Unesp, 3FCM-Unicamp –
Hematologia e Hemoterapia
07.003 Androgen-induced changes in the expression of the β-defensin Spag11c during rat Wolffian duct
morphogenesis. Ribeiro CM1, Silva EJR2, Thimoteo DS1, Hinton BT3, Avellar MCW1 – 1Unifesp-EPM –
Farmacologia, 2Unesp – Farmacologia, 3University of Virginia – Cell Biology
07.005 Local cytokine responses to LPS or LTA in a rat model of acute epididymitis. Silva EJR1,2, Ribeiro CM2,
Avellar MCW2 1Unesp – Farmacologia, 2Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia
07.007 Corticosterone control of pineal gland nuclear factor kappa B-related genes couples rest/activity to
light/dark rhythm. da Silveira Cruz-Machado S1,2, Tamura EK1, Carvalho-Sousa CE1, Cecon E1, Fernandes PA1,
Markus RP1 1IB-USP – Cronofarmacologia
08. Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Pharmacology
08.001 JME-209 I: A novel orally active mexiletine analogue exhibiting antispasmodic properties – mechanism
of action and translation to an animal model of bronchoconstriction. Carvalho KIM1, Oliveira MTP1, Coutinho
DS1, Silva ET2, Costa JCS2, Faria RX3, Silva PMR1, Martins MA1 1Fiocruz – Inflammation, 2Farmanguinhos-Fiocruz,
3
Fiocruz – Cellular Communication
08.003 Simvastatin protects against alendronate-induced gastric mucosal injury in mice. Carvalho NS, Souza
LKM, Sousa NA, Araújo TSL, Silva MM, Silva IS, Costa DS, Lima Filho ACM, Almendra RB, Medeiros JVR UFPI –
Farmacologia
08.005 Gastroprotective activity and related mechanisms of p-Cymene (p-isopropyltoluene). Paulo LL, Sales IRP,
Formiga RO, Nascimento RF, Machado FDF, Lima GRM, Sobral MV, Batista LM – UFPB
08.007 Involvement of TRPV1 receptor in plasma extravasation in trachea and bronchi of rats treated with
angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. Oliveira JRJM, André E UFPR – Farmacologia
08.009 Pre-clinical evaluation of intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of three Brazilian medicinal species:
Achyrocline satureoides, Maytenus robusta and Rubus imperialis. Farias JAM1, da Silva LM1, Somensi LB1, Cury
BJ1, Santin JR1, Niero R1, Andrade SF1 1Univali – Pharmaceutical Sciences
08.011 D-cysteine protects gastric mucosa by an independent mechanism of Cystathionine γ-Lyase and Damino acid oxidase. Araújo TSL1, Souza LKM2, Nicolau LAD3, Costa DS4, Sousa NA1, Sousa FBM1, Carvalho NS4,
Silva IS4, Pacífico DM1, Medeiros JVR1,2,4 1UFPI – Biotecnologia, 2UFPI – Ciências Biomédicas, 3UFC –
Farmacologia, 4UFPI – Farmacologia
08.013 Gastroprotective effect of diminazene aceturate: role of ACEII/Ang(1-7)/MAS pathway in gastric injury
models in mice. Souza LKM1, Nicolau LAD2, Araújo TSL2, Costa DS2, Sousa NA2, Sousa FBM2, Silva IS2, Pacífico
DM2, Medeiros JVR1 – 1UFPI – Ciências Biomédicas, 2UFPI
08.015 Antidiarrheal activity of Maytenus erythroxylon Reissek (Celastraceae) in mice. Formiga RO, Sales IRP,
Nascimento RF, Lima GRM, Quirino ZGM, Tavares JF, Batista LM – UFPB
08.017 Rutin reduces abdominal hyperalgesia and pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis induced by L Arginine in mice. Teixeira DF1, Camargo EA1, Abreu FF1, Souza ACA1, Costa SKP2, Muscará MN2, Teixeira SA2,
Oliveira JP1 1UFS – Ciências Fisiológicas, 2USP – Farmacologia
08.019 Ethanol-impaired hepatic and gastric function: benefits with Baccharis trimera extract. Lívero FAR1, Silva
LM1, Ferreira DM1, Beltrame OC2, Werner MFP1, Acco A1 1UFPR – Farmacologia, 2UFPR – Medicina Veterinária
09. Natural Products and Toxinology
09.001 Rhamnogalacturonan as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. MariaFerreira D1, Borato DG1, da Silva LM, Corso CR1, Nascimento AM2, Cipriani TR2, Watanabe PS3, Santana DMG3,
van den Wijngaard RM, Werner MFP1, Baggio CH1 – 1UFPR – Farmacologia, 2UFPR – Bioquímica, 3UEM
09.003 Involvement of muscarinic and bradykinin receptors in the prolonged diuretic properties of Echinodorus
grandiflorus and its relation to the prostaglandin and nitric oxide pathway. Tirloni ACS1, Prando TBL2, Barboza
LN3, Gasparotto FM1, Lourenço ELB2, Gasparotto Junior A1 1UFGD – Farmacologia e Toxicologia de Produtos
Naturais, 2Unipar – Farmacologia e Toxicologia de Produtos Naturais, 3UFPR – Farmacologia
09.005 Development of skin wound healing treatment: focus on Passiflora mucronata plant extract. Figueiredo
J1, Castro AB1, Barreto A1, Silva ICV2, Calheiros AS3, Ferreira AC3, Frutuoso VS3, Muzitano MF1, Leal ICR2,
Bonavita AG1 1UFRJ-Macaé, 2UFRJ – Produtos Naturais e Alimentos, 3Fiocruz – Imunofarmacologia
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
09.007 Anti-inflammatory effect of crude extract of S. hispidus’s skin in allergic pleurisy murine model induced
by ovalbumin. Muylaert FF1, Chaves AS1, Fernandes LDA2, Ferraris FK1, Amendoeria FC1 – 1Fiocruz –
Farmacologia e Toxicologia, 2IEAPM –Oceanografia
09.009 Anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of Euterpe oleracea Mart. (Açaí) extract in Type
2 Diabetic Rats. The exercise training potentiates these effects? Bem GF, Costa CA, Santos IB, Cordeiro VSC,
Carvalho LCRM, Souza MAV, Costa GF, Okinga A, Rocha APM, Ognibene DT, Resende AC, Moura RS UERJ –
Farmacologia e Psicobiologia
09.011 Antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and gastroprotective effects of polysaccharides of Croton cajucara
Benth. in rodents. Souza EFJ1, Werner MFP1, Nascimento AM2, Cipriani TR2 – 1UFPR – Farmacologia, 2UFPR –
Farmacologia Bioquímica e Molecular
09.013 Investigation of gastroprotector potential of Vernonia condensata Baker, a Brazilian medicinal plant
used in the treatment of gastric ulcer. Boeing T, da Silva LM, Somensi LB, Petreanu M, Niero R, Santin JR,
Andrade SF – Univali – Ciências Farmacêuticas
09.015 The influence of calcium channels on vasorelaxant effect of (-)-borneol in superior mesenteric artery
of l-name hipertensive rats. Souza FM, Silva-Filho JC, Azevedo PSS, Campelo RT, Rocha MS, Santos MEP, Lima
GS, Snatos MRV, Oliveira AP NPPM-UFPI
09.017 Antidiarrheal activity of a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from seaweed Gracilaria caudata in
rodents. Costa DS1, Sousa NA2, Souza LKM2, Araújo TSL2, Sousa FBM2, Carvalho NS1, Nogueira KM3, Araújo S3,
Oliveira AP3, Medeiros JVR1,2 1UFPI – Farmacologia, 2UFPI – Biotecnologia, 3UFPI
09.019 Gastroprotective effect of ethanolic extract of Samanea tubulosa on naproxen-induced gastric damage
in mice. Nogueira KM1, Souza LKM2, Pacífico DM1, Araújo TSL3, Costa DS4, Sousa NA3, Sousa FBM3, Medeiros
JVR2,3, Sales PAB1, Costa APR1, Nicolau LAD5 1UFPI, 2UFPI – Ciências Biomédicas, 3UFPI – Biotecnologia, 4UFPI –
Farmacologia, 5UFC – Farmacologia
09.021 Lipid-lowering and antiatherogenic effects of Cuphea carthagenensis (JACQ.) J.F. Macbr. in rabbits.
Barboza LN1, Dalsenter PR1, Prando TBL2, Ribeiro RCL2, Lourenço ELB2, Gasparotto Junior A3 1UFPR –
Farmacologia, 2Unipar – Farmacologia, 3UFGD – Farmacologia
09.022 Acute toxicity and gastroprotective activity of Wissadula periplocifolia L. (Malvaceae) in mice. Silva
AKM, Barros MEFX, Sales IRP, Formiga RO, Teles YCF, Souza MFV, Batista LM UFPB
09.023 Effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of Croton antisyphiliticus oxidative stress in mice with prehypertension induced by L-Name. Deus FA1, Melo DS2, Costa KB2, Gregório LE3, Rocha EV2, Santos CFF1
1
UFVJM – Fisiologia e Farmacologia, 2UFVJM, 3Unifesp
09.025 Involvement of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and cyclooxygenase metabolites in the contraction of rat
isolated ileum and stomach by Lachesis muta muta (South American Bushmaster) venom. Stroka A1, Dias L1,
Sousa NC1, Melgarejo A2, Hyslop S1 1Unicamp – Farmacologia Básica e Clinica, 2Instituto Vital Brazil – Zoologia
Médica
09.027 Effect of Patchouli Essential Oil ( Pogostemon cablin) on chemotaxis of leukocytes in vitro. Silva-Filho
SE1, Aguiar RP1, Uchida NS1, Wiirzler LAM1, Rodrigues PJ1, Cardia GFE1, Cavalcante HAO2, Bersani-Amado CA1,
Cuman RKN1 1UEM – Farmacologia e Terapêutica, 2FITL – Farmácia
09.029 Cardiovascular responses to Bothropstoxins I and II, Phospholipases A2 from Bothrops jararacussu
(Jararacuçu) snake venom. Rodrigues MAP, Dias L, Smaal A, Rennó AL, Lorenzetti R, Sousa NC, Panunto PC,
Inoue BR, Hyslop S Unicamp – Farmacologia
09.033 Gastroprotective effect of rosmarinic acid against NSAIDs and cold restrain stress induced ulcers in
mice. Nascimento RF, Machado FDF, Sales IRP, Barbosa-Filho JM, Batista LM UFPB – Ciências Farmacêuticas
09.035 Friedelin enhances angiogenesis and accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice. Correia ACC1, Carmo
JOS1, Lima DJ1, Aquino FLT1, Ferro JNS1, Broetto L1, Conserva LM1, Martins MA2, Silva PMR2, Barreto E1 1UFAL,
2
Fiocruz
09.037 Therapeutic potential of sulfated polysaccharide fraction extracted from seaweed Hypnea musciformis
on acute and secretory diarrhea in rodents. Sousa NA1, Souza LKM2, Araújo TSL2, Costa DS2, Carvalho NS2,
Nogueira KM2, Sousa FBM2, Leódido ACM2, Araújo S2, Campos MS2, Medeiros JVR1 1UFPI – Biotecnologia, 2UFPI
09.039 Sulfated polysaccharide fraction from marine algae Gracilaria caudata reduces mechanical
hypernociception and inflammation during experimental arthritis in mice. Bingana RD1, Silva RO1, Oliveira FFB1,
Sousa FBM2, Carmo LD1, Chaves LS3, Barros FCN3, Ribeiro RA1, Barbosa ALR2, Freitas ALP3, Soares PMG4,
Souza MHLP1, Medeiros JVR2 1UFC – Farmacologia, 2UFPI – Biotecnologia, 3UFC – Bioquímica, 4UFC –
Morfologia
09.041 Antinociceptive and antidepressant-like effects of the Vitex megapotamica in rats. Rubin MA1, Hamann
FR1, Rossato MF1, Mello CF2 1UFSM – Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, 2UFSM – Farmacologia e Fisiologia
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
37
09.043 Extract assessment Allium cepa L. in diabetic rats streptozotocin-induced. Lemos LIC1, Medeiros MA1,
Silva FS1, Abreu BA1, Bortolin RH1, Meira KV1, Rezende AA1, Figueiredo CAV2, Oliveira T2, Medeiros KCP1 1UFRN,
2
UFBA
09.045 Use of Tibouchina granulosa tea wound healing of diabetic mice. Sobrinho AP1, Amorim JL1, Ferreira
LLC2, Fernandes PD3 – 1UFRJ – Laboratório de Farmacologia da Dor e Inflamação, 2Instituto Vital Brazil –
Fitoterápicos, 3UFRJ – Farmacologia e Inflamação
09.047 Hypolipidemic effect of a grape skin extract of Vitis vinifera (ACH09) in C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat
diet. Santos IB, da Costa GF, Costa CA, de Bem GF, Cordeiro VSC, Soares de Moura R, Resende AC UERJ –
Farmacologia e Psicobiologia
09.049 Effect of methanolic extract, fractions and sub-fractions of Garcinia achachairu on the blood pressure
of anesthetized rats. Januário AGF1,2, Peruzzo MM2, Mariano LNB3, Niero R3, Nardi GM2,1 1Unoesc –
Biotecnologia, 2Unoesc – Farmacologia, 3Univali – Ciências Farmacêuticas
09.051 A new perspective for F(ab’)2 antibodies fragments on Venom:Antivenom Analysis using SE-HPLC.
Collaço RCO1, Randazzo-Moura P2, Cogo JC3, Sanny CG4, Rodrigues-Simioni L1 1Unicamp – Farmacologia,
2
PUCSP – Farmacologia, 3UNIVAP –Estudos da Natureza, 4Oklahoma State University – Biochemistry and
Microbiology
09.053 Gastroprotective activity of Cissampelos sympodialis Eichl. (Menispermaceae) involves the maintenance
of reduced glutathione levels. Sales IRP, Pessoa MMB, Nascimento RF, Formiga RO, Machado FDF, BarbosaFilho JM, Batista LM UFPB – Ciências Farmacêuticas
09.055 Polysaccharide fraction isolated from Passiflora edulis inhibits the inflammatory response and the
oxidative stress in mice. Sousa FBM1, Silva RO2, Damasceno SRB2, Brito TV1, Fontenele AM1, Braúna IS1, Junior
JSC1, Maciel JS3, de Paula RCM3, Freitas ALP3, Medeiros JVR1, Silva DC4, Barbosa ALR1 1UFPI – Biotecnologia,
2
UFC – Farmacologia, 3UFC – Bioquímica, 4UNIVASF
09.057 The role of kinin system in Lonomia obliqua – induced acute kidney injury: contribution of bradykinin
B1 receptor, coagulation system activation and vascular alterations. Berger M1, Beys-da-Silva WO2, Santi L2,
Moraes JA3, Marcon R4, Vieira MAR5, Yates JR6, Calixto JB4, Barja-Fidalgo C3, Guimarães JA1 1HCPA-UFRGS,
2
Univates – Biotecnologia, 3UERJ – Biologia Celular, 4UFSC – Farmacologia, 5UFMG – Fisiologia e Biofísica, 6The
Scripps Research Institute – Chemical Physiology
09.059 Evaluation of acute toxicity and hypoglycemic effect of Amasonia campestris in animal model.
Nascimento AA, Guimarães Junior BS, Alvez CM, Ribeiro RB, Santos AM Unifap – Experimentação Animal
09.061 Evaluation of the gabaergic system in the anesthetic effect of S-(+)-Linalool in silver catfish ( Rhamdia
quelen) evaluation of the gabaergic system in the anesthetic effect of S-(+)-linalool in silver catfish ( Rhamdia
quelen). Bianchini AE1, Garlet QI1, Silva LL, Heinzmann B2, Baldisserotto B1 1UFSM – Farmacologia e Fisiologia,
2
UFSM – Farmácia Industrial
09.063 Antinociceptive activity of extracts and secondary metabolites of Renealmia alpinia. Benjumea D1,
Cortés N2, Osorio E2, León F3, Cutler S3, Gómez-Betancur I1 – 1Universidad de Antioquia –
Ofidismo/Escorpionismo 2Universidad de Antioquia – Investigación en Sustancias Bioactivas 3The University of
Mississippi – BioMolecular Sciences
10. Cancer Pharmacology
10.001 Evaluation of Eugenol anticancer activity by regulation of the oncogenic transcription factor Forkhead
Box M1. Wiirzler LAW1, Aguiar RP1, Silva-Filho SE1, Rodrigues PJ1, Cardia GFE1, Uchida NS1, Velázquez-Martínez
CA2, Bersani-Amado CA1, Cuman RKN1 – 1UEM, 2University of Alberta
10.003 Cytotoxic effect of Telocinobufagin on H460 lung cancer cells. Rendeiro MM1, Azevedo SV2, Fernandes
J2, Cunha-Filho GSA1, Noël F1, Quintas LEM 1 – 1UFRJ – Farmacologia, 2UFRJ – Ciências Morfológicas e
Fisiológicas
10.005 In vitro evaluation of quinoxaline-derived chalcones associated with standard chemotherapies in oral
squamous cell carcinoma. Mielcke TR1, Erig TC2, Chiela EC3, Kist LW4, Mascarello A5, Chiaradia LD5, Bogo MR6,
Nunes RJ5, Campos MM1 – 1PUCRS – Medicine and Health Sciences, 2PUCRS – Pharmacy, 3UFRGS – Hepatology
and Gastroenterology, 4PUCRS – Genomics and Molecular Biology, 5UFSC – Chemistry, 6PUCRS – Cell and
Molecular Biology
10.007 Role of endogenous glucocorticoids in diabetes-induced
metastases. Araújo AF1, Carvalho VF2, Diaz BL1 1UFRJ, 2Fiocruz
increase
in
B16F10
melanoma
lung
11. Pharmacokinetics and Toxicology
11.001 Toxic effects of OMC administration during development of rats in lactational period. Barbosa E,
Savignon T, Ferraris FK, Chaves AS, Muylaert FF, Rodrigues SA, Brito TM, Amendoeira FC Fiocruz –
Farmacologia e Toxicologia
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
11.003 Evaluation of potential toxicity of hydroethanolic extract of Terminalia argentea Mart Leaves. Beserra
AMSS, Martins DTO UFMT – Ciências Básicas em Saúde
11.005 Development a diabetic model with streptozotocin in Wistar rats applied to a microdialysis study.
Izolan JS, Braga A, Lima DMF, Araújo BV UFRGS
11.007 A post-marketing study of pharmacokinetic bioequivalence between commercial generic and reference
amoxicillin in rats. Mattos LIS, Ferraris FK, Brito TM, Chaves AS, Martins HF, Pinto DP, Silva DMD, Amendoeira
FC. LAB-SEFAR-Fiocruz
11.009 Evaluation of the effects of mangiferin nanocapsules on hematological parameters in wistar rats.
Garcez RA, Carmo GM, Raffin R, Fontana BD, Borin DB, Vaucher RA, Rech VC Centro Universitário Franciscano
11.011 Characterization of a cryptococcal meningitis model in male Wistar rats. Lock GA, Alves IA, Araújo BV
UFRGS
11.013 Plasma pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in obese and non-obese rats after intravenous dosing. Palma
EC1, Laureano JV1, Lima DMF2, Araújo BV3, Dalla Costa T3 – 1UFRGS – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 2UFRGS –
Farmácia, 3UFRGS – Farmácia
11.015 Comparison of free subcutaneous tissue concentrations of cefazolin in obese and non-obese rats
determined by microdialysis. Laureano JV1, Palma EC1, Lima DMF2, Dalla Costa T1, Araújo BV1 – 1UFRGS –
Ciências Farmacêuticas, 2UFRGS – Farmácia
12. Pharmacogenomics, Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Pharmacology
12.001 Impact of Arginase 1 and Arginase 2 on erectile dysfunction risk and disability. Lacchini R1, Blanco
ALF2, Muniz JJ1, Nobre YTDA3, Cologna AJ3, Martins ACP3, Tanus-Santos JE2 1EERP-USP – Enfermagem
Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas, 2FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 3FMRP-USP – Cirurgia
12.003 Endothelin-1 production and expression of micrornas in preeclamptic patients responsive and
nonresponsive to antihypertensive therapy in an in vitro model of preeclampsia. Dias MC, Sandrim VC,
Bovolato ALC, Deffune E IBB-Unesp
13. Drug Discovery and Development
13.001 Screening for carcinoma cell lines confirmed a hit in drug discovery. Antunes JE1, Pereira MBM2,
Ribeiro RT1 1UFJF – Farmácia, 2UFJF – Ciências Básicas em Saúde
13.003 Layered double hydroxides with intercalated indomethacin: Antinociceptive study and gastroprotective
effect. Bentes-Lima A1, Dias DRC1, Queiroz-Santos GC2, França CM1, Anicete-Santos M3, Nascimento JLM3,
Bastos GNT2 1UFPA – Biotecnologia, 2UFPA – Neurociências, 3UFPA
13.005 Development, characterization and evaluation of naringin and naringenin nanocapsules-induced
cytotoxicity. Ferreira CF1, Cordenonsi LM2, Sulczewski FB3, Liszbinski RB3, Rodrigues LJ1, Boeck CR1, Raffin RP1
1
Unifra – Nanociências, 2UFRGS – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 3Unifra – Biomedicina
13.007 Novel partial agonist of PPAR-gamma (LASSBio-1773) reduces neuropathic pain in diabetic rats. Araujo
JSC, Dias JL, de Silva JS, Trachez MM, Delgobbo MS, Silva TF, Lima LM, Barreiro EJ, Sudo RT, Zapata-Sudo G
UFRJ – Farmacologia e Química Medicinal
13.009 LFQM 75: New lead compound for Alzheimer’s disease treatment. Souza INO1, Pereira TS1, Boni MS1,
da Silva FMR1, Viegas Jr C2, Castro NG1, Neves G1 1ICB-UFRJ, 2Unifal
13.011 Evaluation of plant extracts and synthetic compounds on secretion of insulin from langerhans islets.
Iwamoto RD, Borck PC, Lubaczeuski C, Pereira CS, Sawaya ACHF, Landucci ECT, de Nucci G Unicamp –
Farmacologia
13.013 Antitumor activity of the fractions containing three-finger toxins from the venom of the Micrurus
lemniscatus (American Elapidic Snake): prospection of new molecules with specific pharmacology targets.
Donato MF, Santos AK, Rios JPP, Batista-Filho FL, Pimenta AMC, Resende RR, de Lima ME UFMG – Bioquímica
e Imunologia
14. Pharmacology Education and Technology
14.001 Realist simulation using a patient simulator: a tool to integrate central nervous system pharmacology
teachings to clinical features. Silva JLV, Morioka CY, Marcos RL, Duran CCG, Gallotti RMD Uninove – Ciências
da Saúde
15. Pharmacology: Others
15.001 Activation of δPKC and AKT mediates inhibition of platelet aggregation of rats 6h after
lipopolysaccharide injection. Frade-Guanaes JO1, Lopes-Pires ME, Marcondes S1, Antunes E2 1Unicamp –
Farmacologia, 2Unicamp – Farmacologia e Inflamação
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
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15.003 Pharmacological activity extract ethanolic Cyperus articulatus var. Nodosus. Silva EBS1, Machado IR2,
Barata LES2, Arévalo MR2, Silva AS2, Vieira LQ3, Castro W3, Ruiz ALTG4, Torre AD4, Castro KCF2, Moraes WP1 –
1
UFOPA – Farmacologia, 2UFOPA – Produtos Naturais Bioativos, 3UFMG – Gnotobiologia e Imunologia, 4CPQBAUnicamp
15.005 Unfractionated heparin effect on wound healing. Nascimento AS1, Borges PA2, Nogueira TA1, Gomes
JPM1, Garcia TA1, Calil-Elias S1 1UFF – Farmácia, 2UFRJ – Farmacologia e Química Medicinal
40
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Poster Session 2 – 01/10/2015 (Even Numbers)
01. Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology
01.002 Age-related adaptive effects of intermittent fasting during neuroinflammation. Vasconcelos AR1, Yshii
LM1, Kinoshita PF1, Böhmer AE1, Orellana AMM1, de Sá Lima L1, Alves R1, Andreotti DZ1, Marcourakis T1, Viel
TA1, Buck HS2, Mattson MP3, Scavone C1, Kawamoto EM1 1USP, 2Santa Casa de São Paulo, 3NIH
01.004 Modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced immune response in raw 267.4 macrophages: role of insulin
and cholecalciferol. Bella LM1, Tessaro FHG1, Nolasco EL1, Ayala TS1, Azevedo CB2, Martins JO1 1FCF-USP –
Análises Clínicas, 2Unifesp-EPM – Disciplina de Reumatologia
01.006 Extracellular cyclic AMP: “third messenger” activity in vas deferens contraction? Moro RP, Pacini ESA,
Godinho RO Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia
01.008 Fast dissociation of LASSBio-579 and its p-Hydroxylated derivative at the Dopamine D2 receptor.
Monte FM1, Pompeu TET1, Bosier B, Fraga CAM2, Menegatti R3, Noël F1 1UFRJ – Farmacologia Bioquímica e
Molecular, 2UFRJ, 3UFG
01.010 Effects of the anti-aging hormone Klotho on AKT/FoxO signaling in the central nervous system.
Mazucanti C, Cararo M, Sala T, Yshii LM, Scavone C USP – Ciências Biomédicas
01.012 Heterogeneous population of alpha-1 adrenoceptors in abdominal aorta of male and female rats. Silva
KP, Pupo AS IBB-Unesp – Farmacologia
01.014 Adenosine A2A receptor plays a key role in lung fibroblast proliferation and activation triggered by IL13 in vitro. Sá YAPJ, Ciambarella BT, Martins MA, Silva PMR Fiocruz – Inflamação
01.016 L6 myogenic cell line as a skeletal muscle model for analysis of anti-catabolic drugs. Eloi FR, Funke
MG, Godinho RO Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia
01.018 P2X7 and vanilloid-associated pores: Common events in murine peritoneal macrophages? Ferreira LGB1,
de Melo Reis RA2, Henriques-Pons A1, Alves LA1, Faria RX1 1Fiocruz, 2UFRJ
02. Neuropharmacology
02.002 Quantitative changes of amino acid transmitters in the brain of dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice.
Frangiotti MIB1, Silva JDP1, Castro Neto EF2, Sousa PVV2, Naffah-Mazzacoratti MG3, Souccar C1 1Unifesp-EPM –
Pharmacology, 2Unifesp-EPM Neurology and Neurosurgery, 3Unifesp-EPM – Biochemistry
02.004 Selective blockade of EP1 and EP3 receptors attenuate pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice.
Marafiga JR1, Reschke CR1, Jesse AC1, Masson CJ1, Lenz QF1, Mello CF1 – 1UFSM – Farmacologia e Fisiologia
02.006 Celecoxib decreases proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex after
pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice. Temp FR1, Marafiga JR1, Jesse AC1, Milanesi LH1, Hessel AT1,
Rambo LM1, Mello CF1 1UFSM – Fisiologia e Farmacologia
02.008 Protocols to study modulation of long-term excitatory synaptic plasticity in hippocampal slices. Paiva
KV1, Santana PHDAS2, Castro NG2 1UFRJ – Farmácia, 2UFRJ
02.010 Evaluation of the protective effect of Simvastatin nanocapsules on seizures induced by quinolinic acid
in rats. Guerino CB1, Alves BC2, Thumé L3, Cardoso PA4, Cardoso MM4, Boeck CR1 1Unifra – Nanociências,
2
UFRGS – Bioquímica e Farmacologia, 3Unifra – Acadêmico
02.012 Effect of ketamine on the improvement of depressive-like behavior and memory loss in animal model
of Parkinson’s disease induced by 6-OHDA. Vecchia DD1, Wendler E1, Kanazawa LKS1, Hocayen PAS1, Miyoshi
E2, Andreatini R1 1UFPR – Farmacologia, 2UEPG – Ciências Farmacêuticas
02.014 Morphine impairs the persistence of memory via a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway. Milanesi LH, Porto
GP, Signor C, Funck VR, Rubin MA, Mello CF UFSM – Fisiologia e Farmacologia
02.016 Effect of acute and subcronic nimesulide treatment on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in
mice. Köche EM1, Temp FR1, Marafiga JR1, Jesse AC1, Hessel AT1, Milanesi LH1, Rambo LM1, Mello CF2 – 1UFSM
– Farmacologia e Fisiologia, 2UFSM – Fisiologia e Farmacologia
02.018 Quercetin did not reverse methylphenidate-induced hyperlocomotion, an animal model of mania.
Kanazawa LKS, de Mélo ML, Beirão Júnior PS, Barcaro IMR, Andreatini R UFPR – Farmacologia
02.022 Evaluation of voluntary running effects in metabolism and neurogenesis in female mice during
pregnancy and breast-feeding. Andreotti DZ, Cabral-Costa JV, de Sá Lima L, Kawamoto EM, Scavone C ICBUSP – Farmacologia
03. Psychopharmacology
03.002 Paroxetine potentiates antinociceptive process induced by chemical stimulation of ventrolateral
periaqueductal gray matter. Biagioni AF, Santos GHR, Coimbra NC FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
41
03.004 Intra-dorsal periaqueductal gray injection of noradrenaline induces anxiolytic-like effect in the elevated
T maze. Carvalho JJV1, Souza DO2, Martins JM1, de Bortoli VC1,2 1UFES – Bioquímica e Farmacologia, 2UFES –
Ciências Farmacêuticas
03.006 Rapid and sustained anticompulsive effect of ketamine in mice submitted to the marble burying test.
Tosta CL, Silote GP1, Souza MM2, Soares FRC1, Joca SRL3, Beijamini V4,5 1UFES – Bioquímica e Farmacologia,
2
UFES – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 3FCFRP-USP, 4UFES – Bioquímica e Farmacologia, 5UFES – Ciências da Saúde
03.008 50-kHz USV calls as a marker for mania in a sleep deprivation model. Wendler E1, Dalla Vecchia D1,
Kanazawa LKS1, de Souza CP1, Hocayen PAS1, Schwarting RKW2, Andreatini R1 1UFPR – Farmacologia, 2PhilippsUniversity of Marburg
03.010 Cocaine oral self-administration and GABA-A receptor subunits in a rat model of ADHD. Umpierrez L1,
Gonçales T1, Kimura K1, Costa P1, de Souza MF, Barros HMT4 1DFC-UFCSPA, 2UFCSPA – Farmacociências
04. Inflammation and Immunopharmacology
04.002 Quercetin therapeutically attenuates silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. Guimarães FV, Ferreira
TPT, Ciambarella BT, Arantes ACS, Azevedo RB, Martins MA, Silva PMR Fiocruz
04.004 Corticosterone and Zymosan modulation of melatonin production in RAW 264.7 macrophage lineage.
Silva DS, Almeida RKG, Pires-Lapa MA, Markus RP, Fernandes PACM IB-USP – Fisiologia
04.006 ADP treatment improves wound healing in diabetic mice. Borges PA1, Brogliato AR1, Figueiredo JB1,
Meyer-Fernandes JR2, Neves SJ1, Benjamim CF1 1ICB-UFRJ – Farmacologia e Química Medicinal, 2IBqM-UFRJ
04.008 Effect of gold nanoparticles on pulmonary inflammation caused by silica particles in mice. Ciambarella
BT, Ribeiro NBS, Arantes ACS, Serra MF, Azevedo RB, Fernandes AJM, Martins MA, Silva PMR Fiocruz –
Inflamação
04.010 Annexin A1 (ANXA-1)-mimetic peptide controls the inflammatory and fibrotic effects induced by house
dust mite (HDM) in mice. Ferreira TPT1, Souza ET1, Trentin PG1, Silva TV1, Castro GC1, Arantes ACS1, Flower R2,
Perretti M2, Martins MA1, Silva PMR1 – 1Fiocruz, 2WHRI – Biochemical Pharmacology
04.012 Evaluation of the TLR7 partial agonist TMX-302 as anti-inflammatory and antiasthmatic agent in
murine models of lung respiratory diseases. Ghilosso-Bortolini R1, Ferreira TP1, Arantes AC1, Silva PMR1, Maj R2,
Martins MA1 1Fiocruz – Farmacologia e Inflamação, 2Telormedix SA
04.014 Effects of Resolvin D1 on the allergic eosinophilic inflammation in obese mice. Tavares EBG, Calixto
MC, André DM, Antunes E FCM-Unicamp – Farmacologia
04.016 Anti-inflammatory activity of tyrosol salicylate derivatives. Aguiar RP1, Wiirzler LAM1, Silva-Comar FMS1,
Rodrigues PJ1, Cardia GFE1, Silva-Filho SE1, Uchida NS1, Rocha BA1, Velázquez-Martínez CA2, Cuman RKN1 1UEM
– Farmacologia, 2University of Alberta – Ciências Farmacêuticas
04.018 Modulation of pathways of the resolution of inflammation following hydroalcoholic crude extract from
Casearia sylvestris (HCE-CS) application in experimental complex regional pain syndrome –Type I (CRPS-I).
Piovezan AP1,3,2, Batisti AP3, Benevides MLACS3, Lenfers BT4, Fausto LSL3, Martins DF3, Seed M2, Headland SE2,
Cooper D2, Souza PS2, Perretti M2 1PPGCS, 2WHRI, 3LaNex-Unisul, 4LaNDI-UFSC
04.020 Involvement of 11-bHSD-1/2 in altered inflammatory response pattern presented by undernourished
offspring. Vaz DBR1, Balbino AM1, Akamine EH2, Carvalho MHC2, Landgraf RG1, Landgraf MA2,1 1Unifesp-Diadema
– Inflamação e Farmacologia Vascular, 2USP – Farmacologia
04.022 Immunomodulatory properties of Braylin from Z. tingoassuiba Espírito Santo RF1, Meira CS2, Costa RS3,
Souza Filho OP3, Velozo ES3, Soares MBP2, Villarreal CF1 1UFBA – Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental,
2
CPqGM-LETI-Fiocruz-BA, 3UFBA – Pesquisa em Matéria Médica
04.024 Role of leptin receptor and TLR-4 in reduced acute lung inflammation, in intrauterine undernourished
mice model. Balbino AM1, Fernandes L1, Landgraf MA1,2, Landgraf RG1 1Unifesp-Diadema – Inflamação e
Farmacologia Vascular, 2USP – Farmacologia
04.026 Role of atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 (D6) in the lung inflammatory response caused by silica
particles in mice. Pereira JG1, Dias DF1, Ferreira TPT1, Azevedo RB1, Teixeira MM2, Graham G3, Martins MA1,
Silva PMR1 1Fiocruz – Fisiologia e Farmacodinâmica, 2UFMG – Farmacologia, 3University of Glasgow – Infection,
Immunity and Inflammation,
04.028 Reduction of mast cell number and reactivity induced by glucocorticoids is associated with upregulation of advanced glycation end-products receptors expression. Santoro T1, Torres RC1,2, Insuella DBR1,
Martins MA1, Silva PMR1, Carvalho VF1 – 1Fiocruz, 2UFRJ
04.030 Anti-inflammatory activity of low power laser in classic experimental model of paw oedema acute in
mice. Batista JA, Brito TV, Queiroz FFSN, Lima Filho ACM, Almendra RB, Macêdo WBS, Costa MS, Barbosa
ALR, Filgueiras MC UFPI – Farmacologia
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
04.032 L-amino acid oxidase from Bothrops jararaca snake venom increases vascular permeability in rat
dorsal skin: involvement of free radicals. Fonseca FV, Marcelino EP, Pereira BB, Panunto PC, Torres Huaco FD,
da Silva RF, Hyslop S FCM-Unicamp – Biochemical Pharmacology
04.034 Effect of systemic, spinal or local activation of a-Adrenoreceptors under the inflammatory process on
the rheumatoid arthritis model induced by Zymosan. Alves HR1, Lucena TO1, Ferreira RT1, Silva RF1, Bassi GS2,
Vanderlinde FA1, Kanashiro A2, Malvar DC1 1UFRRJ – Ciências Fisiológicas, 2FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
04.036 Emerging treatment for Psoriasis: Role for hydrogen sulphide donor, GYY4137. Rodrigues L1, Schmidt
TP1, Cerqueira ARA1, Florenzano J1, Santos KT1, Teixeira SA1, Wood ME2, Whiteman M2, Muscará MN1, Costa
SKP1 1ICB-USP – Farmacologia, 2University of Exeter-St. Luke's
04.038 Friedelin and Friedelin complexed in cyclodextrin reduces airway allergic inflammation in a murine
model of asthma. Ferro JNS1, Serra MF2, Santos SL1, Cotias AC2, Lima FF2, Aquino FLT1, Silva JPN1, Alves PR1,
Broetto L1, Ferreira FR3, Abreu FC3, Conserva LM3, Martins MA2, Barreto E1 1ICBS-UFAL, 2Fiocruz, 3UFAL –
Química e Biotecnologia
04.040 Antinociceptive, antiedematogenic and anti-inflammatory effects of Borreria verticillata and its
compounds. Teixeira FM1, Ferreira RT1, Guimarães LD2, Silva RF1, Malvar DC1, Chaves DAS2, Vanderlinde FA1
1
UFRRJ – Ciências Fisiológicas, 2UFRRJ – Química
04.042 Reduced lung inflammation in intrauterine undernourished rats is not related to high circulating levels
of corticosterone. Gil NL1,2, Azevedo G2, Silva MM2, Fernandes L2, Landgraf MA3,2, Landgraf RG2 – 1ICB-USP –
Imunologia, 2Unifesp-Diadema – Inflamação e Farmacologia Vascular, 3ICB-USP – Farmacologia
04.044 Heparan sulfate (HS) inhibits the synthesis of melatonin in rat pineal glands via toll-like 4 receptors
(TLR4) activation. Acco M1, Cecon E2,1, Nader HB3, Markus RP1 1USP – Fisiologia, 2Institut Cochin, 3Unifesp –
Bioquímica
04.046 Investigation of a nanodispersion system and its impact on skin delivery of the hydrogen sulfide donor
(GYY4137) in an experimental model of psoriasis. Schmidt TP1, Rodrigues L1, Cerqueira ARA1, Carvalho VFM1,
Teixeira SA1, Wood M2, Whiteman M2, Muscará MN1, Lopes LB1, Costa SKP1 1ICB-USP – Farmacologia,
2
University of Exeter-St. Luke's
04.048 Antimicrobial activity and biochemical and structural analyses of Dermcidin-1L (DCD-1L) and its splice
variant (DCD-SV) in biomimetic membranes. Bronze F1, Riske K2, Brandão V2, Belizario J1 1ICB-USP –
Farmacologia, 2Unifesp – Biofísica
04.050 Down-regulation of single immunoglobulin Interleukin-1R-related molecule (SIGIRR) gene expression
during irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis. Wanderley CWS, Silva CMS, Fernandes C, Muniz HA, Aguiar MG,
Lima GS, Wong DVT, Lima-Junior RCP1, Ribeiro RA1 1UFC – Farmacologia e Fisiologia
04.052 Effect of myrtenol on neutrophil migration and adhesion in inflammatory conditions. Gomes BS1,
Sousa-Neto BP1, Silva FV1, Sousa DP2, Wanderley CWS3, Wong DVT3, Ribeiro RA3, Lima-Júnior RCP3, Oliveira
RCM1, Oliveira FA1 1UFPI – Medicinal Plants, 2UFS – Pharmacy, 3UFC – Physiology and Pharmacology
04.054 Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity of the hidroethanolic extract of Macrosiphonia longiflora
(Desf.) Mull. Arg. in chronic pulmonar allergic inflammation experimental model. Cruz TCD, Almeida DAT,
Martins DTO Farmacologia e Toxicologia de Produtos Naturais
04.056 Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha on platelet reactivity of rats injected with lipopolysaccharide.
Bueno PI, Abreu E, Naime ACA, Bonfitto PHL, Goulart G, Marcondes S FCM-Unicamp – Farmacologia, 2Unicamp
– Farmacologia
04.058 Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide increases the expression and activity of metalloproteinase9 in gingival fibroblasts culture from normal and diabetic mice. Beltran CT, Tirado IS, Brito VGB, Queiroz DPS,
Oliveira SHP Unesp-Araçatuba
04.060 Physicochemical characterization of 15d-Prostaglandin J2-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles and effects
on inflammation. de Melo NFS1, Macedo CG2, Abdalla HB2, Bonfante R2, Fraceto LF3, Clemente-Napimoga JT2,
Napimoga MH1 1São Leopoldo Mandic – Imunologia e Biologia Molecular, 2FOP-Unicamp – Fisiologia, 3Unesp –
Engenharia Ambiental
04.062 Role of intestinal microflora and bacterial translocation in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis induced
by irinotecan in mice. Aragão KS1, Almeida PRC2, Melo AT1, Muniz HA3, Lopes CDH3, Neto PRP3, Carvalho
CBM4, Lima-Júnior RCP1, Ribeiro RA1 1UFC – Fisiologia e Farmacologia, 2UFC – Patologia e Medicina Legal,
3
Hospital Haroldo Juaçaba/ICC, 4UFC – Medical Microbiology
05. Pain and Nociception Pharmacology
05.002 Pre-clinical evidence on the benefits of docosahexanoic acid on adverse and anti-tumoral effects of
cyclophosphamide. Freitas RDS1,2, Costa KM2,1, Nicoletti NF2,1, Campos MM3,2,1 1PUCRS – Toxicologia e
Farmacologia, 2PUCRS – Medicina e Ciências da Saúde, 3PUCRS – Odontologia
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
43
05.004 Effects of simvastatin on diabetic neuropathic pain in rats. Corso CR, Werner MFP UFPR –
Farmacologia
05.006 Involvement of microglial cells in chemical or sustained isometric contraction-induced muscle
hyperalgesia. Melo B, Pelizari M, Oliveira-Fusaro MCG FCA-Unicamp – Saúde
05.008 Involvement of NO/cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive K+ channels pathway on local antinociceptive effect of
dipyrone and its metabolite 4-MAA. Assis DCR1, Vaz ALL2, Melo MCC3, Rae GA4, Clososki GC2, Souza GEP3
1
FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 2FCFRP-USP – Produtos Naturais e Sintéticos, 3FCFRP-USP – Física e Química ,
4
UFSC – Farmacologia
05.010 Mechanical muscle hyperalgesia induced by sustained isometric contraction is mediated by P2X3,
AMPA E NMDA receptors. Jorge CO, Marques ACS, Melo B, Santos DFS, Azambuja G, Oliveira-Fusaro MCG
FCA-UNICAMP – Saúde
05.012 Muscle pain induced by chemical stimulus or sustained isometric contraction is modulated by PPAR-y
receptors in Wistar rats. Santos DFS, Oliveira-Fusaro MCG Unicamp
05.014 Pharmacological characterization of fish oil concentrate treatment on experimental
neuropathic pain. Silva RV, Lima CKF, Lobo BW, Miranda ALP UFRJ – Medicamentos
model of
05.016 Gedunin induces anti-nociceptive effect in Swiss mice. Chaves AS, Brito TM, Rodrigues SA, Amendoeira
FC, Ferraris FK Fiocruz – Farmacologia e Toxicologia
05.018 Antihyperalgesic synergistic effect of diclofenac associated with terpinolene in inflammatory pain in
rats Macedo EMA1, Santos WC1, Piauilino CA1, Reis Filho AC1, Sousa DP2, Oliveira FA1, Almeida FRC1 1NPPMUFPI, 2UFPB – Ciências Farmacêuticas
05.020 Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of GYY-4137, a slow-releasing hydrogen sulfide (H2S)
donor, on temporomandibular joint synovitis induced by carrageenan in rats. de Lira FBC1, de Paula MAV1,
Teixeira SA1, Wood M2, Whiteman M2, Costa SKP1, Muscará MN1 1USP – Farmacologia, 2University of Exeter
Medical School
05.022 Antinociceptive activity of bergenin in a mice model of neuropathic diabetic pain. Santos DS1, Gama
KB2, Nascimento OA1, Alves CQ3, David JPL4, David JM4, Soares MBP2, Villarreal CF1 1UFBA – Farmacologia e
Terapêutica Experimental, 2CPqGM-Fiocruz-BA, 3UFBA – Química, 4UFBA
05.024 Study of the analgesic activity of Solidago chilensis Meyen extract enriched with diterpenes. Brito TM,
Chaves AS, Rodrigues SA, Amendoeira FC, Ferraris FK Fiocruz – Farmacologia e Toxicologia
05.026 Effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donors on pruritus induced by a type-2 protease activated receptor
(PAR-2) agonist in mice. Coavoy-Sánchez SA, Rodrigues L, Costa SKP, Muscará MN ICB-USP – Pharmacology
05.028 Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Properties of the Ethanol Extract of Trema micrantha
(Cannabaceae) leaves. Carvalho MGB1, Silva RV1, Carbonezi LH2, LIma CKF1, Miranda ALP1 – 1FF-LEFEx-UFRJ –
Biotecnologia Farmacêutica, 2IPPN-UFRJ –
05.030 α-Phellandrene presents anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperalgesic effects: Role of the antioxidant
mechanism, inhibition of the neutrophils migration and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Santos WC1,
Macedo EMA1, Cunha FVM1, Sousa DP2, Santos IMSP3, Araújo KS3, Oliveira FA1, Almeida FRC1 1UFPI –
Farmacologia, 2UFPB – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 3Facid
05.032 Microneedles enhance antinociceptive effect of topical 15d-PGJ2 cream in a rat model of
temporomandibular joint pain. Macedo CG1, Jain AK2, Franz-Montan M1, Napimoga MH3, Clemente-Napimoga
JT1, Gill HS2 1FOP-UNICAMP, 2Texas Tech University – Chemical Engineering, 3SLMandic
05.034 Antinociceptive effect of 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 is mediated by the activation of proliferatoractivated receptor- g on macrophage cells in the temporomandibular joint. Abdalla HB1, Macedo CG1,
Napimoga MH2, Bonfante R1, da Rocha LM1, Clemente-Napimoga JT1 1FOP-UNICAMP, 2SLMandic
05.036 Evaluation of the involvement of microglial cells in the induction and persistence of inflammatory
hyperalgesia induced rheumatoid arthritis in rats ATM. Bonfante R1, Abdalla HB1, da Rocha LM1, Macedo CG1,
Clemente-Napimoga JT1 1FOP-Unicamp – Ciências Fisiológicas
06. Cardiovascular and Renal Pharmacology
06.002 Unraveling the enigma of the positive inotropic effect of ATP on the heart of SHR. Rodrigues JQD1,
Camara H1, Silva-Junior E D1, Godinho RO1, Jurkiewicz A1 1Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia
06.004 Activation of a novel estrogen receptor by the agonist G1 ameliorates monocrotaline-induced
pulmonary hypertension in male rats. Alencar AKN1, Montes GC1, Martinez ST2, Pinto AC2, Groban L3, Sudo
RT1, Zapata-Sudo G1 1ICB-UFRJ – Desenvolvimento de Fármacos, 2UFRJ – Química, 3Wake Forest University –
Anesthesiology – 1ICB-UFRJ – Fármacos, 2UFRJ – Química, 3Wake Forest University – Anesthesiology
06.006 A new look into hypertension: A1 adenosine receptor function is potentiated in the right atrium of
spontaneous hypertensive rats. Câmara H, Rodrigues JQD, Silva-Junior ED, Godinho RO, Jurkiewicz A UnifespEPM – Farmacologia
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
06.008 Nlrp3 inflamassome activation is involved in type 1 Diabetes-associated vascular dysfunction. Pereira
CA1, Ferreira NS1, Zanotto CZ1, Carlos D2, Tostes RC1 1USP – Farmacologia, 2USP – Imunologia
06.010 Investigation of the mechanisms involved in mesoionic compound (MI-01)-induced vasorelaxant
response in rat superior mesenteric artery. Machado NT, Maciel PMP, Alustau-Fernandes MC, Silva TAF, Melo
MP, Cavalcante HC, Assis KS, Fernandes LF, Araújo IGA, Medeiros IA UFPB – Ciências da Saúde
06.012 Effects of the nytrosil complex[ cis-Ru(2,2’bipyridine)2(thiourea)(NO)] in rat isolated aorta Cabral PHB1,
Sampaio TB1, Junior FSG2, Santos CF1, Fonteles MC1, Lopes LGF2, Nascimento NRF1 1UECE – Fisiofarmacologia
Cardiorenal, 2UFC – Química Bioinorgânica
06.014 Oxidative stress impairs the vasorelaxant effects of sodium nitrite mediated by xanthine oxidoreductase
in renovascular hypertension. Blanco ALF1,2, Oliveira-Paula GH1, Pinheiro LC1, Guimaraes DA1, Tella SOC1,
Angelis CD3, Tanus-Santos JE1 1FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 2FFCLRP-USP – Biologia, 3Unicamp – Farmacologia
06.016 Vascular reactivity in rats with different plasmatic Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) activity
phenotypes. Pisano Dias ASES1, da Silva RM1, Souccar C1, Lapa AJ1,2,3, Lima-Landman MTR1 1Unifesp-EPM –
Farmacologia, 2CBA, 3UEA
06.018 S-nitrosothiols formation mediates the antihypertensive effects of oral sodium nitrite. Pinheiro LC1,
Amaral JH1, Ferreira GC1, Portella RL1, Toledo Jr JC2, Tanus-Santos JE1 1FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 2FFCLRPUSP – Química
06.020 Treatment with sodium nitrite attenuates the pressor responses to Angiotensin I and Angiotensin II, but
not to Bradykinin. Ferreira GC, Pinheiro LC, Vilalva KH, Portella RL, Tanus-Santos JE FMRP-USP – Farmacologia
06.022 Early exposure to air pollutant 1,2-Naphtoquinone and the impact on the control of vascular tonus
during puberty. Soares AG1, Amaral ES1, Florenzano J1, Teixeira SA1, Brain S2, Muscará MN1, Costa SK1 1ICBUSP – Farmacologia, 2King's College London
06.024 Beneficial effects of Cissampelos sympodialis Eichl. oral treatment on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary
hypertension in rats. Maciel PMP, Gusmão AB, Machado NT, Assis KS, Torres RA, Silva TAF, Santos PF,
Cavalcante HC, Alustau-Fernandes MC, Ribeiro TP, Medeiros IA CCS-UFPB
06.026 Contractile response induced by U46619 and relaxation induced by NCX2121 are similar in coronary
arteries isolated from renal hypertensive 2K-1C and normotensive 2K rats. Paula TD, Bendhack LM FCFRP-USP
– Física e Química
06.028 Effects of continuous and accumulated exercise on endothelial function in rat aorta. Martinez JE, Ledo
PBO, Chies AB FAMEMA
06.030 Exercise training improves the plasma antioxidant defenses in 2 kidneys, one clip (2K1C) hypertensive
rats. Oliveira PR, Ledo PBO, Chies AB FAMEMA
06.032 Apocynin and Diapocynin reduced the adrenergic vasoconstriction in intact aortas of Wistar rats,
however only apocynin reduced the concentration of reactive oxygen species in aortic endothelial cells.
Graton ME, Potje SR, Troiano JA, Silva DS, Pereira AAF, Nakamune AC, Ximenes VF, Antoniali C 1FOA-Unesp –
Ciências Básicas, 2FCB-Unesp – Química
06.034 Increased levels of matrix Metalloproteinase-2 seem crucial to the transition from cardiac hypertrophy
to heart failure in rats with abdominal aorta stenosis. Pereira SC1, dos Santos DO2, Prado FP2, Sanchez ER1,
Prado CM2, Castro MM1 1FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 2FMRP-USP – Patologia
07. Endocrine, Reproductive and Urogenital Pharmacology
07.002 Effects of testosterone replacement at physiological levels in the lower urinary tract of ovariectomized
(OVX) rat. Becerra SB, Oliveira MG, Moscoso JR, Calmasini FB, Campos RM, Iwamoto RD, Antunes E FCMUnicamp – Pharmacology
07.004 Characterization of increased prostate smooth muscle reactivity in middle-aged rats: Lack of effect of
testosterone replacement. Calmasini FB, Silva FH, Alexandre EC, Rodrigues RL, Báu FR, Barbosa APL, Anhê GF,
Antunes E FCM-Unicamp – Farmacologia
07.006 Effects of creatine supplementation in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin. Medeiros MA1, Lemos
LIC1, Silva FS1, Abreu BA1, Sobral MV2, Santos LRSO1, Medeiros KCP1 1UFRN, 2UFPB
08. Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Pharmacology
08.002 Quercetin targets senescent lung fibroblasts from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. Hohmann MS1,
Habiel DM2, Coelho AL2, Verri Jr WA1, Hogaboam CM2 1UEL – Ciências Patólogicas, 2Cedars Sinai Medical
Center – Pulmonary Medicine
08.004 Gabapetin inhibits the production of free-radicals in colitis induced by Trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid
(TNBS) in mices. Lima Filho ACM, Almendra RB, Batista JA, Silva IS, Carvalho NS, Junior JGD, Silva RO,
Filgueiras MC, Barbosa ALR UFPI – Farmacologia
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
45
08.006 Extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway and carbachol synergistically increase airway smooth muscle
contraction. Pacini ESA, Godinho RO Unifesp-EPM – Farmacologia
08.008 Gastric healing properties of a medicinal plant in threat of extinction: Persea willdenovii Kosterm.
Somensi LB, da Silva LM, Boeing T, Cury BJ, Andrade FS Univali – Ciências Farmacêuticas
08.010 JME-209 II: An orally active mexiletine analogue exhibiting anti-inflammatory actions in experimental
models of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Oliveira MTP1,
Coutinho DS1, Carvalho KIM1, Bernardi A1, Xavier RF2, Silva ET3, Silva PMR1, Costa JCS4, Martins MA1 1Fiocruz –
Inflammation, 2Fiocruz – Cellular Communication, 3Fiocruz – Organic Synthesis
08.012 Sulphated polysaccharides extracted from Gracilaria birdiae reduces parameters inflammatory of the
mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in mice. Almendra RB, Teles RHG, Costa MS, Magalhães DA, Lima
Filho ACM, Batista JA, Coelho ML, Lima GM, Carvalho NS, Silva IS, Macêdo WBS, Barbosa ALR, Filgueiras MC
UFPI – Farmacologia
08.014 Gastroprotective potential of the Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. (jackfruit) seeds in Mice. da Rosa RL,
Almeida CLB, da Silva LM, Cechinel-Filho V, Andrade SF Univali – Pharmaceutical Sciences
08.016 Hydrogen sulfide reduces inflammation in acute pancreatitis induced by common bile duct obstruction
in mice. Santos-Oliveira A1, Santana DG1, Muscara MN2, Costa SKP2, Camargo EA1 1UFS – Physiology, 2USP –
Pharmacology
08.018 Evaluation of gastroprotective activity and mechanism of action of allantoin in different experimental
ulcer models. Silva DM1, Martins JLR2, Oliveira DR1, Oliveira TS1, Ghedini PC1, Costa EA3 1UFG, 2Centro
Universitário Unievangélica, 3UFG – Farmacologia
09. Natural Products and Toxinology
09.002 The role of oxidative stress in indigo alkaloid protection against TNBS-induced colitis in rats. de
Almeida ACA1, de Faria FM1, Manzo LPB1, Dunder RJ1, Socca EAR1, Luiz-Ferreira A2, Souza Brito ARM1 1IBUnicamp, 2UFG – Ciências Biológicas
09.004 Effect of 2-Phenylquinoline in experimentally induced gastric ulcers: Pathways of gastroprotection.
Breviglieri E1, da Silva LM1, Boeing T1, Somensi LB1, Gimenez A2, Cechinel-Filho V1, Andrade SF1 – 1Univali –
Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Universidad Mayor de San Andrés
09.006 Evidences about gastric healing activity of Maytenus robusta Reissek: in vitro and in vivo studies.
Costa P, da Silva LM, Boeing T, Somensi LB, Cury BJ, Steimbach VMB, Santin JR, Cechinel-Filho V, Andrade
SF Univali – Pharmaceutical Sciences
09.008 Scorpion Tityus apiacas: identification of venom components with antimicrobial activity. Dal Mas C1,
Carvalho MA2, da Silva Junior PI3, Hayashi MAF1 1Unifesp – Farmacologia Celular, 2UFMT – Biologia e Zoologia,
3
IBu – Toxicologia Aplicada
09.010 Yerba mate extract increases bone markers expression on in vitro osteogenic differentiation of bone
marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from Wistar rats. Brito VGB, Chaves-Neto AH, Landim-Barros T,
Oliveira SHP FOA-Unesp – Ciências Básicas
09.012 Reproductive characteristics of male Wistar rats supplemented with extract and fractions of fruits of
Tribulus terrestris L. Oliveira NNPM1, Félix MAR2, Pereira TCS2, Rocha LGP2, Miranda JR2, Zangeronimo MG2,
Pinto JEBP1, Bertolucci SKV1, Sousa RV2 – 1UFLA – Plantas Medicinais, 2UFLA – Medicina Veterinária
09.016 Antimicrobial activity of (+)- Dehydrofukinone isolated from Nectandra grandiflora essential oil. Garlet
QI1, Pires LC2, Spall S2, Gressler LT3,4, Bandeira Jr G4, Vargas APC4, Heinzmann BM1 – 1UFSM – Fisiologia e
Farmacologia, 2UFSM – Farmácia Industrial, 3UFSM, 4UFSM – Medicina Veterinária
09.018 Role of species reactive oxygen mitochondrial and intracytoplasmic in the anti-inflammatory effects of
hydroethanolic extract of Dilodendron bipinnatum Radlk. Oliveira RG1, Miyajima F2, Castilho GRC1, Luz TE1,
Batista MS1, Martins DTO1 1UFMT – Ciências Básicas em Saúde, 2University of Liverpool – Molecular and
Clinical Pharmacology
09.020 Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of a standardized aqueous extract and butanolic fraction of C.
glaziovii Sneth in acute DSS-induced colitis in mice. Nogueira FM1, Tanae MM1, Landman G2, Lima-Landman
MTR1, Lapa AJ1,3, Souccar C1 1Unifesp-EPM – Pharmacology, 2Unifesp-EPM – Pathology, 3Amazon Biotechnology
Center – Pharmacology and Toxicology
09.024 Hepatoprotective effect of Cymbopogon citratus essential oil against acetaminophen-induced liver
toxicity in mice. Uchida NS, Rafael PA, Silva-Filho SE, Rodrigues PJ, Cardia GFE, Wiirzler LAM, Bersani-Amado
CA, Cuman RKN UEM – Farmacologia e Terapêutica
09.026 Topical anti-inflammatory effect of lavender essential oil. Cardia GFE, Aguiar RP, Rocha BR, Wiirzler
LAM, Silva-Fillho SE, Uchida NS, Rodrigues PJ, Bersani-Amado CA, Cuman RKN UEM – Farmacologia e
Terapêutica
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
09.028 Evaluation of topical anti-inflammatory activity of cinnamic acid in experimental model. Rodrigues PJ,
Aguiar RP, Rocha BA, Silva-Filho SE, Cardia GFE, Wiirzler LAM, Uchida NS, Bersani-Amado CA, Cuman RKN
UEM – Farmacologia e Terapêutica
09.030 Doxycycline attenuates the hypotension caused by Bothrops alternatus (Urutu) snake venom: a role for
venom metalloproteinases. Inoue BR, Dias L, Rodrigues MAP, da Silva IRF, Panunto PC, Hyslop S Unicamp –
Farmacologia
09.031 Evaluation in vivo of the antioxidant activity of red wine and its residue from Vale do São Francisco
in normotensive rats treated during 30 days by gavage. Marques VFP1, Santos IM2, Oliveria WP3, Biasoto ACT4,
Lima KM2, Negro-Dellacqua M2 1Univasf – Acadêmico, 2Univasf, 3UFBA, 4Embrapa
09.032 Effects of polyanions on some activities of Bothrops leucurus venom. Cons BL1, Tomaz MA1, Strauch
MA2, Monteiro-Machado M1, Tavares-Henriques MS1, Cruz JMT1, Saturnino-Oliveira J3, Melo PA1 1UFRJ –
Farmacologia e Química Medicinal, 2Instituto Vital Brasil – Diretoria Científica, 3UFS – Departamento de
Morfologia
09.034 Inhibition of rat renal neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP 24.11) activity by Bothrops snake venoms .
Fernandes PCL, Torres-Huaco FD Unicamp – Farmacologia
09.036 Adenosine receptor antagonism and 5´-Nucleotidase inhibition protect against lethal hypotension
caused by Bothrops alternatus (Urutu) snake venom. Pereira-Marcelino E, Tamascia ML, Hyslop S FCMUnicamp – Bioquímica e Farmacologia
09.038 Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme activity by Bothrops spp. and Lachesis muta muta snake
venoms. Brunieri LVP, Dias L, Rodrigues MAP, Lorenzetti R, Hyslop S Unicamp – Farmacologia
09.040 Effects of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom on bronchial epithelial cells. Rigoni VLS1,2, Vieira RP3, Silva
JLV4, Nogueira-Pedro A5,6, Kwasniewski FH7, Zamuner SR1 1Uninove – Medicina, 2Unifesp-EPM – Biofísica,
3
Uninove – Ciências da Reabilitação, 4Uninove – Farmácia, 5Unifesp-EPM – Bioquímica, 6FCF-USP – Análises
Clínicas e Toxicológicas, 7UEL – Ciências Patológicas
09.042 Antiulcer effect of Solanum stipulaceaum Will ex. Roem & Shult. Oliveira DF1, Lima CAA2, Estevam CA2,
Batista JS2 – 1UFS – Enfermagem, 2UFS – Fisiologia
09.044 In vitro effects of brasiliensic and isobrasiliensic acids from Calophyllum brasiliense Camb. on gastric
cell turnover. Lemos LM1, Pritchard DM2, Burkitt MD2, Martins DTO1 1UFMT – Farmacologia, 2University of
Liverpool – Gastroenterology
09.046 Effect of heparin in cutaneous lesions induced by Bothrops jararacussu snake venom. Borges PA1,
Teixeira RGS2, Nogueira TA2, Oliveira FL3, Calil-Elias S2, Melo PA1 1UFRJ – Farmacologia e Química Medicinal,
2
UFF, 3UFRJ
09.048 Hemodynamic responses to Bothrops fonsecai snake venom: Lack of neutralization by commercial
Bothropic antivenom. Tamascia ML1, Collaço RCO1, Cogo JC2, Rodrigues-Simioni L1, Hyslop S1 1FCM-Unicamp –
Farmacologia, 2UNIVAP – Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP&D) / Serpentário do Centro de Estudos da Natureza
(CEN)
09.050 Anti-inflammatory and anti-ulcer activities of Achyrocline alata (Kunch). Silva GGO1, Arfux CRB1,
Menegatti CF1, Duarte LC1, Souza TB2, Moreno SE1 – 1Universidade Católica Dom Bosco – Biotecnologia,
2
Universidade Católica Dom Bosco – Acadêmico
09.052 Inhibition of snake venom phospholipasic activity by using distinct neuromuscular junction protocols.
Schezaro-Ramos R1, Randazzo-Moura P2, Cogo JC3, Rodrigues-Simioni L1 1FCM-Unicamp – Farmacologia,
2
PUCSP – Ciências Médicas, 3UNIVAP – Estudos da Natureza
09.054 Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of Struthanthus marginatus (Desr.) Blume. Silva RV1, Arruda MO2,
Carmo MS2, Freire SMF1, Monteiro Neto V2 1UFMA – Farmacologia, 2Ceuma – Biologia Parasitária
09.056 Cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of C. oblongifolia Mart. ex Hayne and C. duckei Dwyer oleoresin
and leaf extract on human gastric carcinoma cells. Lemos M1, Silva JJM1, Rogez HLG2, Veneziani RCS3,
Ambrósio SR3, Banderó Filho VC4, Sasse A4, Sheridan H4, Bastos JK1 – 1FCFRP-USP – Ciências Farmacêuticas,
2
CVACBA-UFPA – Engenharia de Alimentos, 3Unifran – Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, 4TBSI-Trinity College
Dublin – Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
09.058 The anti-ulcer and anti-proliferative activities of the hexane extract and candidate isolates brasiliensic
and isobrasiliensic acids of Calophyllum brasiliense: A mechanistic evaluation of their properties. Castilho
GRC1, Lemos LMS1, Oliveira RG1, Miyajima F2, Martins DTO1 1UFMT – Ciências Básicas em Saúde, 2University of
Liverpool – Pharmacology
09.060 Antispasmodic effect of dichloromethane phase from ethanol extract of Serjania caracasana (Jacq.)
Willd. (Sapindaceae) on ileum rat. Gonçalves ACB1, Marcolin LSA2, Silva VA3, Rigoni VLS4,3, Silva FL5, BarbosaFilho JM6, Nouailhetas VLA4, Silva JLV7 1Uninove – Farmácia, 2Uninove – Ciências Médicas, 3Uninove –
Mestrado Medicina, 4Unifesp – Biofísica, 5USP – Química, 6UFPB – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 7Uninove – Ciências
da Saúde
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
47
09.062 Chemoprotective effect of apple juice in liver and blood of rats exposed to cadmium. Moura CFG1,
Ribeiro FAP2, Gollucke APB2, Oshima CTF1, Ribeiro DA2,1 1Unifesp – Patologia, 2Unifesp-Baixada Santista –
Biociências
10. Cancer Pharmacology
10.002 In vivo anti-tumoral effects of simvastatin and pravastatin in a cancer stem cell-rich model of breast
carcinoma. Rennó AL, Alves-Junior M, Souza PC, Souza VB, Latuf-Filho P, Cardelli NJA, Schenka NGM, Schenka
AA FCM-Unicamp – Farmacologia
10.004 Effect of simvastatin on MUC1 expression in breast cancer xenografts. Cardelli NJA1, Souza VB1, Souza
CP1, Rennó AL1, Mendonça GRA1, Anjos D1, Franchi Jr GC2, Latuf-Filho P2, Nascimento FC2, Resende M2, Rocha
MR2, Soares F2, Vassalo J3, Schenka AA1 – 1FCM-Unicamp – Farmacologia, 2FCM-Unicamp, 3FCM-Unicamp –
Patologia
10.006 Assessment of in vitro effects of the quinoxaline-derived chalcone N9 in breast cancer cells. Erig TC1,
Mielcke TR2,3, Mascarello A4, Chiaradia LD4, Nunes RJ4, Campos MM2,3,5 1PUCRS – Pharmacy, 2PUCRS –
Toxicology and Pharmacology, 3PUCRS – Medicine and Health Sciences, 4UFSC – Chemistry, 5PUCRS – Dentistry
11. Pharmacokinetics and Toxicology
11.002 Determination of free tissue brain concentration of voriconazole by microdialysis in healthy and
cryptococcus neoformans infected Wistar rats. Alves IA1, Lock G2, Rist J2, Rates S1, Araújo BV1 1UFRGS –
Ciências Farmacêuticas, 2UFRGS – Farmácia
11.004 Determination of thimerosal content in Influenza A (H1N1) multi-dose vaccine and evaluation of in
vitro toxicity. Rodrigues S1, Ferraris FK1, Leandro KC2 1INCQS-Fiocruz – Farmacologia e Toxicologia, 2INCQSFiocruz – Química Analítica
11.006 Accessing metformin free levels in healthy and diabetics rat tissues using microdialysis technique.
Braga A1, Izolan JS1, Lock GA2, Dalla Costa T1,2, Araújo BV1,2 1UFRGS – Ciências Farmacêuticas, 2UFRGS –
Faculdade de Farmácia
11.008 Histopathological evaluation of the profile of non-human primate species of Cebus apella treated with
LDE-paclitaxel oleate as a tool for cancer therapeutics. Oliveira NCL1, Feio DCA1, Silva WB2, Muniz JAPC2,
Burbano RR1, Maranhão RC3, Lima PDL4 1UFPA, 2CENP, 3Metabolismo de Lípides, 4UEPA
11.010 Safety evaluation of Rubus rosaefolius extract: In vivo, in vitro and in silico toxicological studies.
Broering MF, Tonin TD, Petreanu M, Niero R, Machado ID, Santin JR Univali – Farmácia
11.012 Local toxicity of dapaconazole, a new antifungal drug, after chronic intravaginal appplication. Campos
RM, Rojas-Muscoso JA, Pissinati L, Iwamoto RD, de Nucci G Unicamp – Farmacologia
11.014 Liquid chromatography/UV method for determination of cefazolin subcutaneous penetration in rats by
microdialysis. Lima DMF1, Laureano JV2, Palma EC2, Araújo BV2, Dalla Costa T2 1UFRGS – Farmácia, 2UFRGS –
Pharmaceutical Sciences
12. Pharmacogenomics, Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Pharmacology
12.002 Protein kinase C genotypes and haplotype modify the antihypertensive responses to enalapril. OliveiraPaula GH1, Lacchini R1, Fontana V1, Silva PS2, Biagi C3, Tanus-Santos JE1 1FMRP-USP – Farmacologia, 2FCMUnicamp – Farmacologia, 3Santa Casa de Araçatuba
13. Drug Discovery and Development
13.002 Protective effects of green tea against Leukemic Immune Suppression. Calgarotto AK1, Pericole FV1,
Maso V1, Longhini AL1, Favaro P2, Santo IP1, Duarte ASS1, Saad ATO1 1FCM-Unicamp, 2Unifesp-Diadema
13.004 Layered double hydroxides intercalated with Norfloxacin: characterization X-ray diffractometry
and hemolysis assay. França CM1, Lima AB1, Costa KM1, Dias DRC1, Remedios CRM2, Anicete-Santos M2, Alves
CN2 – 1UFPA – Biotecnologia, 2UFPA
13.006 Gastro-protective and anti-edematogenic effects of ibuprofen intercalated in layered double hydroxide
carrier. Bentes Lima A1, Queiroz Santos GC2, França CM1, Anicete-Santos M1, Nascimento JLM3, Bastos GNT3 –
1
UFPA – Biotecnologia, 2UFPA – Biologia Celular e Molecular, 3UFPA – Ciências Biológicas
13.008 Effect of chronic treatment with creatine nanoliposomes on hepatic and hematologic toxicity
parameters in rats. Moreira MP1, Borin DB1, Mezzomo NJ1, Biacchi K2, Amaral RG2, Rech VC1, Boeck CR1 –
1
Unifra – Nanociências, 2Unifra – Acadêmico
13.010 Healing activity and anti-inflammatory action of the extracts from PE1, PE2, PE3 of the Amazon flora.
Bastos AC, Santos GCQ, Gomes MF, da Silva JKR, Maia JGS, do Nascimento JLM, Bastos GNT UFPA
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
13.012 Antibacterial activity and mechanism of hydroethanolic extract of Gallesia integrifolia (Spreng.) Harms
inner stem bark. Karuppusamy A1, Silva LI, Balogun SO, Martin DTO2 1UFMT – Ciências da Saúde, 2UFMT –
Ciências Básicas em Saúde
13.014 Molecular dynamics study of Plasmepsin II inhibitors. Carlos E, Braz C, Guimarães E UFRN
15. Pharmacology: Others
15.002 Creatine-loaded liposomes on oxidative stress parameters in model hyperphenylalaninemia. Borin DB1,
Mezzomo NJ1, Dotto B2, Amaral RG2, Dias JB2, Rech VC1, Boeck CR1 – 1Unifran – Nanociências, 2Unifran –
Biomedicina
15.004 Effect of swimming training on neurogenic contraction and stock of intracellular calcium concentration
in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Pena-Garcia M1, Miranda-Ferreira R1, Castro Musial D1, Jurkiewicz A1, Da
Silva R2, Cezaretti M2 1Unifesp – Farmacologia, 2Unifesp
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
49
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
50
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Lecture abstracts
Courses:
Biotérios e Manejo de Animais. Luisa Macedo Braga- PUCRS
A ciência de animais de laboratório é uma área relativamente jovem dentro do que podemos chamar de
ciência estruturada. Ela possui um conteúdo ético considerável. O uso de animais em experimentação exige
que tenhamos um forte comprometimento. Precisamos colocar numa balança de um lado a real validade
científica do projeto que iremos executar e por outro o compromisso em não causar dor ou sofrimento nos
animais utilizados. A maioria dos animais utilizados em pesquisa experimentais em nosso país e no mundo
são os roedores, das espécies ratos e camundongos. O ambiente onde estes animais são mantidos, a
condição sanitária proporcionada e a genética, influenciam a resposta biológica fornecida pelos roedores.
Controlando essas variáveis e investindo na a educação dos profissionais que executam atividades junto a
eles, os animais iram atingir um estado ideal de bem-estar e os pesquisadores irão obter resultados
confiáveis e reprodutíveis. Os animais devem ser criados ou mantidos em Biotérios, definidos como o local
que possua controle das condições ambientais, nutricionais e sanitárias, podendo ser Biotérios de criação,
manutenção ou experimentação. Independente do tipo, esses locais devem estar adequados para a
manutenção do status sanitário e genético dos animais que ali alojados. Devem possuir condições
controladas, comparáveis e estáveis tanto no macro quanto no microambiente. O primeiro entendesse como
a sala onde os animais estão e onde devemos definir os parâmetros de iluminação, ruído, temperatura,
umidade relativa do ar e ventilação, que sejam capazes de manter a homeostase dos animais, evitando
gastos fisiológicos. Por microambiente, entende-se aquele contíguo ao animal, a caixa. O microambiente ideal
deve permitir que os animais
realizem normalmente as suas necessidades fisiológicas (micção, defecação e
manutenção da temperatura corporal), comportamentais (movimentação e ajustes de postura comuns a sua
espécie) , a interação social, que permaneçam limpos, secos e com ventilação adequada, que tenham fácil
acesso a água e alimentação e que possam ser observados com o mínimo de perturbação para eles. Para
isso, precisamos conhecer e controlar todos os fatores que nele interferem, como o tipo de caixa, a ração,
a cama, a água que bebem e o número de animais delas. Além do ambiente, o manejo a que os animais
são submetidos durante a contenção, pode ser responsável por 100% do estresse que ele sofre durante o
protocolo experimental. A forma correta de manuseio precisa ser observada.
Regressão não linear e análise de curva dose-efeito. (François Noël, UFRJ)
Nesta aula, iremos primeiramente relembrar as equações que descrevem as relações entre concentração (ou
dose) de fármaco e efeito. Em seguida, iremos apresentar os princípios da regressão não linear, técnica
estatística necessária para descrever quantitativamente estes fenômenos. Após esta introdução teórica, iremos
usar o programa PRISM, de amplo uso no nosso meio, para realizar alguns exercícios ilustrando as boas
práticas no uso deste recurso. Analisaremos dados experimentais mostrando alguns recursos deste programa
que permitem verificar a qualidade do ajuste (fitting) e a escolha entre diferentes equações/modelos, visando
obter os parâmetros que quantificam a potência (quer seja CE50 ou DE50 em estudos funcionais ou CI50 em
estudos de competição) ou afinidade (Kd, em estudos de saturação (binding)) assim como Emax (ou Imax) e
Bmax (binding). Para finalizar, mostraremos algumas formas consideradas adequadas para publicação em
revistas de farmacologia quando se quer apresentar de forma tabular os resultados caracterizando tais
curvas, com informação sobre precisão dos parâmetros obtidos após repetição de experimentos
independentes.
Introdução à Análise de Variância e ANOVA de uma via. Carlos Mello, UFSM
Nesta aula primeiramente relembraremos que a análise de variância é um teste estatístico baseado na
hipótese nula, apresentando o conceito de hipótese estatística e quais os erros possíveis em um teste de
hipóteses. Logo após, abordaremos, de forma intuitiva, como a análise de variância foi concebida pelo genial
Ronald A. Fisher (1925-1991) como alternativa para comparar mais que dois grupos experimentais. Após
entender a lógica intuitiva por trás da análise de variância, com ênfase no raciocínio sobre a variabilidade
dos dados, aprofundaremos os conceitos de variância propriamente dita, soma dos quadrados, graus de
liberdade, quadrado médio do modelo (medida de variabilidade entre grupos), quadrado médio do resíduo
(medida de variabilidade dentro dos grupos) e razão de quadrados médios, que é o valor calculado de F,
em si, probabilidade de alfa e probabilidade de beta, e poder de prova de um teste estatístico. Após serem
esclarecidos os pressupostos da ANOVA e os testes de homocedasticidade e normalidade, realizaremos uma
análise de variância “a mão”, utilizando uma planilha eletrônica para calcular não só o valor da razão de F,
mas também o valor de r, como medida do tamanho de efeito. Os cálculos serão conferidos pelo programa
PRISM. A ideia é desmistificar a ANOVA de uma via, revelando a “caixa preta” dos pacotes estatísticos. A
seguir, discutiremos sobre os testes post-hoc (complementares) mais comumente utilizados e sua indicação:
Tukey, Bonferroni e Dunnett. Por fim, encerraremos com um exemplo de como determinar a melhor função
matemática que explica a variação de escores em uma curva de dose e o quanto da variabilidade total dos
dados pode ser explicada pelas diferentes funções matemáticas possíveis (linear, quadrática, cúbica, etc.), a
chamada decomposição da soma dos quadrados em componentes (linear, quadrático, cúbico, etc.).
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
51
ANOVA de duas (ou mais) vias – como fazer e interpretar. Carlos Mello, UFSM
Nesta aula introduziremos a análise de variância de duas vias, exercitando como identificar desenhos
experimentais fatoriais. Uma vez definido o conceito de desenho fatorial (fatores e níveis), serão introduzidos
os conceitos de efeitos simples e de interação entre fatores, e a necessidade de se respeitar os
pressupostos da ANOVA (sob pena de perda de poder de prova). A seguir será aprofundado o conceito de
que uma interação significativa implica na existência de efeitos não-aditivos entre os fatores. Assim, um
desenho experimental simples em farmacologia do uso de um antagonista para verificar o mecanismo de
ação de um dado composto (modelo 2 x 2) será exaustivamente debatido, mostrando a necessidade
imperiosa de utilizar um desenho experimental completo, de forma a retirar conclusões coerentes a partir do
modelo. A mecânica de interpretação correta da saída da ANOVA fatorial será exaustivamente exercitada,
bem como a discussão da necessidade (ou da falta dela) de executar análises post-hoc em modelos
fatoriais. Na medida em que houver compreensão integral do modelo, tempo e interesse, este poderá ser
estendido à análise não-paramétrica fatorial.
Fisiologia e Biofísica do íon Ca2+ Viviane Louise Andree Nouailhetas (Unifesp-EPM)
Introdução: Muitos processos celulares são disparados a partir da elevação da concentração intracelular de
Ca2+ acima da concentração de repouso (100 nM). O objetivo desta aula é de apresentar os fundamentos
biofísicos para se entender a gênesis das correntes de cálcio responsáveis por esse aumento crítico da [Ca
2+
]cel. A aula compreenderá 4 seções: 1. Princípios eletrofisiológicos para o entendimento de fenômenos
elétricos em sistemas biológicos: distribuição do cálcio nas células, mecanismos de transporte de íons
através de membranas biológicas, princípios biofísicos da difusão, incluindo permeabilidade, potencial
eletroquímico e potencial de equilíbrio (equação de Nernst). Gênesis do potencial de repouso pelo modelo
difusional (equação de Goldman, Hodgkin e Katz) e pelo modelo elétrico (resistência/condutância e potencial
de reversão). Permeabilidade e corrente de cálcio nas células. 2. Caracterização de uma proteína de
membrana como um canal iônico, focalizando principalmente os canais Ca2+: condutância, seletividade,
mecanismo de “gating” (condutor e não condutor), probabilidade de abertura e fechamento, mecanismo de
cinética (estados fechado, aberto, inativado), bloqueadores e ativadores. 3. Tipos de canais de cálcio: canal
de Ca2+, dependentes de voltagem, canais de rianodina (“sparks” de cálcio), canais de Ca2+ ativados por
trisfosfato de inositol (IP3, “puffs” de cálcio), canais de Ca2+ operados por receptores, canais de Ca2+
operados por estoques. 4. Papel fisiológico das correntes de cálcio, focando principalmente as células
excitáveis: nervos, miócito esquelético, cardíaco e liso.
Técnicas óticas e não óticas para medição da concentração intracelular de cálcio. Edgar J.
Paredes-Gamero. Universidade de Mogi das Cruzes (UMC) / Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP)
Dentre dos sinalizadores celulares que controlam diversos processos encontra-se o íon Ca2+. Variações na
ordem nanomolar a micromolar, aspectos espaciais e temporais traduzidos por proteínas sensíveis às suas
variações controlam diversos processos celulares como contração, secreção, proliferação, diferenciação,
morte celular e aprendizado. Esta regulação do Ca2+ se dá por uma complexa e fina maquinaria celular que
compreende receptores de membrana, canais iônicos, bombas, entre outros. Para quantificar as variações do
Ca2+ no citoplasma e em organelas foram desenvolvidas metodologias diversas com métodos radioativos,
fluoróforos e uso de proteínas sensíveis as suas variações ou transfecção das mesmas. Dentre os principais
fluoróforos que se utilizam para quantificar o Ca2+ encontra-se o Fura-2 cujo tamanho e características
raciométricas permitem medidas de Ca2+ no citoplasma. E dentre as proteínas sensíveis às variações de Ca2+
encontra-se a proteína quimérica Cameleon a qual pode ser direcionada para o citoplasma e organelas.
Estes e outros métodos para a quantificação do Ca2+ que permitem uma descrição dos eventos da
sinalização serão abordados.
Papel do íon Ca 2+ na liberação de neurotransmissores e sua modulação pelo íon Mg 2+ Alexandre P.
Corrado (FMRP-USP)
Dentre os importantes papeis exercidos pelo íon Ca 2+ no organismo, a mediação da liberação de
neurotransmissores , afigura-se o mais abrangente, pois envolve todo o sistema nervoso, incluindo os
contingentes central e periférico. Isto ocorre, através do funcionamento adequado de sinapses químicas, as
quais medeiam a transdução de sinais biológicos entre neurônios ou entre neurônios e células efetuadoras,
as quais participam dos acoplamentos excitação-secreção e excitação-contração, eventos também mediados
pelo íon Ca2+, cujos efeitos são todos modulados pelo íon Mg 2+, que se revelou o seu antagonista
competitivo. Pretendemos realçar antagonismos desta natureza, cuja importância abrange todas as áreas
biológicas, devido à facilidade e versatilidade da sua aplicação, aspectos plenamente exemplificados no
antagonismo entre os íons Ca2+ e Mg2+ , cuja demonstração inicial requereu metodologia de natureza
eletrofisiológica que foi posteriormente complementada por metodologia de mais fácil montagem e rápida
execução e capaz de fornecer praticamente os mesmos resultados. Pretendemos apresentar um novo grupo
de drogas antagonistas competitivas do íon Ca 2+, os antibióticos Aminoglicosídeos-Aminociclitólicos, cujo
antagonismo com o íon Ca2+ocorre em todos os níveis de toxicidade desses compostos: aguda, subaguda e
crônica.
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Conferences
Research and Post-Graduation in Brazil: Past, Present and Future. Some Reflections about the
Development of Pharmacology in Brazil Jorge A. Guimarães (UFRGS)
1. On the value of Science: Several authors seek to illustrate with concrete data what it means and
represents to the lives of citizens the contribution of science and its respective social value. In a recent
article in Science William Press (Press, 2013) (1) shows very clearly what accounted for the American Society,
the scientific development of that country. In an exponential progression the standard of advancement of
American’s life, as measured by the continuous increase in their per capita GDP, was fostered over more than
130 years. This includes the periods when the American Society had to face times of economic depression,
as indeed has been the trajectory of many countries. In Brazil, despite our scientific path is much more
recent, economic and social advances were also recognized as a result of scientific and technological
development. Such a development has been made based on various scientists, pioneers of our science
starting with José Bonifácio de Andrada e Silva, the Patriarch of Independence, Alberto Santos Dumont and
many others who followed them. In fact outstanding contributions to our technological and social advances
appear in agriculture, in the search for oil in oceanic deep waters, banking automation, tropical medicine and
dentistry, as well in the paper and metal-mechanical industry, aircrafts production, architecture and in
engineering and civil construction, and more recently several advances in social policies, such as the Sistema
Único de Saúde (SUS). Important aspect for the scientific and technological development of Brazil, with
recognized impacts on social performance in many areas, has been the advent of our enviable multifaceted
system of funding agencies for Science, Technology and Innovation (S,T&I). Such a system, settled in diverse
agencies of the federal and state governments, has no similar models in many countries at a similar stage of
development as that of Brazil’s. This sophisticated support system to scientific activities has been able to, in
a greater or lesser degree of efficiency, provide the means necessary for the scientific development of the
country. This feature could be better represented in other countries, since nowadays many nations seek an
entry on the world scenario by means of scientific research. Indeed, the production of more than 8.5 million
articles published in the five-year period from 2009 to 2013, had the contribution of 226 countries on all
continents (Haeffner, Zannoto and Guimarães, 2015) (2). The data confirm that these countries, regardless of
their stage of development, have sought to participate in the new knowledge generation process and to take
up a position in the world ranking of science. This fact underlies the current realization that education and
science are components of a process that supports technology development, constituting basis for business
innovation, progress and economic strength of nations. From this evidence, it can be assumed that
government funding for research is intended to underpin the development of countries, not only feed the
work, dedication and even the vanity of scientists as many people think. In fact most well succeeded
countries are applying not less than 2.0% of their GNP to support science and technology development.
2. Brazil: 30 Years of Science: The information available in international databases clearly show an
extraordinary advance of Brazilian science in the last 30 years, coinciding with the commemoration of the
thirtieth anniversary of our ministry of science, created as the Secretary of Science and Technology by
Renato Archer in 1985, then made into Ministry in 1992 and finally the Ministry of Science, Technology and
Innovation (MCTI) in 2011. During this period the Brazilian scientific indicators increased significantly: indexed
articles, 11 folds; citations 60 folds and three times the Impact Factor (IF). Today Brazil alone produces more
scientific papers than all other Latin American countries together. Total production of Brazilian articles grew in
practically all areas of knowledge, with special emphasis on medicine, animal and plant science, agriculture,
chemistry and physics. Since 2000, with the creation of the CAPES Portal of Periodicals, the production of
review articles grew up in even stronger levels. Overall, the recent growth of the Brazilian Science can be
compared to that of some other countries whose growth rates are even more prominent. Comparing the fiveyear periods 2006-2010 vs. 1981-1985 (Almeida and Guimarães, 2013) (3), one sees that Brazil’s scientific
output increased 11.4 times between these periods, but some other countries have grown more: South Korea
86.7 times; Iran (73.0); Turkey (47.8); China (39.4); Taiwan (29.6); Singapore (24.2); Portugal (23.7) and Hong
Kong (17.7). The data witness the awakening of these countries to the importance of S&T. In spite of this it
turns out that only 24 (about 10%) out of 246 countries contribute, each one, with at least 1% of world
scientific production and together they account for 84.1% of the global total number of articles (2). It is also
noted that there is wide spread in the world scientific production whether in the fields of research, whether in
the numbers of production of each country and this influences the qualitative component (Impact Factor, IF),
the scientific fields, the institutions, countries and even the researchers. This can be seen with the area of
mathematics where the median IF of its journals is much smaller than that of journals from other exact
sciences, such as physics and chemistry, and far-away from that of medical and biomedical journals. On the
other hand, it is to be noted that international co-authorship in publications influences positively and
significantly the IF, as a consequence of the increase in citations of such articles. Nevertheless, in countries
with very low scientific production, the excess of international co-authorship (which is a very common figure),
distorts the qualitative component of the fields and furthermore it masquerade the scientific significance of
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
53
such countries. Noteworthy, several countries, including Israel, Austria, Scotland, Ireland, Belgium, the Nordic
Countries and others, which show a relatively low quantitative production, have elevated IF figures of their
science. Together these two features exemplify the dichotomy of quantitative versus qualitative science.
Certainly, such dichotomy also indicates the importance of science impacting positively the standard of living
of these country’s citizens.
3. Internationalization of the Brazilian Science: Despite of the unquestionable evolution of the Brazilian science
over the last 30 years, the qualitative component of this evolution is less expressive. Set in 13th position
among the countries that generate new scientific knowledge in the world, the qualitative performance of Brazil
is situated much below as inferred from the mean IF: Brazil’s 3.6 against the average IF of 6.4 shown by the
group of the 24 most productive countries. A strong contribution to this situation is the relatively low level of
international cooperation seen the in publications by Brazilian researchers. Indeed, among the 24 most
productive countries, Brazil ranks with the lowest rates (29.9% of articles) with international authorship,
contrasting with the average of 43% of the articles reflecting international cooperation in the group of 24
countries. As mentioned above, the level of cooperation increases the citations of articles and influences the
impact factor. An effort to increase the international collaboration of Brazilian scientists is therefore an urgent
challenge. Such an effort demands providing mechanisms to internationalize our universities through graduate
school.
4. A National Agenda for Research: An important component of economic and social success of countries is
derived from their capacity for planning scientific activities. This means to seek and relate issues and to
operate networks, aiming to bring together the actions of different ministries, their executive units of specific
actions and, in many cases their own agencies. The goal in these cases is to identify the country’s needs
and to establish a list of priorities demanding S&T activities in basic and applied research, as well as in
Research Development and Innovation (R,D&I). The prioritized actions define the investment budgets to support
advances in specific sectors for local or global development, thus unraveling solution to common problems. In
fact the planning system should be able to identify problems demanding a scientific approach, which usually
results in benefits for the society and its citizens. A level of planning with such characteristics can be found
in more developed countries like USA, Germany, UK, France, Australia, Japan, Canada, Israel and even in nondeveloped countries such as China, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey, Iran. For the full exercise of scientific
activities, the importance of planning lies in the definition of the means (human and financial resources,
equipment, supplies and setting strategic partnerships for the project) to be made available on time, in
scheduled actions, revised periodically. In Brazil such planning rarely occurs, even for administrative actions
and for science policy-reaching goals. Especially in science policy there is a recognized lack of this type of
formulation, and the actions of S & T or pro-S & T are often decided at the last minute. However a plan of
actions of S & T and R,D&I venture is much required for the country today. In this regard it is worth
mentioning the National Plan of Graduate Studies (PNPGs) formulated since the 1980s, always with
multiannual character, constitutes an exception to the rule. Such plans although usually formulated by CAPES,
included the participation of other federal agencies, CNPq and FINEP, state agencies and other stakeholders
such as universities associations (ANDIFES, ABRUC, ABRUEM, ANUP), Pro-Rectors Forum, ANPG, representatives
of ministries and the scientific community. Over the past 30 years, six editions of PNPGs were prepared.
These documents design actions for a period of years ahead and propose goals to be achieved in the
training and employment of highly qualified human resources, taking into account specific developmental
stage in each of the knowledge areas in the country, as well as considering their respective demands. In the
actual proposal (PNPG 2011 – 2020), the need for a plan of actions dealing with science development for the
country was detected. It was thought that Brazil urgently needs to establish a NATIONAL RESEARCH AGENDA,
making it possible to couple the country’s priorities with the actions demanding S&T approaches for solutions.
Through this procedure the actions of various ministries, other organizations and government agents,
demanding application of S&T solutions, would be coupled with the training of human resources, the main
objective of the PNPG. Such planning would establish strategic partnerships able to provide greater efficiency
in public policies generating positive synergy on state actions. What has been observed, however, is a major
difficulty for formatting such an agenda and because of that, what we see is the result of initiatives that are
based on the exercise of improvisation. Indeed, the Monitoring Committee of PNPG 2011 - 2020 has
encountered many difficulties in scheduling interviews and to obtain suitable information and plans of action
of the various state organizations. It is concluded that a coordination action is lacking for a strategic plan to
support the country's development. The creation of a National Agenda for Research is urgently needed and
necessary for organizing these issues.
5. Some Thoughts about Pharmacology Output in Brazil: Pharmacology occupies a prominent position and
recognition worldwide concerning its scientific production both in quality and quantity. In Brazil the situation
of the area is not different. Pharmacology is one of the highlighted fields in the national ranking of
production of articles, showing furthermore, extraordinary growth in scientific production over the last three
decades: from 227 articles in the five-year period 1981-1985 to 5,706 in 2010- 2014, an increase of 25folds, or about 8 times larger than the world growth in the same period. With this development the
contribution of Brazilian Pharmacology accounts now for 3.2% of the world production in the area.
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Concerning citations this breakthrough was even more extraordinary: from 391 to 21,834 citations in same
periods, i.e. an increase of 56-folds! The Impact Factor has more than doubled (2.4 times) in these periods:
from 1.7 to 3.8. The significant performance of pharmacology in Brazil is directly linked to advances in the
post-graduate programs.
References: 1. Press WH (2013) What’s so special about Science (and how much should we spend on it?). Science 342:
817-822, Nov, 2013. 2. Haeffner C, Zannoto S e Guimarães JA (2015). Cultura dos indicadores em Ciência, Tecnologia e
Inovação. Panorama da produção científica nacional. ComCiência (UNICAMP) 2015: 1-4. 3. Almeida ECE, Guimarães JA
(2013). Brazil’s growing production of scientific articles – How are we doing with review articles and other qualitative
indicators? Scientometrics, 97, 287-315. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-013-0967-y
Alternative approaches to lead generation . S. J. Enna, Ph.D. President, International Union of Basic and
Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) Professor, Departments of Physiology and of Pharmacology, University of
Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas 66160
Historically, drug discovery was chiefly an empirical enterprise, with the shift to a more hypothesis-driven
approach occurring in the 20th century. Whereas drug discovery was originally directed towards identifying
therapeutically useful agents prior to defining their mechanisms of action, it is now more common to develop
a target-selective compound before assessing its potential clinical utility. For neurotherapeutics in particular
this often yields ligands that may be useful as research tools, but worthless as therapeutics. Although the
emphasis on target identification, or "targephilia", has yielded novel pharmaceuticals, it has not facilitated the
drug discovery process overall, especially for compounds to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders.
This is because the targephilic approach requires a keen understanding of the relationship between the target
and organ system physiology, and the availability of in vivo and in vitro test systems that reliably predict
human responses. The fact that the majority of CNS drugs have been identified empirically indicates the lack
of knowledge about basic neurobiological processes and human behavior make drug discovery in this area
less amenable to a target-based approach than for other types of therapeutics. Improving the success rate in
CNS drug discovery requires a more pharmacometric-based strategy, with an emphasis on defining basic CNS
function in intact animals and a more systematic in vivo behavioral analysis of new chemical entities. Efforts
should also be directed toward defining the sites of action of existing CNS drugs to aid in the design of
second-generation agents and toward examining the CNS responses to drugs approved for other uses. Such a
program requires a greater balance between, and integration of, pharmacometric and molecular techniques to
maximize the contributions of science and serendipity in drug discovery.
Drug discovery strategies that lead to success. David C Swinney, Institute for Rare and Neglected
Diseases Drug Discovery, Mountain View, CA.
The goal of drug discovery is to identify medicines that can benefit a patient at a safe dose. Two drug
discovery strategies to address this are 1) target-based drug discovery (TDD) and 2) phenotypic drug
discovery (PDD). These strategies differ in how they identify molecular mechanisms of action (MMOAs) that
provide therapeutically useful efficacy and safety. These MMOAs can be considered ‘pharmacological hot
spots’ that include the target and the molecular mechanism through which the target provides a safe,
therapeutically useful response. The strategies differ in that PDD will empirically identify an MMOA, whereas
with TDD target validation drives the strategy and MMOA is rarely considered. A strength of TDD is a rational
approach to translate genetic information into clinical development and patient care, however its weakness is
the inability to predict a priori an effective MMOA. PDD can help compensate for this weakness. Ultimately,
the strengths and weaknesses of these two approaches are complementary. Drug discovery strategies that
combine both TDD and PDD will have a greater chance for success.
New neuroactive molecules against cerebral ischemia and cerebrovascular diseases in Cuba: For
the ways of effective neuroprotection. Nuñez Figueredo Y1, García Pupo L1, Ramirez Sanchez J1, Ochoa
Rodríguez E2, Verdecia Reyes Y2, Tacoronte Morales JA2, Pardo Andreu GL3, Souza D.O.4; Costa S. L.5;
Delgado-Hernandez R1*. 1Centre of Pharmaceutical Research and Drug Development (CIDEM), Ave 26 e/
Boyeros y Ave 51, Plaza, Havana, Cuba. 2Chemical Faculty, Havana University, Havana, Cuba. 3Pharmacy
Faculty, Havana University, Havana, Cuba. 4Departamento de Bioquímica, PPG en Bioquímica, PPG en
Educacion en Ciencia, Instituto de Ciencias Basicas de la Salud, Universidad Federal de Rio Grande do Sul,
Rua Ramiro Barcelos, 2600 Anexo, Porto Alegre, RS, 90035-003, Brazil; 5Laboratorio de Neuroquímica y
Biología Celular, Departamento de Biofunci_on / Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad
Federal de Bahia, Av. Reitor Miguel Calmon s/n, Salvador, BA, 40.110-100, Brazil
The neurological deterioration associated to the cerebrovascular disease (CVD), also well-known as ictus,
represent one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity at world level. These pathological conditions
constitute a challenge now for the biomedical sciences. 80% of the ictus is ischemic and, therefore, it derives
from the lack of appropriate sanguine contribution to a cerebral area. Inside the molecular events that have
evidenced in the ischemic conditions manifested this as a "not controlled" inflammatory reaction together of
free radical oxygen intermediaries release and the over expression of glutamatergic transmission generated a
particular situation with considerable neuronal damages. Result important to emphasize that some of this
process are irreversible and these are the origin of multiple sequels manifested in the patients with cerebral
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
55
ischemic attacks. In general, the organism exert different endogenous systems of neuroprotection; such as
early processes of activation of the GABAergic transmission, adenosine and potassium bombs; expression of
IL-10 and Bcl protein, among others signals; followed by later events of vasculogenesis, neurogenesis,
neuronal plasticity and synaptogenesis; which are able to diminish the damages in the tissues. However, when
the endogenous mechanisms don't respond appropriately and these physiological conditions are not able to
repair the damage, for their severity, or others causals, it is necessary to become an exogenous therapeutic
intervention. For these reason the research and development of molecules with neuroprotector properties able
to attenuate the affectations caused to the nervous tissues in the cerebrovascular and ischemic diseases
represents a line of high-priority for the investigation on the Centre of Pharmaceutical Research and Drug
Development (CIDEM). In this context, CIDEM has stimulated a new Neuropharmacology group of researchers
that working in collaboration with Chemistry and Pharmacy faculty of Havana University, in order to develop
an important neuroprotection line of research as the main objective to found new drugs. The presentation
showed the results of the implementation of experimental pharmacological methodologies develop for the
study of the ischemic brain processes and the evaluation of the effectiveness of diverse candidates of
neuroprotectors molecules, the exploration of its mechanisms of actions, using some in vitro and in vivo
pharmacological models that have been possible to select promissory neuroprotector compounds. These
studies represent an important contribution to the search of new neuroprotective products more effective and
potent using novel strategies of neuropharmacological modulation. References: Dirnagl OR et al. Trends in
Neurosciences 26(5): 248, 2003. Nunez-Figueredo Y et al. Neuropharmacology 85: 517-527, 2014. NunezFigueredo Y et al. Eur J of Pharmacol 726C: 57-65, 2014. Nuñez-Figueredo Y et al. Brain Res Bull 109:68-76.
2014.
Investigating cell surface receptor dimerization and complex formation with fluorescent ligands.
Stephen J Hill, Cell Signalling Research Group, School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham,
NG7 2UH.
Previous work in our lab, using fluorescent adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists, has provided novel
insights into the allosteric regulation of adenosine A3 (A3AR) and A1 (A1AR) receptors by allosteric ligands and
receptor dimerization in single living cells (1-2). We have also used a fluorescent analogue of CGP12177 to
investigate ligand binding to the human β1-adrenoceptor. This work has demonstrated that there is negative
cooperativity between the two different ligand-binding conformations of the β1-adrenoceptor activated by
catecholamines and CGP12177 respectively (3). Finally, we have used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy
(FCS) to investigate ligand binding to A1AR and A3AR in small 0.2 µm2 microdomains of single living cells (4).
FCS studies with a fluorescent A3-agonist have enabled high affinity labeling of the active conformation (R*) of
the receptor (4). We have also used a fluorescent adenosine A3-antagonist (CA200645) to study the binding
characteristics of antagonist-occupied receptor conformations (R) in membrane microdomains of single cells
(5). In addition we have developed novel ligand binding assays for both G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs)
and receptor tyrosine kinases using cell surface receptors tagged with a novel N terminal luciferase (NanoLuc;
Promega) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to a fluorescent ligand (6). I thank the MRC,
BBSRC and Wellcome Trust for financial support. References: May LT et al (2010), Mol Pharmacol 78:511-23.
(1) May LT et al (2011), FASEB J 25:3465-76 (2) Gherbi K et al (2015) FASEB J in press (3) Cordeaux, Y et
al (2008), FASEB J. 22: 850-860 (4) Corriden R et al (2014) FASEB J 28: 4211-4222 (5) Stoddart LA et al
(2015) Nature Methods 12:661-663
In
vitro and in vivo pharmacological characterization of cebranopadol a novel mixed
nociceptin/orphanin FQ and opioid receptor agonist. 1Caló G, 1Rizzi A, 1Cerlesi MC, 1Ruzza C, 1Malfacini
D, 1Ferrari F, 2Costa T, 3Guerrini R, 3Bianco S, 3Trapella C. 1Dept Medical Sciences, Sect Pharmacol, University
of Ferrara, Italy. 2Dept Pharmacol, ISS, Rome, Italy. 3Dept Chem and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of
Ferrara, Italy.
Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) via selective activation of the N/OFQ peptide receptor (NOP) controls
several biological functions including pain transmission. Evidence coming from rodent and non-human primate
indicates that the simultaneous activation of NOP and opioid receptors promotes synergistic analgesic effects.
Thus mixed NOP/opioid receptor agonists may have a therapeutic potential as innovative analgesics. This
study aimed to investigate the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological profile of cebranopadol. In CHO cells
coexpressing NOP or opioid receptors and chimeric G proteins cebranopadol stimulated calcium mobilization
with the following rank order of potency NOP = mu > kappa > delta. The stimulatory effects of cebranopadol
were antagonized by SB-612111 and naloxone in cells expressing the NOP and the mu receptor, respectively.
In a BRET based assay cebranopadol promoted both NOP/G protein and mu/G protein interaction with high
potency. The rank orders of potency were cebranopadol > Ro 65-6570 >> fentanyl in NOP cell membranes
and cebranopadol > fentanyl >> Ro 65-6570 in mu cell membranes. In the mouse tail withdrawal assay
fentanyl but not Ro 65-6570 produced dose dependent antinociceptive effects that were sensitive to naloxone
but not SB-612111 (both at 1 mg/kg). Cebranopadol mimicked the antinociceptive action of fentanyl eliciting
however longer lasting effects that were similarly sensitive to both antagonists. In the mouse formalin test
fentanyl, Ro 65-6570, and cebranopadol elicited dose dependent effects. Interestingly fentanyl displayed
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
similar potency (ED50 0.03 mg/kg) in the tail withdrawal and formalin assay while cebranopadol was more
potent in latter than the former assay (ED50 0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg, respectively). Collectively the results confirm
and extend previous finding demonstrating that cebranopadol by simultaneously activating NOP and opioid
receptors elicit robust analgesic effect in different pain models.
Influence of TRPA1 and other TRP channels as thermosensitive vascular sensors. Aisah Aubdool and
Susan D. Brain. Cardiovascular Division BHF-Centre of Cardiovascular Excellence and Centre of Integrative
Biomedicine, King's College London
Transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) is a non-selective thermosensitive cation channel which is
widely expressed in a subset of sensory neurons. Here, we have investigated the ability of TRPA1 to influence
cold responses, Mice were anaesthetised with (ketamine-75mg/kg and medetomidine-25mg/kg, i.p.) and blood
flow was measured in vivo using laser Doppler flowmetry. We investigated the effects of local cold exposure
to the mice plantar skin. Blood flow was measured before (5-10 min for baseline readings) and after local
cold exposure of the mouse hindpaw (30 min). Local cold exposure mediates a response consisting of
vasoconstriction followed by vasodilatation in the hindpaw. The cold-induced response was substantially
reduced in TRPA1(knockout) KO, as compared to WT mice and significantly inhibited by the selective TRPA1
antagonist HC030031. Additionally, the cold-induced vascular responses were shown to be significantly
reduced in TRPM8KO mice. The vasodilator restorative component was lost when mice were pre-treated with a
mix of the selective calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, CGRP8-37, the substance P
neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist SR140333 and a non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME,
suggesting a prominent role of neuropeptides and nitric oxide in this vasodilator component. We provide
novel evidence of a major involvement of TRPA1 and other cold-sensitive receptors in a vascular response
that involves sensory nerves in local cold-induced vascular responses in vivo (Aubdool et al., 2014). Aubdool
et al. (2014) Nat Commun. 5:5732. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6732. This study was supported by the British Heart
Foundation and a BBSRC-led IMB capacity building award.
Como o atual cenário político/econômico impactará sobre os Programas da Capes e a Pósgraduação neste mandato. Marcio de Castro Silva Filho (USP).
A CAPES tem desempenhado um papel fundamental na pós-graduação (PG) brasileira, atuando não apenas na
avaliação dos programas, mas sobretudo no fomento, redução das assimetrias e indução de áreas
estratégicas. Nos últimos 10 anos a agência teve um notável aumento no seu orçamento o que permitiu
financiar boa parte da expansão das ações previstas. Não obstante, a CAPES buscou novos parceiros para o
financiamento da pós-graduação e convém ressaltar os Acordos com as Fundações Estaduais de Amparo a
Pesquisa. Em 2015, frente aos novos desafios da situação econômica do país a Agência priorizou a
manutenção das bolsas (país e exterior) voltadas à PG e o Portal de Periódicos, com ajustes no orçamento
nas rubricas de Custeio e Capital. Assim, mais de 90% dos recursos foram garantidos.
Neuropharmacology of neurosteroid biosynthesis in the treatment of PTSD. Graziano Pinna Psychiatric
Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612,
Email: gpinna@psych.uic.edu; graziano_pinna@yahoo.com
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe, undertreated condition that affects millions in the USA
without a consistent effective therapy. Benzodiazepines, mostly used for the treatment of anxiety disorders,
are ineffective in improving PTSD symptoms. Allopregnanolone (ALLO) and its equipotent stereoisomer,
pregnanolone, are neuroactive steroids synthesized by principal glutamatergic neurons that positively and
allosterically modulate the action of -amino-butyric acid (GABA) at post- and extra-synaptic GABAA receptors.
Levels of ALLO are reduced in the cerebrospinal fluid of female premenopausal patients with PTSD. This
suggests that restoring downregulated brain ALLO levels in PTSD may be beneficial.
ALLO biosynthesis is also decreased in association with the emergence of PTSD-like behaviors in socially
isolated (SI) mice. Similar to PTSD patients, SI mice also exhibit changes in the frontocortical and
hippocampal expression of GABAA receptor subunits, resulting in resistance to benzodiazepine-mediated
sedation and anxiolysis. ALLO acts at a larger spectrum of GABAA receptor subunits than benzodiazepines
and increasing corticolimbic ALLO levels in SI mice by injecting ALLO or stimulating ALLO biosynthesis with a
selective brain steroidogenic stimulant (SBSS), such as S-norfluoxetine, at doses far below those that block
serotonin reuptake, reduces PTSD-like behavior in these mice. This suggests that synthetic analogs of ALLO,
such as ganaxolone, may also improve anxiety, aggression, and other PTSD-like behaviors in the SI mouse
model. Consistent with this hypothesis, ganaxolone induced a dose-dependent reduction in aggression toward
a same-sex intruder and anxiety-like behavior in an elevated plus maze. The EC50 dose of ganaxolone used in
these tests also normalized exaggerated contextual fear conditioning and, remarkably, enhanced fear
extinction retention in SI mice. At these doses, ganaxolone failed to change locomotor activity. Therefore,
unlike benzodiazepines, ganaxolone at non-sedating concentrations appears to improve dysfunctional
emotional behavior associated with deficits in ALLO in mice and may provide an alternative treatment for
PTSD patients with deficits in the synthesis of ALLO. PTSD appears to be a multifactorial disorder with several
symptom clusters and involving neurochemical deficits that may vary among individuals with PTSD. Selective
serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the only medications currently approved by the FDA for treatment of
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PTSD, however they are ineffective in a substantial proportion of PTSD patients. Accumulated knowledge about
the heterogeneous pathophysiology of PTSD thus suggests that treatments of the future should be
“individually designed” rather than “one-size fits all”. In the case of PTSD patients who exhibit deficient ALLO
biosynthesis and related deficits in GABAergic neurotransmission, ganaxolone administration may facilitate
recovery. Perhaps then, future clinical trials of ganaxolone should be guided by pre-treatment ascertainment
of ALLO levels and other relevant GABAergic system biomarkers as possible predictors of treatment efficacy.
Acknowledgement. This study was supported by National Institute of Mental Health Grants MH 085999 and
Marinus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., funding to Graziano Pinna.
Beta-blockers – exploring new drug discovery horizons in academia . Jillian Baker, Sheila Gardiner,
Christophe Fromont, Barrie Kellam, Steve Hill, Peter Fischer. University of Nottingham
During this presentation I will discuss two areas of drug discovery undertaken at the University of Nottingham,
both of which aim to reduce the side-effects of current classes of drugs: one by achieving super-selectivity,
and one by limiting the distribution of the drug in the body.
The first project concerns receptor selectivity of drugs. β-blockers are important treatments for people with
heart disease, for example prolonging life in those with heart failure and ischaemic heart disease and
reducing symptoms of those with angina and arrhythmias. However current β-blockers are not selective, thus
although binding to the heart β1 receptors, they also binding to β2 receptors in the lungs which makes
asthma and COPD worse. The presentation covers the development of very β1-selective beta blockers, from
medicinal chemistry, through molecular pharmacology to studies in rats that demonstrate their β1-blocking
effects whilst having so effect on β2-responses. These molecules have potential to be useful β-blockers in
patients with heart disease who also have asthma and are therefore currently unable to take β-blockers
despite their like-prolonging effects.
The second focus will be on drugs that are used topically but that cause side-effects because of systemic
absorption. β-blockers are used topically in glaucoma and have also been shown to be useful in the
treatment of infantile haemangiomas. However systemic absorption causes hypotension, bradycardias
(sometimes requiring hospital admission and electrical pacing of the heart) and chronic use in babies is a
developmental concern. This presentation with discuss the development of β-blockers that are esterasesensitive, that are hydrolysed by serum and liver esterases making them inactive upon contact with blood.
This method provides a potential mechanism for reducing systemic side effects of topical agents. Funding:
Wellcome Trust
Serotonin in panic and anxiety. Frederico G. Graeff. Instituto de Neurociência e Comportamento – IneC
Experimental results obtained with conflict tests in laboratory animals have shown that drugs that decrease 5HT activity release behavior suppressed by punishment. Because conflict tests are reliable animal models of
anxiety, 5-HT was supposed to enhance anxiety by acting on limbic forebrain structures as well as on the
dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (dPAG). However, results with stimulation of the DPAG showed that 5-HT
impairs proximal defense, pointing to an anxiolytic role of 5-HT. To solve this contradiction, it was suggested
that conflict tests generate conditioned anxiety, whereas dPAG stimulation produces unconditioned aversion,
related to panic. This hypothesis has been tested in animal and human models of anxiety and panic along 24
years and, so far, the obtained results are largely compatible with its predictions. They have also shown that
the antidepressants used for treating panic disorder sensitize 5HT 1A and 2A receptors in the dPAG and
medial hypothalamus, both of which inhibit panic attacks. The reduction of generalized anxiety, also caused
by antidepressants, would be due to desensitization of 5-HT2C receptors in the amygdala. Recent results
suggest that 5-HT and endogenous opioids act synergistically in the dPAG to inhibit panic-like responses in
rats through a cooperative action of 5-HT1A and µ-opioid postsynaptic receptors. These findings allowed
reconciliation between two leading neurochemical hypotheses of panic pathophysiology, namely: 1) that of a
lack of 5-HT inhibition of the behavioral and neurophysiologic symptoms of panic, and 2) that of a faulty
opioid buffering system that regulates both respiration and social bonding. They also indicate that opioid
agents with low abuse potential, such as buprenorphine, may be used as alternative or adjunctive treatment
of panic disorder. Financial support: CNPq Senior Fellowship
Symposia
Pharmacological targeting of intracellular proteases for diseases of oxidative stress . Richard Schulz,
Departments of Pediatrics & Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton
AB Canada. richard.schulz@ualberta.ca
Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are best understood for their biological actions to proteolyse extracellular
matrix proteins to cause tissue remodeling, both physiological and pathological. It is now clear that they have
several intracellular functions. My lab discovered that MMP-2, found in almost every cell type, also localizes to
specific subcellular organelles and has unique susceptible protein targets inside the cardiac myocyte and
other cells. We recently found that a combination of MMP-2 signal sequence quality, as well as its splicing,
dictate its distribution between the cytosol and the secretory pathway. MMP-2 is activated directly by oxidative
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stress (in the form of peroxynitrite) to a S-glutathiolated Cys derivative which is catalytically active and
distinct from its secreted form. It is an integral sarcomeric protein localized to thin, thick and intermediate
(titin) filaments, most prominently at the Z-line, and is also found in nuclei, mitochondria, the mitochondrial
associated membrane, and caveolae. During oxidative stress injury in the heart, MMP-2 is rapidly activated
and cleaves specific sarcomeric and cytoskeletal targets including troponin I, alpha-actinin, myosin light chain1, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and titin. The cleavage of these sarcomeric proteins results in the rapid
loss of contractile function. MMP inhibitor drugs prevent the cleavage of these targets and protect the heart
from oxidative stress injury by preventing inefficient contractile function. We also found that several caspase
and calpain inhibitors have MMP inhibitory activity, thus processes ascribed to these proteases could be MMP
dependent. Such drugs, including doxycycline, which possesses MMP inhibitory properties distinct from its
antibacterial actions, are promising new therapies for the treatment of ischemic heart disease and heart
failure. Post-translational modifications of intracellular MMP-2, including S-glutathiolation and its
phosphorylation, will allow the development of inhibitors specifically targeting intracellular but not extracellular
MMP-2, and should be useful in treating diseases caused by oxidative stress in the body.
Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases as a potential alternative to control maladaptive vascular
remodeling in hypertension. Michele Mazzaron de Castro, PhD, Professor. Department of Pharmacology,
Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo
The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are well known for their ability in degrading several components of the
extracellular matrix, which contribute to tissue remodeling in many pathophysiological conditions. MMP-2
notably contributes to hypertension-induced cardiovascular dysfunction and chronic maladaptive remodeling,
which lead to the development of many other cardiovascular diseases. MMP-2 is more recently found to be
also an intracellular protease, which is mainly located in the contractile apparatus of cardiac myocytes and
vascular smooth muscle cells. Previous studies showed that calponin-1 and troponin I were cleaved by MMP-2
in the vasculature and hearts in some oxidative stress-related cardiovascular diseases. Calponin-1 is a 34 kDa
protein located in the contractile apparatus of vascular smooth muscle cells. Calponin contributes to the
regulation of vascular tone and it is a marker of cell differentiation. Decreased levels of calponin-1 are
intrinsically related with vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration, thus may contributing to
intima hyperplasia and remodeling. Our laboratory is showing that inhibition of MMPs prevented the loss of
calponin-1 in aortas of hypertensive rats, and this effect may contribute to reduce the resulting chronic
vascular remodeling. Therefore, in this lecture, it will be discussed how MMP-2 may mediate hypertensioninduced vascular remodeling. The MMP inhibitors may be useful not only as pharmacological tools in
experimental research, but instead, as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of hypertension and its
cardiovascular complications. Financial support: FAPESP, CAPES e CNPQ.
From the tissue microenvironment to the cell nucleus: ECM-signaling regulation of mammary gland
morphogenesis and cancer. Alexandre Bruni Cardoso. Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Chemistry,
University of São Paulo
Cell behavior and tissue homeostasis are not exclusively controlled by soluble signals. Microenvironmental
factors such as the extracellular matrix (ECM) arrangement, tissue architecture and mechanical forces are
sources of signals capable of determining a cell’s fate. By using physiologically relevant assays of 3D culture
in combination with molecular biology, biochemistry, bioinformatics and live-cell microscopy tools, our
laboratory seeks at understanding how cues from the tissue microenvironment reach the cell nucleus altering
gene expression programs that control cell behavior during mammary gland morphogenesis and cancer. In this
talk, I will present preliminary on “molecular relays” for signaling from the basement membrane (BM), a
specialized ECM that regulates cell survival, quiescence and differentiation. We found that “normal” and
malignant mammary cells respond differently to the growth-suppressive signals from the BM. “Normal” cells
become quiescent when treated with laminin-111, an essential BM protein, whereas malignant cells are
refractory to the treatment and continue to proliferate at the same rate as the untreated cells. Bioinformatics
analysis of gene expression profiles of normal and tumor tissues and also experimental data point that
molecular signaling that connects the ECM to the cell nucleus is disrupted in malignant cells. We believe that
the conclusion of these studies will bring details of the ECM-regulation of cell proliferation and invasion,
which are crucial processes in tissue morphogenesis and in cancer initiation and progression. Funding: FAPESP
and CNPq
Novel experimental evidence on the mechanisms underlying chronic tooth pulp pain. Maria Martha
Campos (PUC-RS)
Pain affecting the orofacial area is rather complex, displaying peculiar patterns of transmission. This
presentation will cover the main recent findings regarding the mechanisms underlying the orofacial pain,
based on the available current literature on either human or animal studies of tooth pulp inflammatory pain.
Experimentally, the induction of tooth pulp pain can be accomplished by electrical stimulation or by the
application of chemical irritants, such as oil mustard, capsaicin and carrageenan. Additionally, tooth pulp
inflammation can be elicited by the exposure to infectious agents, including bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS),
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Complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) or human caries. Irrespective of the kind of stimulation, both peripheral and
central pathways are likely involved in tooth pulp inflammatory pain. Of note, the trigeminal subnucleus
caudalis (also named medullary dorsal horn) has been demonstrated as a pivotal anatomical site related to
the transmission of nociceptive information from the tooth pulp to higher brain centers of pain processing.
Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that pain transmission after tooth pulp inflammation relies on the
activation of MAP-kinases ERK and p38, besides microglia stimulation. Studies on this matter might well
contribute to further understanding of dental and other orofacial pain-related states and their management.
Inverse agonist of type-1 cannabinoid receptors as a tool for the treatment for chronic pain.
Camila Squarzoni Dale. Departamento de Anatomia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, USP
Neuropathic pain is one of the most insurgent conditions to antalgic treatment, representing a challenge to
health professionals involved and a serious problem in modern society. Due to the complexity of the
mechanisms involved, the treatment of neuropathic pain is often ineffective and although there is progress in
the development of new analgesics, the need for therapeutic agents capable of blocking the abnormal painful
sensation without affecting the normal abilities of patients still has not been found. Type-1 cannabinoid
receptors (CB1R) are, among the members of the G-protein coupled receptors family, one of the most
abundant in the central nervous system. Furthermore, CB1R are primarily responsible for the effect of
cannabinoids in nociceptive pathways, and the expression of these receptors is demonstrated in areas
involved in nociceptive transmission and processing. Although they are seen as promising targets for the
development of drugs to treat various pathophysiological conditions, clinical and preclinical trials show that
CB1R agonists usually produce unwanted effect in the CNS. CB1 agonists are generally psychoactive and are
at risk of dependence, hindering optimization doses in clinical and pre-clinical tests. Thus, the development of
drugs capable of binding to cannabinoid receptors without psychoactive effects offer therapeutic potential
without the risk of adverse effects, becoming valuable tools for the treatment of numerous disorders related
to cannabinoid system. Hemopressin (Hp), a nonapeptide (PVNFKFLSH) isolated from hemoglobin alpha chain,
is an inverse agonist CB1R, which induces antinociception in different experimental models. Its effect is
specific to nociception blockade and occurs thought the inhibition of nociceptive activation at spinal level,
directly in sensory neurons and involves CB1 receptors, glial cells and Mu opiod receptors. This peptide is
able to block pain experimentally when injected locally, administered orally or injected intrathecally, without
inducing motor abnormalities, sedative or CNS depressant effects, generally associated with CB1R-binding
compounds, making hemopressin a strong candidate for therapeutic purposes.
Novel targets for neuropathic pain control. Thiago M. Cunha (USP)
There is growing body of evidence showing that the development of pathological pain (neuropathic and
inflammatory) depends neuron-immune interactions across the nociceptive system. In this talk, these
mechanisms will be present focusing on the role of infiltrating leukocytes, patter recognition receptors (TLRs
and NLRs) and their endogenous ligands.
Tardive dyskinesia: The contribution of Professor Roberto Frussa Filho to the comprehension of the
disease. Maria Aparecida B. F. Vital. Departamento de Farmacologia - Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR).
In this presentation we will discuss the pathophysiology of Tardive Dyskinesia and an important contribution
of Professor Doctor Roberto Frussa Filho in this area. Tardive dyskinesia is a syndrome characterized by
repetitive involuntary movements, usually involving mouth, face and tongue and sometimes limb and trunk
musculature. The syndrome is considered to be a late-onset adverse effect of prolonged administration of
antipsychotic drugs, mainly the neuroleptics. It usually persists for months after the drug has been stopped
and may be irreversible. The pathophysiology of tardive dyskinesia is complex, multifactorial and still not fully
understood. Dr. Frussa Filho studied many different neurotransmitters involved in the pathology such as
dopamine, gaba and glutamate. However, a great number of drugs were tried for the management of this
motor disturbance, yet until now no effective and standard treatment has been found. In rats, abrupt
withdrawal from long-term neuroleptic treatment not only enhanced general activity observed in an open-field
but also the responses to apomorphine-induced stereotyped behaviour. These effects have been considered to
be a consequence of the development of supersensitivity of central dopaminergic pathways (Bernardi and
Palermo-Neto, 1979; Bernardi et al., 1981; Palermo-Neto, 1982, Felicio et al., 1987, Frussa-Filho and PalermoNeto, 1988, 1990, 1991, Vital et al., 1995). In this line, in 1994 Janet Neisewander suggested that reserpineinduced oral dyskinesia in rats may provide a new animal model of tardive dyskinesia. Indeed, rats treated
with this monoamine depleting agent develop orofacial dyskinesia characterized by twitching of the facial
musculature, vacuous chewing movements and tongue protrusions (Neisewander et al., 1991a; 1991b; 1994).
Dr. Frussa Filho and his Group studied this model and described many factors which are related to the
development of tardive dyskinesia. In this regard, age is the single most frequently implicated risk factor
increasing both the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia and the severity and persistence of the condition.
Moreover, they also showed the contribution of the gender, strain, and the role of the oxidative stress in the
pathophysiology of the disease (Abílio et al., 2002, 2003; Araújo et al., 2004; Castro et al., 2006; Faria et al.,
2005; Silva et al., 2002; Peixoto et al., 2003, 2005). Despite these efforts tardive dyskinesia continues to be
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an important clinical problem without effective therapies. Further experiments might help to understand the
disease and the treatment.
On memory and reminiscence of Roberto Frussa Filho. Jorge A. Quillfeldt, Depto de Biofísica, IB, and
P.P.G. em Neurociências, ICBS – UFRGS
Roberto Frussa Filho was a young and highly productive brazilian neuroscientist working in the pharmacology
of behaviour and cognition, that unfurtunately died at his best age of 53 in september 20, 2013. In this
presentation we will review and discuss some of his main papers on learning and memory, a subject that
comprises at least one third of his noteworthy scientific production of almost 140 papers. Roberto has
studied different aspects of memory formation from the point of view of different neurochemical systems and
cognitive modalities, with a constant eye on the methodological limitations intrinsic to every known
experimental behavioral model, or “task”. The effort to effectively control and distinguish the otherwise
inextricably intermingled aspects of cognition - such as attention, emotion and memory itself – lead him to
develop and validate a version of the Elevated Plus Maze that would simultaneously measure anxiety and
memory, the Plus-Maze Discriminative Avoidance Task. Employing this and other tools Roberto and his
students approached the most diverse themes, going from different neuropathologies that affect retention to
particular phenomena such as One-Trial Tolerance. His thoughful and intense academic production reveals
how his inquisitive mind work, but only in part: in order to understand and celebrate the scientist and the
great human being that left us so early, some reminiscences and recollections on his person and thoughs will
be woven together with what is on print. Roberto is and will continually be missed, not only as a unique
asset of brazilian academic community - a strongly ethical and fully accomplished scientist-intellectual - but
above all, as a friend and collegue..
Sleep privation and our current society . Monica Levy Andersen (Unifesp_EPM)
Sleep is an activity that occupies approximately one third of our lives and is fundamental to our physical
well-being, good mental and emotional health. Compared to the pre-industrial world, the modern population is
subject to ever-increasing pressure on sleep time that leads to the development of a constant sleep debt.
Globalization, the internet, and an explosion in information have added to the stimulus for competition
coming from a worldwide capitalist vision to promote a process of acceleration in a majority of societies,
increasing working hours and reducing even more the time for rest and sleep among all human beings. As
sleep scientists, we cannot just accept this situation. The investigation of the consequences of sleep
deprivation is an important step in direction of broader understanding of neurobiology of sleep. This talk will
address the association between sleep and its consequences, and remember the valuable contribution of
Professor Roberto Frussa-Filho.
Intervention points on drug abuse treatment. Eduardo Ary Villela Marinho, Universidade Estadual de Santa
Cruz, Ilhéus, Bahia
In this lecture the neural basis of drug addiction will be addressed, highlighting the points of intervention
currently being investigated to treat this disease. Most common drugs of abuse increase dopamine levels in
the mesoaccumbens dopaminergic system, which modulates both their rewarding and psychomotor arousal
effects. Thus, drugs that directly or indirectly modulate the dopaminergic system play an important role in the
efforts to develop pharmacological therapies for the treatment of addiction. Also, because the environmental
component of drug abuse poses a major challenge in addiction treatment, recent efforts to develop effective
treatments for drug abuse have focused on manipulations of learning and memory processes involved in
encoding drug-cue associations. Managing possible therapies for drug addiction must consider both the best
pharmacological targets and the perfect timing for intervention within the abuse cycle. Studies in mice from
our group will be presented showing promising intervention strategies to treat drug abuse. Apoio Financeiro:
Fapesb/CNPq
Ethnopharmacological survey of new diuretic drugs derived from Brazilian biodiversity. Arquimedes
Gasparotto Jr (UFGD)
Studies have shown that a substantial proportion of hypertensive patients do not have controlled blood
pressure levels, and the major reason is the poor adherence to antihypertensive medications. Older age, living
alone, and perception related to treatment control were significant independent factors associated with better
medication adherence. Cultivating positive beliefs that hypertension is controlled by treatment is one of the
most appropriate ways for adequate control of this pathology. Socio-cultural appeal from medicinal plants,
transferred by generations, translates an idea of reliability and safety of these herbal remedies, contributing
to improve the therapeutic arsenal and helping adherence to antihypertensive medications. Thus, the popular
culture is used in the identification of medicinal native species that can contribute to conventional treatment
and encourage the belief that hypertension control is possible and might provide additional benefit. In recent
decades several studies have been conducted around the world in order to evaluate the possible diuretic
properties of different natural products. Most of the studies were only qualitative and not dedicated
themselves to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in these effects. Only in recent years has been
published data that emphasized the mode of action of some diuretic plants and the relationship of these
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effects to their secondary metabolites. In Brazil, several medicinal species are used as diuretic drugs, but
most of them lack pharmacological studies that show the molecular pathways that might be contributing to
these effects. Nevertheless, these species require a thorough ethnopharmacological investigation due to their
extensive popular use as diuretics. So, in this presentation the main studies that are currently being carried
out in Brazil are presented. The methods and results from these studies are discussed with the purpose of
presenting alternatives for new diuretic drugs to be used when a complementary diuretic and hypotensive
effect is required. Financial support: CNPq and FUNDECT/MS.
Latin America network for search of new diuretic drugs from plants used in traditional medicine.
Dora María Benjumea Gutiérrez (University of Antioquia, Colombia)
Working in a network promotes scientific research, knowledge transfer and development of innovation projects,
aimed at sharing experiences, results and technologies. With this strategy, cooperation for development is
encouraged, with the participation of academic, scientific, government, and industry actors. Latin America is
the region with the greatest biodiversity on the planet; Brazil and Colombia are considered the richest
countries in these resources, which translate into a rich source of genetic resources. This, coupled with the
ancestral knowledge of its people, constitutes a unique and valuable position for its study and for sustainable
use, in order to promote social and economic growth. Particularly, in the case of plants used in traditional
medicine for its diuretic properties it is possible to identify research groups of Latin America with extensive
experience in toxicological, phytochemical and pharmacological studies aimed at potential application in
hypertension treatment. Given that the various research groups have different strengths in terms of
experience, instrumentation, access to vegetal materials, human resources, among others, the possibility of
networking is an option that should be taken into account to the extent that the research is strengthened,
costs are reduced and research knowledge is produced cooperatively in order to generate solutions to health
problems that go beyond a certain geographical boundary. In this presentation some examples of studies
being carried out in Latin America, which could be taken into account for the elaboration of a network
Project, are presented. The methodology that could be used, and the results that could be obtained from this
cooperative work, in order to obtain new compounds with diuretic activity, that are effective and safe, through
the exchange of knowledge, technology and experience among participating countries are also discussed.
Financial support: Pós Graduação em Ciências da Saúde. Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde Program- UFGD.
Brasil.
Regulatory information for the nonclinical toxicology studies and safety evaluation in the
development of new diuretic drugs from natural products. Paulo Roberto Dalsenter (UFPR)
The popular use of medicinal plants is widely known around the word and many plants are used for treated
different diseases. Tropaeolum majus L. is a medicinal plant popularly known in Brazil as chaguinha,
capuchinha and nastúrcio. It is native from de Andes in South America and the leaves are used as diuretic,
anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertensive. Many articles published in the literature reinforces the hypothesis of
possible diuretic and hypotensive action of this plant, demonstrating therapeutic potential for use in clinical
medicine. While studies show the effectiveness of this plant, it is important to prove their safety by nonclinical and clinical trials. The risks of improper use of medicinal plants has led to a significant increase in
safety assessment of these therapeutic resources. Evaluation with acute, sub-chronic and chronic toxicological
tests, as well as evaluations during pregnancy should be conducted to assess the toxicological potential of
natural products. Thus, this presentation demonstrates a script non-clinical toxicology evaluations conducted
to certify the safety of chaguinha as a possible therapeutic resource to be used by the population. The
purpose of this presentation is to discuss the importance of toxicological herbal assessments using protocols
approved by regulatory agencies such as ANVISA and OECD, using as an example the Tropaeolum majus
plant. Financial support: CNPq and UFPR
Hemopressin and its therapeutic applications for treating neurodegenerative diseases . Ricardo A de
Melo Reis, Lab. Neuroquimica, IBCCF, UFRJ
Hemopressin (HP), a nonapeptide derived from the α chain of hemoglobin, was initially isolated from rat brain
homogenates as a substrate for endopeptidases, and it was reported to elicit a weak hypotensive effect in
rodents. It was identified in 2007 as a CB1 receptor inverse agonist on neural cell lines. This is an important
observation as cannabinoid research in the previous forty years was essentially related to lipid
phytocannabinoids and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Here, I will discuss how type 1
cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) agonist (R)-(+)-Methanandamide (R-m-AEA) or inverse agonist (HP) acting on
mouse neonatal subventricular zone
(SVZ) stem/progenitor cell cultures can give rise to different populations of neural cells. CB1R activation
induced self-renewal, proliferation and neuronal differentiation in SVZ cell cultures.
Expression of CB1R was detected in immature cells (Nestin-positive), astrocytes and neurons. Stimulation of
the CB1R by R-m-AEA promoted neuronal differentiation, without affecting glial differentiation, at 7 days,
based on the number of NeuN-positive cells in the cultures.
Single cell calcium imaging following KCl and histamine stimuli, a method that allows the functional evaluation
of neuronal differentiation, increased neuronal-like cells. On the other hand, HP increased oligodendroglial
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differentiation in SVZ neural stem/progenitor cell cultures based on selective markers and monitoring
intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) following thrombin activation. We conclude that CB1R interaction
with different cannabinoid ligands can give rise to a diversity of cells in mouse neonatal subventricular zone
stem/progenitor cell cultures.
A novel therapeutic strategy to metabolic disorders: white to brown adipose tissue differentiation
using Pep19. Andrea Sterman Heimann (Proteimax Consultoria)
Proteimax is a small biotech company established in 2001, to create an innovation supply chain for the
biopharmaceutical industry. Proteimax developed a young and dynamic technology, with a successful team of
deep knowledge and experience in finding novel peptide-based therapeutic molecules. The company already
has four new peptide based drugs with exciting results, both in vitro and in vivo. The potential clinical
application for Proteimax novel molecules includes diabetes, obesity, chronic pain and cancer. Herein I am
going to present Pep19 a new approach to be used as therapy for metabolic syndrome. Background: Between
US$ 33 to 55 billion were spent annually in the US on weight-loss products and services, including medical
procedures and pharmaceutical products (data from 2008). Obesity, diabetes type II and/or hypertension
(metabolic syndrome) are amongst the major health problems of our time. This is an unmet need in the
market as there is no efficient treatment for metabolic syndrome. The cannabinoid system comprising
cannabinoid receptors (CB), CB1 and CB2 receptors and their endogenous ligands, acts to control food intake
and energy metabolism. CB receptors, CB1 particularly, have been identified in several peripheral organs and
tissues, including thyroidal gland, adrenal gland, reproductive organs, fat, liver, muscle and gastrointestinal
tract. There are several compounds that modulate CB receptors activity and, among them, the rimonabant drug that was used for weight reduction and thinning the waist was widely used in the pharmaceutical market.
However, this compound has subsequently been associated with the occurrence of psychiatric disorders in
humans, particularly for acting in the central nervous system, thus being removed from the world market.
Peptide 19 (pep19) is a novel non-natural peptide with cannabinoid receptor activity that does not cause
depression, acting in the peripheral tissue level is indicated to therapeutic treatment of metabolic disorders
and/or obesity. Pep19 oral administration decreases body weight, adipose index and blood pressure in diet
induced obese rats. This novel compound induces brown adipose tissue cell differentiation locally in the
peripheral white adipose tissue, which is the primary mechanism of pep19 inducing weight loss action.
Molecular and behavior characterization of oligopeptidase (Thimet Oligopeptidase - EP24.15)
knockout mice . Jair Ribeiro Chagas1, Leandro M. Castro3, Fernanda Dalio2, Patrícia Reckziegel2, Roseane
Durante Franco2, Bruna Visniauskas1, Emer Suavinho Ferro2. 1Departamento de Psicobiologia, Universidade
Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP). 2Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas,
Universidade de São Paulo (USP). 3Universidade Estadual Paulista – UNESP.
For more than a hundred years the chemical nature and biological functions of peptides has been elucidated
and gained a fundamental role in physiology. Albeit usually view as extracellular agents with intracellular
consequences, more recently it has become clear that a complex intracellular peptidergic system exists and
presents distinct and essential roles in cell functioning. Intracellular peptides are produced by the proteasome
and by peptidases such as thimet oligopeptidase (EP24.15) and neurolysin (Nln). EP24.15 is a
metallopeptidases, strongly localized to intracellular compartments, that seems to have also relevant
extracellular functions, such as hydrolysis of bradykinin, angiotensin-I, neurotensin and enkephalins. It seems
also to be involved in the selection of peptides to be presented to the immune system. The inhibition or
absence of EP24.15 can change the intracellular amount of peptides or the kinetics of extracellular peptides,
causing alterations on animal phenotype. Our group produced a colony of EP24.15 knockout animals and is
interested in identifying the phenotype of these animals. As many neuropeptides are potential natural EP24.15
substrates, we started our approach by analyzing basic behavior evaluation of these KO mice, like anxiety,
depression and potential for addiction. KO animals do not show evidence of changes in locomotor and open
field exploratory tests. Nonetheless the forced swimming indicates a depressive behavior. Reaction to acute
cocaine is significantly less pronounced compared to wild-type but after one-week treatment the place
preference test does not indicates differences in potential addiction. New tests will now be oriented by the
data on peptidomic analysis for different brain regions that are presently underway. Supported by FAPESP,
CNPq, CAPES and AFIP
Mapping protein interactions between AGH peptide and 14.3.3 epsilon by cross-linking/MS and
molecular modeling. Fábio C. Gozzo (Unicamp)
Chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool to study proteinprotein/peptide complex. The 14-3-3 proteins are a family of dimeric proteins that interacts with different
molecules involved in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and intracellular signaling, besides being associated with
GPCR´s. The binding of 14-3-3 can occur to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated partners and recently a
new natural, intracellular peptide was shown to bind 14-3-3 and regulate its interactions. The new peptide,
denoted AGH, is not phosphorylated but binds with high affinity to 14-3-3ε. To understand how AGH peptide
binds to 14-3-3ε, we used chemical cross-linking coupled to mass spectrometry (CL/MS), hydrogen/deuterium
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
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exchange (HDX) and molecular modeling. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the c-terminal region of
AGH is partially folded as alpha- and contains two acidic residues. CL/MS data presented a cross-link
between the N-terminal residue of AGH and Lys residue located in the 14-3-3ε main pocket. Docking between
AGH and 14-3-3ε generates a structure were the two acidic residues in the AGH alpha-helix binds to two Arg
residues responsible for phosphorylated peptides binding. HDX experiments reveals a solvent protection in the
main pocket of 14-3-3ε upon binding. By merging all the experimental and theoretical data, a AGH/14-3-3ε
complex model was generated that fits all the data.Financial support: FAPESP / CNPq
One
pot synthesis of surface-functionalized lipid-core nanocapsules. Adriana Raffin Pohlmann.
Departamento de Química Orgânica, Instituto de Quimica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
The applications of nanotechnology in drug delivery have grown exponentially in the past twenty years.
Biodegradable nanocarriers have been studied as a promising alternative to therapeutics. The control of size
distribution, by using self-assembly methods of preparation, affects the drug biodistribution and release. Some
advantages of the nanoparticulate systems are related to the drug targeting reducing side effects and
increasing therapeutic index. The presentation addresses the aspects of the synthesis of lipid-core
nanocapsules, an original type of carrier useful to encapsulate poorly water-soluble drugs, as well as their
surface functionalization producing the metal-complex multi-wall nanocapsules. The one pot synthesis
approach is an easy process to functionalize the nanocapsule surface. Examples of physico-chemical
characterization and biological applications of surface-functionalized lipid-core nanocapsules are discussed: i)
LDL(-) recognition and ii) Mucopolysaccharidosis type I. In summary, this presentation shows that selfassembled nanoparticles are promising devices for drug delivery and targeting. (CNPq, CAPES, FAPERGS)
Nanotechnology for drug delivery as a promising alternative to pulmonary diseases. Andressa
Bernardi. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz – Fundação Oswaldo Cruz
Inflammation is a central feature in the pathogenesis of severe lung disorders such as acute respiratory
distress syndrome, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, silicosis and pulmonary arterial
hypertension. All of them have high socioeconomic impact in countries around the world and can be fatal.
There is, therefore, a great scientific and clinical interest in studies addressing novel, effective, and safe antiinflammatory therapies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory lung diseases. Glucocorticoids are, by far,
the most effective therapy in the management of chronic pulmonary inflammation; however, the side effects
and the poor bioavailability limit the efficacy of such treatment. In this context, micro- or nanoparticles have
been frequently used as a pulmonary delivery vehicle for drugs. Nanoencapsulation of drugs can provide a
number of advantages over the free drug and conventional systems such as drug protection, improving the
stability, controlling drug release, targeting drug to a specific organ or tissue, and/or to reduce side effects.
Recently, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of α-bisabolol-loaded nanocapsules (α-bis NC)
in acute pulmonar inflammation induced by LPS. A sesquiterpene alcohol obtained by essential oil from
plants, alfa-bisabolol present antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Pre-treatment with α-bis NC
significantly reduced the increased lung elastance in inflammation induced by LPS. We also observed a
significantly reduction on accumulation of total leukocytes in tissue and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid,
highlighting the inhibition of polymorphonuclear cells migration. Additionally, increased levels of proinflammatory chemokines were significantly reduced in animals pre-treated with α-bis NC. Mechanistically, α-bis
NC were able to modulate MAPK signaling by reducing the phosphorilation levels of ERK1/2, JNK and p38
proteins. It is worth to note that α-bisabolol carried by polymeric nanocapsules achieved higher lung
concentrations than those of free α-bisabolol, increasing their bioavailability. Overall, polymeric nanocapsules
are able to successfully carry α-bisabolol into the lung, modulating multiple molecular mechanisms involved in
the inflammation induced by LPS and improving lung function by decreasing the elastance parameter. In this
way, α-bisabolol-loaded nanocapsules may offer new and potentially high effective strategy for the treatment
of pulmonary diseases. Financial support: FIOCRUZ, CNPq, FAPERJ and CAPES.
Modeling of disease scales for CNS disorders. Mats O. Karlsson. Dept of Pharmaceutical Biosciences,
Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
Disorders affecting the CNS are generally complex to their origin and multifactorial with respect to the impact
on life of the patient. Most CNS diseases have no cure and many are of a progressive nature. For some
biomarkers exist, but the relationship to the disease and its progression is often weak. Therefore, monitoring
of disease severity is typically based on disease scales. These scales are composite scores made up the
responses to several tests, tasks, evaluations and responses to questions. Most commonly the responses to
each item of the scale are reported as ordered categorical outcome and the total score is obtained by
simple addition of individual scores. Such disease scales are used not only in clinical practice, but are also
important measures of treatment effects in clinical trials. Despite their importance, there are many problems
associated with the use of these disease scales as measures of disease severity and treatment effects. This
include often long and arduous tests for frail patients, missing item data, difficulty in bridging between
different test versions and sub-tests not being informative for a particular patient category. The Item
Response Theory (IRT) was developed in the social sciences in the 1950s as a methodology to develop and
evaluate questionnaire data. It assumes that responses to items of a test are related to an underlying ability.
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
These relations are quantitatively described using probabilistic models. We have adopted and extended this
methodology to disease scales for different CNS diseases including ADAS-Cog in Alzheimer’s Disease (Pharm
Res. 2014 31:2152-65), EDSS in Multiple Sclerosis, MDS-UPDRS in Parkinson’s Disease and PANSS in
schizophrenia. Item response characteristics was estimated and baseline status as well as time-courses of
disease progression and treatment effects were quantified using data from large patient trials. Such models
hold the promise of more precise determination of the effects of interest, identification of the most
informative items from questionnaires, better bridging between test versions, better handling of missing data
and a better basis for development of biomarker to endpoint relationships.
PK/PD of Antimicrobials Drugs. Teresa Dalla Costa. Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Program, College of
Pharmacy, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Lately a worldwide increase in antimicrobial drug resistance has been observed. One of the reasons for this
reality is the misuse and abusive use of antimicrobials. Traditionally antimicrobials dosing regimens are based
on PK/PD indexes that relate pharmacokinetic parameters to the MIC ([fAUC]/MIC, [fCmax]/MIC and ft > MIC).
These indexes, however, use breakpoint MIC as a pharmacodynamic endpoint. Furthermore, unequally effective
dosing regimens can result in the same PK/PD index for a certain antimicrobial. PK/PD modeling offers the
possibility of relating antimicrobials free plasma or tissue concentrations to bacteria killing effect over time
allowing the optimization of drug regimens and maintenance of antimicrobials therapeutic value. Different
PK/PD models are available to describe the antimicrobial effect as well as the amplification of resistant
bacteria due to drug exposure. Established antimicrobials and antifungals can be revisited by PK/PD modeling
leading to more efficacious and less toxic dosing regimens with decreased likelihood of developing
microorganism resistance.
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An overview of the biological chemistry of nitrite and nitrate ions. José Carlos Toledo Junior,
Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto – SP, Universidade de
São Paulo.
The biological chemistry of nitrite (NO2−) and nitrate (NO3−) anions has experienced a growing interest lately
as a consequence of new findings regarding NO2− biological functions that may be clinically and perhaps
even (patho)physiologically relevant. Nitrite may have biological activity on its own but its effects are usually
associated with its reduction to nitric oxide (NO). In particular, the oral and intravenous administration of
nitrite ions that cause systemic reduction of blood pressure are associated with NO2− reduction to NO, both
in the acidic stomach lumen and by numerous metalloproteins such as deoxyhemoglobin and xanthine
oxidase, especially under hypoxia, although, this mechanism is still questionable. Nitrate is less reactive and
its effects are dependent on its reduction to nitrite by commensal bacteria. On the other hand, NO2− can
also be oxidized to the noxious nitrogen dioxide radical (NO2) both in the stomach and by oxihemoglobin and
heme-peroxidases. Therefore, redox reactions involving nitrite in different biological environments produce the
same radical species (NO e NO2). Chemically, local and concomitant production of these radicals leads to
oxidation, nitration and nitrosation of numerous targets. This chemical reactivity is of fundamental importance
to understand fully or to elucidate mechanisms of the biological effects of nitrite. These redox reactions and
their possible chemical/biological outcomes in different biological compartments will be discussed.
Mechanisms of antihypertensive effects of sodium nitrite and nitrate. Jose E. Tanus-Santos. Department
of Pharmacology, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo
Many recent studies have shown antihypertensive effects of both inorganic nitrate and nitrite, and their
antihypertensive effects are thought to result of the conversion of nitrate to nitrite by commensal bacteria in
the mouth, with significant amounts of the swallowed nitrite surviving stomach conditions and entering the
systemic circulation. Increased circulating concentrations of nitrite are then supposedly converted into nitric
oxide by heme-containing proteins or enzymes with nitrite reductase activity. Indeed, nitrite promotes arterial
and venous dilatation under normoxia, and this effect is explained by one-electron reduction of nitrite to
nitric oxide by deoxyhemoglobin, deoxymyoglobin or enzymes with nitrite reductase activity including xanthine
oxidase. This mechanism has emerged as a nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, and is now regarded as a major
source of nitric oxide (NO) independent of classic L-arginine NO synthases. However, while nitrite is known to
generate NO nonenzymatically under the acidic conditions of the stomach, only recently studies have shown
antihypertensive mechanisms involving chemical reactions taking place in the stomach after oral nitrite or
nitrate administration. At low pH conditions, nitrite generates nitrous anhydride (N2O3) and other potent
nitrosating species that induces formation of S-nitrosothiols, and there is now evidence that the
antihypertensive effects of orally administered sodium nitrite or nitrate depend on the gastric formation of Snitrosothiols, a mechanism critically dependent on gastric pH. These new observations offer an improved
mechanistic perspective to the effects of both nitrite and nitrate, and have major implications, particularly to
patients that are prescribed proton pump inhibitors, which increase gastric pH and cancel the protective
effects of inorganic nitrates and nitrites. Support: FAPESP, CNPq, CAPES.
Nitrite modulates mitochondrial function in rat heart and cardiomyocytes in non-hypoxic conditions.
Rafael de Lima Portella. Department of Pharmacology, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo,
Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil
Over the past decades, nitrite has emerged as an important signaling molecule. The majority of physiological
effects mediated by nitrite are thought to be dependent on the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide in
conditions of low pH and oxygen tension. Recently, we have shown that nitrite confers cardioprotection when
administered prior to an ischemic episode. This cardioprotection is dependent on the nitrite-mediated
normoxic activation of protein kinase A (PKA), which modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.
However, the mechanism by which nitrite activates PKA and its ability to target PKA to the mitochondrion is
unknown. Recently, it has been shown that PKA can modulate several mitochondrial targets. We hypothesized
that nitrite-mediated PKA activation can modulate mitochondrial function. Using H9C2 cells (cardiomyocytes)
and isolated mitochondria from rat heart, treated for 30 minutes with sodium nitrite (10-25µM), we showed
that nitrite increases cellular cAMP levels in cardiomyocytes leading to PKA activation. This cAMP increase is
due to the inhibition of the mitochondrially localized phosphodiesterase activity. Further, nitrite increases the
expression of A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP121), which localizes PKA to the mitochondrial membrane.
Consistent with the mitochondrial targeting of PKA, we show that nitrite induces the phosphorylation of Ser58
on mitochondrial complex IV (a known PKA target), leading to augmented basal and maximal respiration.
Ongoing studies are investigating the mechanism by which nitrite increases AKAP121 expression as well as
which PDE isoform is inhibited by nitrite. These data demonstrate that nitrite can be a versatile signaling
molecule, not only by inducing protein nitration and nitrosylation but also through modulating protein
expression and phosphorylation. Further, these data contribute to expand the therapeutic potential of nitrite in
preventing and treating cardiovascular diseases. Financial Support: Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento
Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) e Vascular Medicine Institute – University of Pittsburgh
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Toll-like Receptor 4 is involved in spontaneous fat and sugar preference. Roy G. Cutler, Elisa M.
Kawamoto, Mark P. Mattson, Simonetta Camandola. Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging,
Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, MD, USA.
The gustatory system allows animals to discriminate among foods in order to select nutritious diets and
maintain energy balance. Although a broad range of economic, social and behavioral factors influences food
choices, the immediate pleasantness generated by taste is still for most individuals the driving force behind
food consumption. Most animals, including humans, display an innate attraction for lipid-rich foods. In a
typical Western diet fats account for almost 40% of the daily energy content. The hedonic response to
palatable macronutrients, and consequent over-consumption of tasty high calorie foods, has been suggested
to play a role in the increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide. However, the mechanisms underlying such
eating behavior are largely unclear. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a transmembrane protein involved in the
detection of lipopolysaccharide in gram negative bacteria. In addition to its well characterized role in innate
immune responses, it was recently shown that TLR4 plays a role in central nervous system plasticity, learning
and memory, and cognition. Since the discovery that obese, type 2 diabetic, and metabolic syndrome subjects
have increased levels of TLR4 expression in various tissues, many studies have been conducted to elucidate
its function in the metabolic consequences of diet-induced obesity. In the present study we provide evidence
that TLR4 is involved in orosensory detection of fat and sugar. TLR4 knock mice displayed decreased
spontaneous preference for a high fat, high sugar diet, resulting in reduced food consumption and caloric
intake, and less weight gain. Compared to wild type animals TLR4 deficient mice showed reduced preference
for lipids (i.e. linoleic acid), as well as sugars (i.e. sucrose, fructose, saccharin) and umami (i.e. inosine-5'monophosphate) in two bottle preference tests. The altered gustatory preferences of TLR4 knock mice were
associated with decreased expression of key regulatory molecules for the detection of sweet, umami and fat
taste in the tongue epithelium. Experiments are currently under way to determine the cellular and molecular
mechanism by which TLR4 impacts taste perception and eating behavior. This research was supported by the
National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program.
Microdose lithium treatment in prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. Hudson Sousa Buck (Santa Casa-SP)
Hudson Sousa Buck.
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neurodegeneration associated with formation of senile plaques
and neurofibril tangles leading to impairment of memory, language and emotional disturbance. Nowadays,
treatment options target only the relief of symptoms and the development of therapeutics with disease
modifying properties still essential. In this way, recently we show the efficacy of a microdose lithium
carbonate treatment (0.025 mg/Kg/day/15 months) in preventing cognitive loss in AD patients. The treated
group showed no decreased performance in the mini-mental state examination test, in opposition to the lower
scores observed for the control group during the treatment, with significant differences starting three months
after the beginning of the treatment. Additionally, chronic lithium treatment (1.2 mg/Kg/day in drinking water)
was effective in prevention of memory disruption observed in transgenic mice expressing human amyloid
precursor protein (Cg-Tg(PDGFB-APPSwInd)20Lms/2J), with no changes in motor activity, compulsive behavior
and anxiety, suggesting that memory maintenance were not due to other behavioral changes. Mice were
treated for 16 or 8 months starting at two and ten months of age, respectively. Also, transgenic mice treated
since 2 months-old showed increased concentration of BDNF, absence of neuronal loss and absence of
amyloid plaques in cortex and hippocampus. These data support the therapeutic role of lithium in microdose
in prevention and stabilization of phenotypic and behavioral symptoms of AD.
Brain plasticity induced by cardiosteroids. Cristoforo Scavone & Elisa Mitiko Kawamoto. Department of
Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Science, University of São Paulo, Avenida Lineu Prestes, 1524, 05508900 - São Paulo, Brazil.
Hormesis is an adaptive response of cells and organisms to a moderate stress, usually intermittent, which
may have many beneficial effects to the biological system. Examples include exposure to low doses of certain
phytochemicals such as curcumin, resveratrol and isothiocyanates, exercise and dietary energy restriction.
Hormesis seems to act by mechanisms associated with cell survival and inflammatory response, involving
(tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, glutamate, modulation of transcription factors, such as nuclear transcription
factor -B (NF-B) and Brain Derived Neurotrophic factors (BDNF). Endogenous steroids, also called digitalislike factors, has been shown to play important roles in the modulation of renal sodium transport, arterial
pressure, cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, fibrosis, immunity, carbohydrate metabolism, and the control of
various central nervous functions and even behavior. Na,K-ATPase (NKA) is constituted of 3 subunits : α, β
and γ, with each subunit having a number of isoforms that provide functional versatility across different cell
types. The NKA α isoform plays a critical role in the modulation of learning and memory, in turn regulating
susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease. Cardiotonic steroids (CTS) are specific ligands of the α subunit. CTS
dose-dependently inhibit NKA ion transport. Recent studies have now shed new light on the function of CTS
as hormones, which activate a signaling function of NKA. Ouabain (OUA), an endogenous CTS, has been
described as a new hormone synthesized in the adrenal cortex and hypothalamus. Several studies identify
OUA as a physiological inducer of calcium oscillation and Src-Ras-mitogen activated protein kinase(MAPK)
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pathways, and indicate a novel and important role for the OUA/NAK complex as a regulator of TNF-α, NFB
activity and BDNF levels. The non-inhibitory concentrations of OUA have been shown to be protective against
some types of injury, such as kainic acid and Shiga toxin. In addition, OUA pretreatment has antiinflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in the hippocampus challenged with LPS induced inflammation. This
effect is mediated by NF-B activation, including in the neurogenesis associated dentate gyrus. The ability of
OUA to suppress inflammatory process and maintain hippocampal BDNF levels in the face of inflammatory
activity suggests that NKA signaling cascade could be a new strategy for pharmacological interventions aimed
at promoting longevity and healthy aging, as well as for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.
Financial Support: FAPESP, CNPq. All procedures were approved by the Biomedical College of Animal
Experimentation and the Ethical Committee for Animal Research ICB/USP.
Role of PPAR-gamma on the hyperactivity of HPA axis observed in diabetic rats. Vinicius de Frias
Carvalho Laboratório de Inflamação – IOC/ FIOCRUZ – RJ – Brazil.
Increased hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity in diabetes is strongly associated with several
morbidities associated with the disease. In our previous studies we demonstrated that diabetic rats showed a
hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to increased plasma glucocorticoid levels.
In this study, we investigated the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)- in HPA axis
hyperactivity observed in diabetic rats. All the procedures used in this study were in accordance with the
guidelines of the Ethic Committee on Use of Laboratory Animals of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, License LW
– 23/11. Diabetes was induced by a single i.v. injection of alloxan (40 mg/kg) into fasted rats and PPAR-
agonist rosiglitazone, PPAR- antagonist GW9662 and/or PI3K inhibitor wortmannin were given 3 day after
diabetes induction, daily for 18 days. The analyses were made 21 days after the diabetes induction and
included plasmatic ACTH and corticosterone levels evaluation by RIA; expression of mineralocorticoid receptor
(MR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), ACTH receptor (MC2R), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), PI3Kα and PPAR-γ
through immunohistochemistry. Rosiglitazone treatment inhibited adrenal hypertrophy and hypercortisolism
observed in diabetic rats. Rosiglitazone also significantly reversed the diabetes-induced increase in the MC2R
expression in adrenal cortex. We noted that rosiglitazone reduced the number of corticotroph cells and
inhibited both anterior pituitary POMC expression and plasma ACTH levels. Furthermore, rosiglitazone
treatment was unable to restore the reduced expression of GR and MR in the anterior pituitary of diabetic
rats. Rosiglitazone increased the expression of PPAR-γ and PI3K in both anterior pituitary and adrenal cortex
of diabetic rats. In addition, GW9662 and wortmannin blocked the ability of rosiglitazone to restore baseline
plasma corticosterone levels in diabetic rats. Our results suggest that PPAR-γ is involved in HPA axis
hyperactivity in diabetic rats via a mechanism dependent on PI3K activation in pituitary and adrenal glands.
Financial support: CNPq, FAPERJ and FIOCRUZ.
Chronic Stress and Pain . Iraci L.S. Torres. Laboratório de Farmacologia da Dor e Neuromodulação:
Investigações Pré-clínicas. Departamento de Farmacologia. ICBS. UFRGS.
Stress has been associated with plasticity in a wide neural circuit including cortical and subcortical circuits
resulting in chronic psychiatric diseases as depression and anxiety, and it alters the pain perception. While
acute stress induces analgesia, chronic stress is related to hyperalgesia and allodynia. Once, chronic stress
induces neuroplastic effects on pain-related neural circuitry, techniques to induce neuroplasticity on this
system would be a new non pharmacological option. In this context, transcranial direct current stimulation
(tDCS) has been suggested as a therapeutic tool for pain syndromes. Although the human results are
promising, it is still unclear whether the tDCS alters mal-adaptive plasticity associated with chronic pain. To
investigate this question, we tested the effect of tDCS in hyperalgesia induced by chronic restraint stress
(CRS) for 11 weeks, and we evaluate interleukin 1β (IL-1 β) serum levels, BDNF spinal cord, brainstem and
serum levels and TNFα hippocampus levels. Forty-nine adult male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups:
control, stress, stress plus sham tDCS and stress plus tDCS. Anodal or sham tDCS was applied for 20
minutes/day over 8 days. The hot plate and Von Frey tests were performed immediately and 24 hours after
the last session of tDCS. Then, the animals were killed and blood and SNC structures removed and evaluated
by ELISA. The stress group (exposed to CRS) developed hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia as indexed by
the hot plate and Von Frey tests respectively (P<0.001, n=9–12/group). The hot plate test showed an
analgesic effect immediately and 24 hours after the last session of tDCS; and the anti-allodynic effect of
tDCS as indexed by Von Frey test was also observed but only 24 hours after the last tDCS application (oneway ANOVA/Tukey, P<0.05 for both behavior). There was no statistically significant difference in IL- 1β level in
serum (P>0.05), but there was a statistically significant decrease of TNFα level in hippocampus (P<0.05). In
addition there was significant decrease of BDNF levels in spinal cord (P<0.001), brainstem (P=0.002) and a
strong tendency of stress effect in the serum levels (P=0.053) (One way ANOVA/SNK). These results support
the notion that tDCS reverts the detrimental effects of chronic stress on the pain system, and that the
alterations and peripheral and central TNFα and BDNF levels could be related. This study provides, for the
first time, evidences that tDCS can be a therapeutic tool in chronic pain, since it reverses the prejudicial
effects of a specific exposure (chronic restrain stress) on the pain system. Financial support:
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47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
PRONEM/FAPERGS,
02/2013
CNPq,
CAPES,
PROPESQ/UFRGS,
MCTI/FINEP/MS/SCTIE/DECIIS
–
ENG
BIOMÉDICA
–
Stress, Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis and Depression. Mario Francisco Juruena*, MD, MPhil,
Dip, CBT, MSc, PhD
Depression is a chronic, recurrent and long-term disorder characterized by high rates of impairment and
several comorbidities. Early life stress (ELS) is associated with the increased risk for developing depression in
adulthood, influences its clinical course and predicts a poorer treatment outcome. Stressful life events play an
important role in the pathogenesis of depression, being well established as acute triggers of psychiatric
illness. The vulnerability for developing depression is associated to changes in neurobiological systems related
to stress regulation. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responds to external and internal stimuli.
Reported results indicate that stress in early phases of development can induce persistent changes in the
response of the HPA axis to stress in adulthood, leading to a raised susceptibility to depression and other
affective disorders. These abnormalities appear to be related to the HPA axis impair in depression, partially
due to an imbalance between glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR). While most
studies have consistently demonstrated that GR function is impaired in major depression (reduced GRmediated feedback in HPA axis), data about the MR role in depression are still limited and controversial.
Therefore, in this presentation we will report findings about the consequences of ELS in HPA axis functioning
and in the responsivity of MR/GR receptors in affective disorder. Acknowledgments: CNPq, FAPESP, FAEPA,
CAPES, Royal Society, King´s Colege London. *MD from Pontifical Catholic University-RS, Brazil. Specialist in
psychiatry by Mental Health School of Public Health RS, Brazil. MPhil at the Department of Psychobiology,
Federal University of Sao Paulo, Dip CBT by Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research, USA and
FBTC. by MSc Affective Neuroscience, Universiteit Maastricht, the Netherlands., PhD from University of London.
Head of the Stress and Affective Disorders (SAD) Programme; Professor Dr at the Department of
Neurosciences and Behavior, University of São Paulo and Honorary Senior Lecturer at Kings College London.
Discovery and development of kinase inhibitors for trypanosome diseases. David C Swinney1, Brad A.
Haubrich1, Zachary T. Swinney1, Paul Guyett2, Rick L. Tarleton2, Kojo Mensa-Wilmot2 1.Institute for Rare and
Neglected Diseases Drug Discovery, Mountain View, CA., USA, 2. Center for Tropical and Emerging Global
Diseases, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
The goal of this work is to identify new mechanisms and molecules to treat trypanosomal diseases. Our
approach is to screen against genetically validated protein kinases from T. brucei (TbPKs) and characterize
the molecular mechanisms of action (MMOAs) to identify compounds for testing in parasite proliferation
assays. To this end we have established assays and screened focused compound libraries against four TbPKs.
We identified tideglusib as a time-dependent inhibitor of a glycogen synthase kinase, TbGSK3β. Tideglusib is
an irreversible inhibitor of human GSK3β with a good safety profile in phase II human studies. Tideglusib
inhibits growth of T. brucei and T. cruzi with moderate activity (IC50s of 2.3 and 4.2 µM, respectively). In this
talk I will discuss some of requirements, options, challenges and opportunities to move a preclinical lead to
clinical POC studies for neglected diseases. Funding from NIH 1RO1AI103476 to DCS.
Visualization of GPCR complexes by single-particle electron microscopy. Georgios Skiniotis (University
of Michigan, USA)
Single-particle electron microscopy (EM), devoid of the need for large-scale sample preparations or protein
crystallization, has been established as a very powerful approach for the 3D structural characterization of
biological macromolecular complexes. Recent advances in instrumentation and image reconstruction algorithms
have not only enabled high resolution structure determination by this methodology, but also the analysis of
conformational dynamics within the same particle population, thereby providing crucial insights to mechanistic
aspects of protein function. While discussing the basics of this application, we will describe single-particle EM
visualization on GPCRs and their complexes, as exemplified in a GPCR/G protein complex, a GPCR/arrestin
complex, and a class C GPCR. We will further discuss the hybridization of EM data with other biophysical and
biochemical methods, as well as the current challenges and future directions.
Novel local anesthetic analogues as candidates for asthma therapy. Martins, MA. Laboratory of
Inflammation, Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Anti-inflammatory treatment with inhaled glucocorticoid (GC) alone and combined preparations of a GC and a
long-acting β2-agonist are the most effective therapies for asthma. Most asthmatics respond to these
treatments, but some subjects require additional oral GCs, and the long-term use of these agents has been
strongly associated with adverse effects. In addition, a minority of patients is entirely insensitive to GCs,
reinforcing the need for new therapies. Local anesthetics, such as lidocaine, are used to prevent lifethreatening bronchospasm triggered by mechanic or pharmacologic stimuli. Nebulized lidocaine also exhibits
GC-sparing properties in asthmatics and has received interest as an alternative for asthma therapy.
Nevertheless, caution in its use is required since aerolized lidocaine has recognized irritant properties and
can cause initial bronchoconstriction, particularly in patients with reactive airway disease. The pharmacological
properties and therapeutic potential of lidocaine analogues, synthesized and screened for reduced local
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
69
anesthetic activity, have been investigated in our laboratory. Changes in the aromatic ring of lidocaine led to
analogues that combine reduced local anesthetic activity with increased anti-spasmodic and anti-inflammatory
properties in one molecule. Treatment of OVA-challenged mice with nebulized JMF2-1 or JM25-1 prevented
crucial asthma events, including airway hyper-reactivity, leucocyte infiltration (eosinophils, CD4 T cells), and
the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lung tissue. In in vitro settings, JMF2-1 dose-dependently
inhibited antigen-induced T cell proliferation and IL-13 production. Furthermore, T cells exposed to JMF2-1
underwent apoptosis as attested by flow cytometric analyses. This phenomenon was impaired when T cells
were treated with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD, and hence it is suggested that JMF2-1 mediates the
caspase-dependent apoptosis of lymphocytes. Altogether, these observations indicate that the protective effect
of these analogues upon allergen-evoked airway inflammation and bronchial hyper-reactivity may be
accounted for by the down-regulation of T cell survival and the inhibition of Th2 cytokine production. Finally,
it should be emphasized that the toxicity of local anesthetics, including lidocaine, is closely related to the
potency of the local anesthetic because toxicity is largely dependent on the blockade of Na+ channels within
the central nervous system and cardiovascular system. In fact, our findings indicated that the proconvulsive
potency of lidocaine was significantly higher than that presented by JMF2-1 or JM25-1, as expected by the
short-lasting and very limited anesthetic activity presented by these analogues, suggesting that they might
prove to be safer than lidocaine for patients with asthma. However, because, unlike lidocaine, JMF2-1 is
halogenated with a trifluoromethyl substitution at the benzene ring, experiments should be done to better
define the safety profile of this particular substance. In conclusion, these observations suggest that the
anesthetic action might not be relevant in the anti-inflammatory and spasmolytic activity of lidocaine and
provide support for the belief that compounds such as JMF2-1 and JM25-1, when inhaled, might achieve
useful clinical benefit for the treatment of asthma. Financial support: PDTIS (Oswaldo Cruz Foundation), CNPq
and FAPERJ.
Multi-target antagonists of α1A-, α1D-adrenoceptors and 5-HT1A receptors: potential new strategy for
treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia . Claudia Lucia Martins Silva, Laboratory of Biochemical and
Molecular Pharmacology, ICB, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by stromal cell proliferation and contraction of prostatic
smooth muscle mediated by α1A-adrenoceptors, causing lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of BPH
(LUTS/BPH). Current BPH treatment, based on monotherapy with α1A-adrenoceptor antagonists, is frequently
suboptimal since disease continues to progress, and recent reports suggest that stimulation of α1Dadrenoceptors and serotonergic 5-HT1A receptors contribute to stromal cell proliferation. Since BPH is a
multifactorial disease, we hypothesized that a multi-target based strategy could be more appropriate. Thus, we
investigated the potential of two N-phenylpiperazine derivatives - LDT3 and LDT5 - as multi-target antagonists
of BPH-associated receptors (USPTO No. 14370646). The primary assays (isometric contraction, competitive
binding and [Ca2+] measurement) evaluated the potency, affinity and efficacy of LDTs and used cells
expressing human α1-adrenoceptor subtypes and rat tissues enriched in specific on- or off-target BPH
receptors. Since the stromal cell proliferation is an important marker of BPH, the putative anti-proliferative
effect of LDTs was evaluated using stromal cells obtained from BPH patients. We also determined LDTs´
effects on rat intraurethral and arterial pressure. LDT3 and LDT5 have the desired efficacy and are highaffinity antagonists of α1A-, α1D-adrenoceptors and 5-HT1A receptors (KB or Ki: nM). Moreover, they have low
affinity (µM) for off-target receptors. Cell-based assays for viability and proliferation showed that LDTs are not
cytotoxic but prevented BPH cell growth induced by phenylephrine and 5-HT. Tamsulosin (α1A-adrenoceptor
antagonist) used as control did not block cell growth. In vivo, LDT3 and LDT5 fully blocked the increase of
intraurethral pressure induced by phenylephrine at doses (ED50 of 0.15 and 0.09 g.kg-1, respectively) without
effect on basal blood pressure. Regarding preclinical safety, LDT3 and LDT5 (1 µM) did not bind to hERG K+
channels and LDT5 (up to 100 µM) did not inhibit five CYP isozymes. Our results showed that the multi-target
antagonism of α1A-, α1D-adrenoceptors and 5-HT1A receptors by LDT3 and LDT5 inhibit human hyperplastic
prostate cell growth, while also relaxing prostatic muscle, which is a mechanism of action that differs from
the existing medicines. This project was early licensed which is a key step in academic preclinical drug
discovery process. If successfully translated to the clinic these two important effects may contribute
concurrently to slow disease progress and alleviating LUTS/BPH. Thus, we propose that LDT5 is a potential
new lead compound that could be of value for BPH treatment. Support: FAPERJ, CNPq, Biozeus
Desenvolvimento de Produtos Biofarmacêuticos S.A.
Preclinical
studies
of
ACH09,
an
extract
obtained
from
vinifera grape skin. Resende AC1.
Departamento of Pharmacology, Institute of Biology, State University of Rio de Janeiro
The prevalence of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases over the past decades has shown rapid rise
worldwide and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, mortality in most developed and
developing countries. Studies show that the wine has a beneficial cardiovascular effect and there is a
consensus that chemical substances present in the grape skin, the polyphenolic compounds, confer this effect.
Studies from our group have demonstrated that a hydro-alcoholic extract from vitis vinífera grape skin (GSE)
presents vasodilator effect dependent on nitric oxide and hyperpolarizing factor(s), as well as antihypertensive
1
70
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
and antioxidant effects. From a partnership with the pharmaceutical industry, our group has been conducting
preclinical studies with the GSE (ACH09), rich in polyphenols, mainly anthocyanins. We have shown that ACH09
lowers blood glucose in experimental model of diabetes induced by alloxan, and increases the expression of
the insulin signaling cascade proteins in skeletal muscle. ACH09 also protects against programmed
cardiovascular, renal or metabolic changes in the adult mice or rat offspring caused by maternal high fat or
low protein diets during lactation. In the present, we are evaluating the beneficial effects of preventive
treatment with ACH09 on metabolic disorders observed in an experimental model of obesity and fatty liver
disease. Treatment of C57BL/6 mice fed a high fat diet with ACH09 improved insulin resistance by increasing
expression of insulin signaling cascade proteins, as well as the lipid profile and hepatic steatosis by
decreasing lipogenesis and normalizing the excretion of cholesterol. These effects associated with the
antioxidant action of ACH09 may protect against the phenotypic and metabolic characteristics of obesity.
Therefore, the preclinical studies open a possibility of oral administration of ACH09, a promising natural new
product for the treatment and the prevention of hypertension, insulin resistance and obesity-related
abnormalities. Financial Support: CNPq and FAPERJ.
Neonatal ambient pollutant exposure enhances vulnerability to asthma and impairs vascular
reactivity in adolescence: Is there a role for TRP channels? Soraia K P Costa. Pharmacology
Department, Biomedical Science Institute, University of São Paulo.
Introduction: Fine particulate matter is a leading cause of global mortality, mainly due to cardiovascular (CV)
and pulmonary causes. Pollutant molecules relevant to respiratory diseases may activate transient receptor
potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in bronchial epithelial cell and sensory fibres. Although we showed that diesel
exhaust particles (DEP) and its chemical irritant 1,2-napththoquinone (1,2-NQ) evoke lung inflammation via
activation of TRPV1 [Arch Toxicol. 2010;84(2):109], whether early exposure to 1,2-NQ itself evokes lung
inflammation and consequently CV health effects via TRPA1 channels is unknown. Aims: We examined whether
early exposure to 1,2-NQ acts as a critical link, via TRPA1 channels, to enhance vulnerability to lung
inflammation and consequently impairs vascular/endothelial function in adolescence. Methods: Neonate male
and female mice (2-5 g) were nebulized with 1,2-NQ (100 nM, 10 ml) on days 6, 8 and 10 of life. After 33
days, mice were sensitized and further challenged with ovalbumin (OVA), and concomitantly treated with the
TRPA1 antagonist HC030031. Mesenteric/pulmonary arteries (MA/PA) reactivity and lung assessments were
performed 24 h after OVA challenge. Results: Neonatal exposure to 1,2-NQ in male, but not female, enhanced
allergic lung inflammation in adolescence. In female lung, increased TRPA1 mRNA expression and higher
catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were detected compared to the males. HC030031 treatment
significantly reduced 1,2-NQ-induced eosinophilia in male mice. Mesenteric artery responsiveness to
phenylephrine and acetylcholine (ACh) in prior exposed 1,2-NQ male and female mice was similar to matched
vehicle group, except that MA in female mice showed increased sensitivity to sodium nitroprusside as
compared to controls (EC50 6.59 ± 0.05 vs. 7.15 ± 0.10*, respectively). Exposure to 1,2-NQ did not affect
endothelium independent vasodilation in PA of both genders, but reduced ACh-induced vasodilation. Increased
TRPV1mRNA expression and undetectable TRPA1 expression were assessed in PA from both genders.
Conclusions: In male mice, early inhalation of 1,2-NQ confers enhanced allergic lung inflammation in
adolescence via, at least in part, activation of TRPA1 and reduced antioxidant defenses, besides evokes no
apparent gender influences on impaired endothelium-dependent vascular responses. This underlines the
importance of avoiding or limiting exposure to 1,2-NQ during vulnerable periods in development.
Acknowledgements: Fapesp, CNPq Animal Ethics Committee: 113/07/CEEA
Elucidating the role of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels in Aldara™-induced, psoriasislike skin inflammation model. Kodji, X.1, Aubdool, A.A.1, Andersson, D.A.2, Brain, S.D.1 1 British Heart
Foundation Centre of Research Excellence, Vascular Biology Section, Franklin-Wilkins Building, King’s College
London, UK 2 Wolfson Centre of Age-Related Diseases, Guy’s Campus, King’s College London, UK
Psoriasis is a chronic skin inflammation affecting 2-3% of people globally. Studies have highlighted the
importance of cutaneous sensory nerves as denervation led to psoriasis resolution [1]. We aimed to
investigate whether TRP channels are involved in psoriasis, in regards to skin pathology as in the Aldara™induced skin inflammation model. Male mice (20-30g, 6-8 weeks) were treated with 75mg of Aldara™ cream
(5% imiquimod) or Vaseline® on the dorsal skin daily for 4 consecutive days [2], during which cutaneous
blood flow was quantified using the Full Field Perfusion Imaging scanner (FLPI) and double skinfold thickness
was measured, confirmed by histology. We have characterised this model in C57BL/6 mice, showing
significant increase in skin thickness (P<0.001 vs veh, n=6), skin scaling “modified PASI” score (P<0.001 vs veh,
n=6) as well as in dorsal skin blood flow on the FLPI, reaching significance during days 3-4 (P<0.001 vs veh,
n=6). TRPA1KO mice showed enhanced skin inflammation, both in terms of dorsal skin blood flow (P<0.001 vs
TRPA1 WT, n=4-5) as well as skin thickness (P<0.001 vs TRPA1 WT, n=4-5). Histological analysis also showed
similar pattern of enhanced skin inflammation in TRPA1 KO compared to TRPA1 WT (P<0.05, vs TRPA1 WT, n=
4-5). Studies are ongoing to further elucidate the involvement of TRP channels, focusing on resiniferatoxininduced sensory denervation, genetically-modified mice, and pharmacological tools in this skin inflammation
model to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the interactions between the sensory nerves and immunological
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
71
functions. Funding sources: XK is a postgraduate research student funded by the British Pharmacological
Society’s AJ Clark Studentship. AA is funded by the British Heart Foundation. [1] Riol-Blanco et al (2014)
Nature 510: 157-61 [2] Roller et al (2012) J Immunol 189(9): 4612-20
TRPA1 role in joint disease: From basic to translational research. Elizabeth Soares Fernandes
(UniCEUMA)
Introduction: We and other groups have investigated the role of transient receptor potential Ankyrin 1 channel
(TRPA1) in joint disease. It was found that TRPA1 mediates joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis and
osteoarthritis. Also, evidence has implicated TRPA1 in orofacial pain and this has been linked to its expression
on trigeminal ganglion neurons. Whilst most of the data obtained are from animal models, little is known of
TRPA1 role in human disease. Aim: Herein, we investigated the expression levels of TRPA1 on peripheral blood
leukocytes as well as the levels of its endogenous agonist 4-HNE in saliva and plasma samples obtained from
patients with diagnosed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction with different levels of disease severity
(n=26), by using commercial enzyme-linked immunosrbent assay kits obtained from Cloud-Clone Corp (TX,
USA) and Cell Biolabs (CA, USA); respectively. Samples obtained from healthy subjects were used as controls
(n=11). Changes in peripheral blood leukocyte subpopulations were evaluated by flow cytometry on a BD
Accuri C6 (BD Biosciences-Immunocytometry Systems) and analyzed using FlowJo software (Tree Star Inc.).
Results: Increased levels of 4-HNE were detected in saliva samples from patients with moderate/severe TMJ
dysfucntion whilst TRPA1 expression levels on peripheral blood leukocytes was augmented in patients with
mild TMD (p<0.05). These changes were accompanied by increased activation of CD14+ circulating cells in mild
TMJ dysfunction patients (p<0.05) and decrease on the number of circulating T regulatory cells
(CD4+CD25+CD127low) in patients with moderate/severe TMJ dysfunction (p<0.05). Discussion: Overall, we show
for the first time that TRPA1 expression on peripheral blood leukocytes and the saliva levels of its
endogenous agonist 4-HNE vary with the severity of TMJ dysfunction. These changes may reflect on treatment
responsiveness at different stages of disease and implicate TRPA1 as a target to treat TMJ dysfunction. Also,
e draw a comparison between the knowledge accumulated from basic research and its translation into human
joint disease.
A indústria farmacêutica e os jovens cientistas. Julio Alejandro Rojas Moscoso (Biolab)
Desde algum tempo atrás, a indústria farmacêutica é uma das áreas de atividade no mundo mais rentáveis e
influentes, movimentando cerca de R$ 125,1 bilhões só no Brasil no ano passado. É composta por
numerosas organizações públicas (Instituições Educacionais) e privadas (Laboratórios e indústria farmacêutica)
as quais se dedicam à descoberta, desenvolvimento, fabricação e comercialização de medicamentos para a
saúde humana e animal. É de conhecimento também que a grande maioria das empresas farmacêuticas são
internacionais e tem subsidiárias em vários países, entende se por tanto que uma relativa fluência no inglês
é importante para uma mais rápida adaptação, além de interesse, curiosidade, espírito de investigação,
capacidade de análise e facilidade de interligar dados, entre outras características que fazem parte de um
bom cientista. O setor, tecnologicamente avançado, possibilita o emprego a muitos profissionais como
farmacêuticos, dentistas, biólogos, biomédicos, bioquímicos, químicos, microbiologistas, médicos e médicos
veterinários, profissionais os quais precisam reciclar seus conhecimentos constantemente. Apoio financeiro:
Biolab.
72
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacologia e Terapêutica Experimental (SBFTE)
Executive Secretary
http://www.sbfte.org.br
sbfte@sbfte.org.br
73
46th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Index of Authors
A
Abdalla HB
Abreu BA
Abreu E
Abreu FC
Abreu FF
Acco A
Acco M
Agnes G
Aguiar MG
Aguiar RP
Akamine EH
Alawi K
Albaladejo BT
Alencar AKN
Alencar NMN
Alexandre EC
Alexandre EMD
Almeida CLB
Almeida DAT
Almeida FB
Almeida FRC
Almeida Jr J
Almeida LSB
Almeida PRC
Almeida RKG
Almendra RB
Alustau-Fernandes MC
Alves BC
Alves CN
Alves CQ
Alves HR
Alves IA
Alves LA
Alves PR
Alves R
Alves VA
Alves VS
Alves-Filho JC
Alves-Junior M
Alvez CM
Amaral ES
Amaral FA
Amaral JH
Amaral RG
Ambrósio SR
Amendoeira FC
Amendoeria FC
Amorim JL
Andrade FS
Andrade SF
André DM
André E
Andreatini R
Andreotti DZ
Angelis CD
Anhê GF
Anicete-Santos M
Anjos D
Anjos-Valotta EA
Antoniali C
Antunes E
Antunes JE
74
04.060,
07.006,
04.056
04.038
08.017
08.019
04.044
02.021
04.050
04.016,
10.001
04.020
04.021
04.031
06.004
05.029
07.001,
06.013
08.014
04.054,
02.021
05.018,
04.043
05.005
04.062
04.004
04.029,
08.012
06.010,
02.010
13.004
05.022
04.034
11.002,
01.018
04.038
01.002
05.019
05.013
04.013,
10.002
09.059
06.022
04.013
06.018
13.008,
09.056
05.016,
09.007
09.045
08.008
08.009,
09.013
04.014
08.007
02.012,
01.002,
06.014,
01.009,
13.003,
10.004
04.009
06.031,
04.014,
07.001,
13.001
05.034, 05.035, 05.036
09.043
09.026, 09.027, 09.028,
07.004
04.055
05.030, 05.031
04.030, 08.003, 08.004,
06.024, 06.033, 06.037
11.011
Aquino FLT
Aragão KS
Arantes AC
Arantes ACS
Araújo AF
Araújo BV
Araújo
Araújo
Araújo
Araujo
Araújo
Araújo
Araújo
DP
DR
IGA
JSC
KS
S
TSL
Arditi M
Arévalo MR
Arfux CRB
Arruda MO
Assis DCR
Assis KS
Assreuy J
Asth L
Athayde-Filho PF
Aubdool A
Avellar MCW
Avila PES
Ayala TS
Azambuja G
Azevedo CB
Azevedo G
Azevedo GA
Azevedo PSS
Azevedo RB
Azevedo SV
04.038,
04.062
04.012
04.002,
10.007
11.002,
11.013,
05.007
04.057
06.010
13.007
05.030
04.029,
04.029,
09.017,
04.005
15.003
09.050
09.054
05.008
06.010,
06.036
03.003
06.033
04.021
01.015,
04.053
01.004
05.010
01.004
04.042
04.019,
09.015
04.001,
10.003
09.035
05.015,
04.019,
09.061
13.012
09.016
09.056
04.059
15.003
04.027,
08.012,
07.004
11.001
02.017
09.033,
06.011,
02.018
06.036,
04.037
01.001,
09.005
04.038,
09.039
02.021,
09.022
04.034
13.010
04.053,
09.056
04.011
04.030,
09.042
09.001
04.020, 04.023, 04.024
04.008, 04.010
11.005, 11.006, 11.011,
11.014, 11.015
09.017, 09.037
08.003, 08.011, 08.013,
09.019, 09.037
06.024
07.003, 07.005
04.023
04.002, 04.008, 04.026
B
04.045, 04.061, 05.001
15.002
05.024, 11.001, 11.007
08.014, 09.004, 09.006,
02.018, 03.008
02.013, 02.015, 02.022
06.015
07.004
13.004, 13.006
06.032
04.025, 04.033, 06.013,
07.002, 07.004, 15.001
Baggio CH
Balbino AM
Baldisserotto B
Balogun SO
Bandeira Jr G
Banderó Filho VC
Baracat MM
Barata LES
Barbosa ALR
Barbosa APL
Barbosa E
Barbosa MN
Barbosa-Filho JM
Barboza LN
Barcaro IMR
Barja-Fidalgo C
Barra A
Barreiro EJ
Barreto A
Barreto E
Barros FCN
Barros HMT
Barros MEFX
Bassi GS
Bastos AC
Bastos GNT
Bastos JK
Batista GLP
Batista JA
Batista JS
04.030, 04.039, 08.004,
09.039, 09.055
09.053, 09.060
09.003, 09.021
09.057
04.001, 13.007
09.035
03.010
13.003, 13.006, 13.010
08.004, 08.012
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Batista LM
Batista MS
Batista-Filho FL
Batisti AP
Báu FR
Becerra SB
Beijamini V
Beirão Júnior PS
Belizario J
Bella LM
Belo VA
Beltrame OC
Beltran CT
Bem AXC
Bem GF
Bendhack LM
Benevides MLACS
Benjamim CF
Benjumea D
Bentes Lima A
Bentes-Lima A
Berger M
Berlink J
Bernardi A
Bersani-Amado CA
Bertolucci SKV
Bertozzi MM
Beserra AMSS
Bevan S
Beys-da-Silva WO
Biacchi K
Biagi C
Biagioni AF
Bianchi PC
Bianchini AE
Biasoto ACT
Bicca MA
Bingana RD
Blanco ALF
Boeck CR
Boeing T
Bogo MR
Böhmer AE
Bonavita AG
Bonfante R
Bonfitto PHL
Boni MS
Borato DG
Borck PC
Bordin S
Borges PA
Borges VF
Borghi SM
Borin DB
Bortolin RH
Boschero AC
Bosier B
Bovolato ALC
Braga A
Braga AD
Brain S
Brandão V
Brasil TFB
Braúna IS
Braz C
Breviglieri E
Brito CFC
Brito GAC
08.005,
09.053
09.018
13.013
04.018
07.004
07.002
03.005,
02.018
04.048
01.004
06.027
08.019
04.058
04.011
09.009
06.026
04.018
04.006
09.063
13.006
13.003
09.057
05.003
04.041,
09.024,
10.001
09.012
05.017
11.003
02.009
09.057
13.008
12.002
03.002
02.007
09.061
09.031
02.009
09.039
06.014,
02.010,
08.008,
10.005
01.002
09.005
04.060,
04.025,
13.009
09.001
13.011
01.009
04.006,
04.011,
04.017,
11.009,
09.043
01.009
01.008
12.003
11.005,
04.047
04.021,
04.048
02.019
09.055
13.014
09.004
04.029
04.011
08.015, 09.022, 09.033,
03.006
Brito TM
Brito TV
Brito VGB
Broering MF
Broetto L
Brogliato AR
Bronze F
Brum PC
Brunieri LVP
Buck HS
Bueno PI
Burbano RR
Burkitt MD
05.016,
04.027,
04.058,
11.010
04.038,
04.006
04.048
06.035
09.038
01.002
04.025,
11.008
09.044
05.024, 11.001, 11.007
04.030, 04.039, 09.055
09.010
06.012,
02.013,
13.002
09.005
09.046,
02.009,
04.014
05.033
07.001,
03.003
02.013
06.002,
08.016,
03.009,
09.015
05.029
05.002,
10.005,
09.037
07.002,
04.049
05.023
01.009
01.010
05.028
10.002,
04.016,
09.028,
02.010
02.010
06.003,
13.014
11.009
09.035
05.029,
09.054
04.045
04.062
03.004
04.009,
09.009
09.008
05.028
04.020
04.029,
08.012,
05.011
04.001,
04.046
07.007
04.017,
04.013
09.018,
09.005
04.010
06.023
02.022
09.035
04.056
C
08.010
09.026, 09.027, 09.028,
12.001
13.005, 13.008, 15.002
09.004, 09.006, 09.013
05.034, 05.035, 05.036
04.056
09.046, 15.005
04.013
05.001
13.008, 15.002
11.006
06.022
Cabral PHB
Cabral-Costa JV
Calgarotto AK
Calheiros AS
Calil-Elias S
Calixto JB
Calixto MC
Calixto-Campos C
Calmasini FB
Calo' G
Camandola S
Camara H
Camargo EA
Camarini R
Campelo RT
Campos DCO
Campos MM
Campos MS
Campos RM
Cândido AGF
Canevese FF
Caperuto LC
Cararo M
Carbonezi LH
Cardelli NJA
Cardia GFE
Cardoso MM
Cardoso PA
Carlos D
Carlos E
Carmo GM
Carmo JOS
Carmo LD
Carmo MS
Carneiro FS
Carvalho CBM
Carvalho JJV
Carvalho KIM
Carvalho LCRM
Carvalho MA
Carvalho MGB
Carvalho MHC
Carvalho NS
Carvalho PR
Carvalho VF
Carvalho VFM
Carvalho-Sousa CE
Casagrande R
Castanheira FVS
Castilho GRC
Castro AB
Castro GC
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
15.005
05.005, 09.057
07.002, 07.004
06.006
08.017
03.011
05.023, 05.025, 05.027,
10.006
11.012
10.004
09.024, 09.026, 09.027,
10.001
06.008
09.039
08.001, 08.010
08.003, 08.004, 08.011,
09.017, 09.037
04.007, 04.028, 10.007
04.059, 05.001, 05.017
09.058
75
Castro Jr JAA
Castro KCF
Castro LM
Castro MM
Castro Musial D
Castro Neto EF
Castro NG
Castro W
Cavalcante HAO
Cavalcante HC
Cechinel-Filho V
Cecon E
Cerqueira ARA
Cespedes IC
Cezaretti M
Chaves AS
Chaves DAS
Chaves LS
Chaves-Neto AH
Chen S
Chiaradia LD
Chiela EC
Chies AB
Ciambarella BT
Cipriani TR
Clemente-Napimoga JT
Clososki GC
Coavoy-Sánchez SA
Coelho AL
Coêlho ML
Coelho MM
Cogo JC
Coimbra NC
Collaço RCO
Cologna AJ
Colon DF
Conde-Tella SO
Cons BL
Conserva LM
Contó MB
Cooper D
Cordeiro RSB
Cordeiro VSC
Cordenonsi LM
Corrêa FMA
Correia ACC
Corso CR
Cortés N
Côrtes SF
Costa AF
Costa APR
Costa AS
Costa CA
Costa DS
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
Costa
76
EA
GF
JC
JCS
KB
KM
ML
MS
P
PRR
R
RS
04.021
15.003
03.009
06.027,
15.004
02.002
02.008,
15.003
09.027
06.010,
08.014,
04.044,
04.036,
06.035
15.004
05.016,
11.007
04.040
09.039
09.010
04.005
10.005,
10.005
06.028,
01.014,
04.041
09.001,
04.057,
05.035,
05.008
05.026
08.002
08.012
05.007
09.048,
03.002
09.048,
12.001
04.013
06.021
09.032
04.038,
03.011
04.018
04.009
09.009,
13.005
02.019
09.035
05.004,
09.063
06.001
05.009
09.019
05.029
09.009,
08.003,
09.019,
08.018
09.009
04.009
08.001,
09.023
05.002,
01.003
04.030,
03.010,
02.005
02.009,
04.022
Costa SK
Costa SKP
06.034
13.009
06.024, 06.037
09.004, 09.006
07.007
04.046
Cotias AC
Coutinho DS
Couto GC
Crother TC
Cruz FC
Cruz JMT
Cruz JSJ
Cruz Junior JS
Cruz TCD
Cuman RKN
Cunha FQ
05.024, 09.007, 11.001,
Cunha FVM
Cunha TM
Cunha TTS
Cunha-Filho GSA
Cury BJ
Cutler S
10.006
06.030
04.001, 04.002, 04.008,
09.011
04.060, 05.032, 05.034,
05.036
09.051, 09.052
09.051
09.035
09.047
09.001
09.047
08.011, 08.013, 09.017,
09.037
08.010
05.025, 13.004
08.012
09.006
05.013, 05.019
06.022
04.003,
05.026,
04.009,
04.041,
04.009
04.005
02.007
09.032
04.039
04.027
04.054,
04.016,
09.028,
04.011,
05.003
05.030
02.009,
05.003
02.005
10.003
08.008,
09.063
04.036, 04.046, 05.020,
06.029, 08.016, 08.017
04.038
08.001, 08.010
04.055
09.024, 09.026, 09.027,
10.001
04.013, 04.061, 05.001,
04.011, 04.013, 05.001,
08.009, 09.006
D
D´Almeida V
da Costa GF
da Rocha LM
da Rosa RL
da Silva FMR
da Silva IRF
da Silva JKR
da Silva Junior PI
da Silva LM
03.011
09.047
05.034,
08.014
13.009
01.011,
13.010
09.008
08.008,
09.004,
Da Silva R
15.004
da Silva RF
04.032
da Silva RM
06.016
da Silveira Cruz-Machado S 07.007
Dal Mas C
09.008
Dalla Costa T
11.006,
Dalla Vecchia D
03.008
Dallazen JL
05.015
D'Almeida APL
04.041
Dalsenter PR
09.021
Damasceno SRB
09.055
Danesi GM
05.027
David JM
05.022
David JPL
05.022
de Almeida ACA
09.002
de Bem GF
09.047
de Bortoli VC
03.004
de Faria FM
09.002
de Lima ME
13.013
de Lima TCM
02.017
de Lira FBC
05.020
de Mélo ML
02.018
de Melo NFS
04.060
de Melo Reis RA
01.018
de Nucci G
06.013,
de Oliveira CR
02.005
de Paula MAV
05.020
de Paula RCM
09.055
de Sá Lima L
01.002,
de Silva JS
13.007
de Souza BP
01.013
de Souza CP
03.008
de Souza MF
03.010
Deffune E
12.003
Del Bel EA
03.001
05.035, 05.036
09.030
08.009, 08.014, 09.001,
09.006, 09.013
11.013, 11.014, 11.015
11.012, 13.011
02.015, 02.022
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Delgobbo MS
Deus FA
Dias AM
Dias DF
Dias DRC
Dias FC
Dias JB
Dias JL
Dias L
Dias MC
Dias NH
Diaz BL
do Monte FM
do Nascimento JLM
Domiciano TP
Donald GR
Donate PB
Donato MF
dos Santos DO
Dotto B
Duarte ASS
Duarte FS
Duarte IDG
Duarte LC
Duarte T
Dunder RJ
Duran CCG
Dutra MMGB
Dutra YM
Duzzioni M
13.007
09.023
06.036
04.026
13.003, 13.004
05.019
15.002
13.007
09.025, 09.029, 09.030, 09.038
12.003
04.031
10.007
01.001
13.010
04.005
05.011
04.013
13.013
06.034
15.002
13.002
02.017
05.009
09.050
01.017
09.002
14.001
05.007
04.027
02.017
E
Eloi FR
Erig TC
Espírito Santo RF
Estevam CA
01.016
10.005, 10.006
04.022
09.042
F
Fabiana DC
Faria RX
Farias JAM
Fassini A
Fátima A
Fattori V
Fausto LSL
Favaro P
Feijó PRO
Feio DCA
Feitosa KB
Félix MAR
Fernandes AJM
Fernandes C
Fernandes ES
Fernandes J
Fernandes L
Fernandes LDA
Fernandes LF
Fernandes PA
Fernandes PACM
Fernandes PCL
Fernandes PD
Ferraris FK
Ferreira
Ferreira
Ferreira
Ferreira
Ferreira
Ferreira
Ferreira
AC
CF
DM
FR
GC
HHA
LGB
05.013
01.018,
08.009
02.019
05.007
05.001
04.018
13.002
01.007
11.008
04.003
09.012
04.008
04.049,
02.009,
10.003
04.019,
06.019
09.007
06.010
07.007
04.004
09.034
01.003,
05.016,
11.004,
09.005
13.005
08.019
04.038
06.017,
04.031
01.018
04.009, 08.001
Ferreira LLC
Ferreira NS
Ferreira R
Ferreira RG
Ferreira RT
Ferreira TP
Ferreira TPT
Ferro ES
Ferro JNS
Ferro TAF
Figueiredo CAV
Figueiredo CP
Figueiredo J
Figueiredo JB
Filgueiras MC
Filippini HF
Fleck J
Florenzano J
Flower R
Fonseca FV
Fontana BD
Fontana V
Fonteles MC
Fontenele AM
Formiga RO
Fraceto LF
Frade-Guanaes JO
Fraga CAM
França CM
França KC
Franchi Jr GC
Franco RD
Frangiotti MIB
Franz-Montan M
Freire SMF
Freitas ALP
Freitas FF
Freitas KM
Freitas RDS
Frony AC
Frutuoso VS
Funck VR
Funke MG
Furtado FF
09.045
06.003,
07.001
04.061
04.034,
04.012
04.001,
03.007,
04.038,
04.035,
09.043
02.009
09.005
04.006
04.027,
08.012
05.025
02.003
04.003,
04.010
01.011,
11.009
12.002
06.012,
09.055
08.005,
04.060
15.001
01.001,
13.003,
06.009
10.004
03.007,
02.001,
05.032
09.054
09.039,
05.035
04.037,
05.002,
06.036
09.005
02.014
01.016
04.057,
06.008
04.040
04.002, 04.010, 04.026
03.009
09.035
05.005
04.030, 04.039, 08.004,
04.036, 06.022
04.032
06.023
08.015, 09.022, 09.053
01.008, 02.005
13.004, 13.006
03.009
02.002
09.055
04.047
05.025
06.033
G
04.050
04.021, 04.035, 05.005
04.023, 04.024, 04.042,
05.011, 09.045
05.024, 09.007, 11.001,
11.007
06.018, 06.020
Gallotti RMD
Gama KB
Gandía L
Garcez RA
Garcia DCG
Garcia TA
Garlet QI
Gasparotto FM
Gasparotto Junior A
Gavioli EC
Gentry C
Georgetti SR
Gerlach RF
Gers-Barlag K
Ghedini PC
Ghilosso-Bortolini R
Gil NL
Gill HS
Gimenez A
Giorno TBS
Godinho RO
Gollucke APB
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
14.001
05.022
06.025
11.009
06.001
15.005
09.016,
06.011,
06.005,
02.017,
02.009
04.059
06.021
02.009
08.018
04.012
04.019,
05.032
09.004
05.011
01.006,
06.006,
09.062
09.061
09.003
06.011, 09.003, 09.021
03.003
04.023, 04.042
01.016, 01.017, 06.002,
08.006
77
Gomes AC
05.021
Gomes BS
04.052
Gomes CR
04.041
Gomes FV
03.001
Gomes JPM
15.005
Gomes MF
04.053, 13.010
Gomes PR
01.009
Gomes SM
06.033
Gómez-Betancur I
09.063
Gonçales T
03.010
Gonçalves ACB
09.060
Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque CF 04.007
González RH
04.011
Goulart G
04.025, 04.056
Graham G
04.026
Graham GJ
04.013
Graton ME
06.031, 06.032
Gregório LE
09.023
Gressler LT
09.016
Grisotto MAG
04.021, 04.035, 05.005
Groban L
06.004
Guerino CB
02.010
Guerra FS
01.003
Guerrini R
03.003
Guimaraes DA
06.014, 06.021
Guimarães E
13.014
Guimarães FS
03.001
Guimarães FV
04.002
Guimarães JA
09.057
Guimarães Junior BS
09.059
Guimarães LD
04.040
Gusmão AB
06.024
Guterres SS
04.041
H
Habiel DM
Hamann FR
Han SW
Hayashi MAF
Headland SE
Heinzmann B
Heinzmann BM
Henriques-Pons A
Hermans E
Hessel AT
Hinton BT
Hocayen PAS
Hogaboam CM
Hohmann MS
Holanda VAD
Hyslop S
08.002
09.041
02.001
09.008
04.018
09.061
09.016
01.018
01.001
02.006,
01.015,
02.012,
08.002
08.002
03.003
01.011,
09.030,
02.016
07.003
03.008
04.032, 09.025, 09.029,
09.036, 09.038, 09.048
I
Inoue BR
Insuella DBR
Issy AC
Iwamoto RD
Izolan JS
09.029, 09.030
04.028
03.001
04.033, 07.002, 11.012, 13.011
11.005, 11.006
J
Jain AK
Januário AGF
Jesse AC
Jesus FN
Joca SRL
Jones HD
Jorge CO
Junior FSG
Junior JGD
Junior JSC
78
05.032
09.049
02.003, 02.004, 02.006, 02.016
06.029
03.006
04.005
05.010
06.012, 06.023
08.004
09.055
Jurkiewicz A
Jurkiewicz NH
01.013, 06.002, 06.006, 15.004
01.013
K
Kanashiro A
KanashiroA
Kanazawa LKS
Karuppusamy A
Kassuya CAL
Katrina MM
Kawamoto EM
Kiguti LR
Kimura K
Kinoshita PF
Kist LW
Klein A
Klug RJ
Ko GM
Köche EM
Kuster RM
Kwasniewski FH
04.013
04.034
02.012, 02.018, 03.008
13.012
06.005
05.017
01.002, 02.013, 02.015, 02.022
07.001
03.010
01.002, 02.015
10.005
04.037
05.005
02.001
02.016
05.021
09.040
L
Lacchini R
Lamana SMS
Lamha APSF
Landgraf MA
Landgraf RG
Landim-Barros T
Landman G
Landucci ECT
Lapa AJ
Latuf-Filho P
Laureano JV
Leal ICR
Leandro KC
Leão RM
Ledo PBO
Leite AR
Leite CAVG
Leite JA
Lellis-Santos C
Lemos LIC
Lemos LM
Lemos LMS
Lemos M
Lemos VS
Lenfers BT
Lenz QF
Leódido ACM
León F
Lima AB
Lima CAA
LIma CKF
Lima DJ
Lima DMF
Lima FF
Lima GM
Lima GRM
Lima GS
Lima JB
Lima KM
Lima LM
Lima PDL
Lima-Araújo KG
Lima-Filho ACM
Lima-Júnior RCP
12.001,
04.057
05.005
04.019,
04.042
04.019,
04.042
09.010
09.020
04.033,
06.016,
10.002,
11.013,
09.005
11.004
02.007
06.028,
01.009
04.011
02.015
01.009
07.006,
09.044
09.058
09.056
06.001
04.018
02.004
09.037
09.063
13.004
09.042
05.014,
09.035
11.005,
04.038
04.029,
08.005,
04.050,
04.011
09.031
04.001,
11.008
06.025
04.029,
08.012
04.011,
04.062
12.002
04.020, 04.023, 04.024,
04.020, 04.023, 04.024,
13.011
09.020
10.004
11.014, 11.015
06.030
09.043
05.019, 05.028
11.013, 11.014, 11.015
08.012
08.015
09.015
13.007
04.030, 08.003, 08.004,
04.049, 04.050, 04.052,
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Lima-Landman MTR
Liszbinski RB
Lívero FAR
Lobo BW
Locati M
Lock G
Lock GA
Longhi Balbinot DT
Longhini AL
Lopes CDH
Lopes EM
Lopes LB
Lopes LGF
Lopes MTP
Lopes-Pires ME
Lorenzetti R
Lourenço ELB
Lubaczeuski C
Lucena TO
Luiz AP
Luiz-Ferreira A
Luz TE
06.016,
13.005
08.019
05.014
04.013
11.002
11.006,
05.017
13.002
04.062
05.031
04.046
06.012,
04.037,
04.025,
09.029,
06.011,
13.011
04.034
02.009
09.002
09.018
09.020
04.057,
05.035,
05.018,
04.030,
08.005,
05.023,
04.051,
15.003
06.010,
05.007
09.055
06.010,
04.027,
04.007
13.010
04.012
04.034,
02.009
09.002
02.003,
11.008
01.011,
06.036
09.060
09.057
04.025,
14.001
01.002
09.001
09.049
04.004,
05.010
02.011
03.005
09.031
13.012
04.001
06.028
04.059
12.001
04.018
04.054,
09.058,
11.007
08.018
03.004
04.060, 05.032, 05.034,
05.036
05.030
08.012
09.033, 09.053
05.027
11.010
11.011
06.023
04.047
15.001
09.038
09.003, 09.021
Macedo EMA
Macêdo WBS
Machado FDF
Machado GDB
Machado ID
Machado IR
Machado NT
Machado RR
Maciel JS
Maciel PMP
Magalhães DA
Magalhães NS
Maia JGS
Maj R
Malvar DC
Manjavachi MN
Manzo LPB
Marafiga JR
Maranhão RC
Marcelino EP
Marcinkiewicz C
Marcolin LSA
Marcon R
Marcondes S
Marcos RL
Marcourakis T
Maria-Ferreira D
Mariano LNB
Markus RP
Marques ACS
Marques AM
Marques GLM
Marques VFP
Martin DTO
Martin MA
Martinez JE
Martinez RM
Martins ACP
Martins DF
Martins DTO
Martins HF
Martins JLR
Martins JM
Mascarello A
Maso V
Masson CJ
Matias DO
Matos NA
Mattos LIS
Mattson MP
Mazucanti C
Mazulo JCRN
Medeiros DC
Medeiros IA
Medeiros IU
Medeiros JVR
M
Macedo CG
Martins JO
Martins MA
06.024, 06.033
06.024, 06.033, 06.037
08.012
04.040
02.004, 02.006, 02.016
04.032
04.056, 15.001
04.044, 07.007
04.055, 09.018, 09.044,
11.003
Medeiros KCP
Medeiros MA
Meira CS
Meira KV
Melgarejo A
Mello CF
Melo AT
Melo B
Melo DS
Melo MCC
Melo MP
Melo PA
Melo PH
Mendes JA
Mendes SJF
Mendes-Junior LG
Mendes-Neto JM
Mendonça GRA
Menegatti CF
Menegatti R
Mermelstein C
Mestriner FLAC
Meyer-Fernandes JR
Mezzomo NJ
Mielcke TR
Milanesi LH
Minassa VS
Miranda ALP
Miranda JR
Miranda-Ferreira R
Miyajima F
Miyoshi E
Mizokami SS
Mónica FZ
Monte FM
Monteiro Neto V
Monteiro-Machado M
Montes GC
Moraes JA
Moraes TMP
Moraes WP
Moreira GCP
Moreira MP
Moreno SE
Morioka CY
Moro RP
Moscoso JR
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
01.004,
01.014,
04.009,
04.028,
08.010,
10.005,
13.002
02.004
05.013,
04.037
11.007
01.002,
01.010
04.039
04.059
06.009,
06.037
03.003
04.029,
09.017,
09.055
07.006,
07.006,
04.022
09.043
09.025
02.003,
02.016,
04.062
05.006,
09.023
05.008
06.010,
09.032,
04.013,
04.031
04.021,
06.009,
06.033
10.004
09.050
01.001,
01.003
04.045
04.006
13.008,
10.005,
02.006,
03.005
05.013,
05.028
09.012
01.013,
09.018,
02.012
04.017,
06.013,
01.008
04.035,
09.032
06.004
06.036,
04.043
04.043,
04.031
13.008
09.050
14.001
01.006
07.002
04.015
04.002, 04.007, 04.008,
04.010, 04.012, 04.026,
04.038, 04.041, 08.001,
09.035
10.006
05.019
02.013
06.010, 06.024, 06.033,
08.003, 08.011, 08.013,
09.019, 09.037, 09.039,
09.043
09.043
02.004, 02.006, 02.014,
09.041
05.010
06.033
09.046
04.061
04.035, 05.005
06.033
01.008
15.002
10.006
02.014, 02.016
05.014, 05.019, 05.021,
15.004
09.058
04.059
07.001
05.005, 09.054
09.057
15.003
79
Moura AL
Moura CFG
Moura RS
Munhoz CD
Muniz HA
Muniz JAPC
Muniz JJ
Muscara MN
Muscará MN
Musial DC
Muylaert FF
Muzilli A
Muzitano MF
06.035
09.062
09.009
02.015
04.049,
11.008
12.001
08.016
04.003,
05.020,
08.017
01.013
09.007,
05.035
09.005
04.050, 04.062
04.036, 04.046, 05.005,
05.026, 06.022, 06.029,
11.001
N
Nader HB
Naffah-Mazzacoratti MG
Naime ACA
Nakamune AC
Nakao LS
Napimoga MH
Nardi GM
Nascimento AA
Nascimento AM
Nascimento APC
Nascimento AS
Nascimento DC
Nascimento FC
Nascimento JLM
Nascimento Jr EB
Nascimento NRF
Nascimento OA
Nascimento RF
Nascimento SM
Nascimento SR
Nascimento-Viana JB
Nazareth NJ
Negro-Dellacqua M
Neto A
Neto EAS
Neto PRP
Neves G
Neves GA
Neves JS
Neves SJ
Nicolau LAD
Nicoletti NF
Niero R
Nin MS
Nobre YTDA
Noël F
Nogueira FM
Nogueira KM
Nogueira TA
Nogueira-Pedro A
Nolasco EL
Nouailhetas VLA
Nunes FPB
Nunes IKC
Nunes RJ
04.044
02.002
04.025,
06.032
06.009
04.057,
09.049
09.059
09.001,
04.057
15.005
04.061
10.004
04.053,
05.007
06.012,
05.022
08.005,
06.037
01.013
01.005
02.011
09.031
01.007
06.029
04.062
13.009
02.011
04.009
04.006
08.011,
05.002
04.051,
11.010
02.021
12.001
01.001,
02.005,
02.001,
09.017,
09.046,
09.040
01.004
09.060
04.015
04.001
10.005,
04.056
04.060, 05.032, 05.034
09.011
13.003, 13.006
06.023
08.015, 09.033, 09.053
08.013, 09.019
08.009, 09.013, 09.049,
01.005, 01.007, 01.008,
10.003
09.020
09.019, 09.037
15.005
10.006
O
Ognibene DT
Okinga A
Oliveira AC
Oliveira AP
Oliveira CC
80
09.009
09.009
06.009
05.031, 09.015, 09.017
05.009
Oliveira DF
Oliveira DR
Oliveira ECP
Oliveira FA
Oliveira FFB
Oliveira FL
Oliveira GH
Oliveira HD
Oliveira JP
Oliveira JRJM
Oliveira MG
Oliveira MTP
Oliveira NCL
Oliveira NNPM
Oliveira NS
Oliveira PEC
Oliveira PR
Oliveira RCM
Oliveira RG
Oliveira SHP
Oliveira T
Oliveira TS
Oliveira-Fusaro MCG
Oliveira-Paula GH
Oliveria WP
Olivon VC
Olsen PC
Orellana AMM
Oshima CTF
Osorio E
09.042
08.018
04.043
04.052,
09.039
09.046
06.017
05.029
08.017
08.007
07.002
08.001,
11.008
09.012
04.041
02.007
06.030
04.052
09.018,
04.058,
09.043
08.018
05.006,
06.014,
09.031
04.045
04.009
01.002,
09.062
09.063
05.018, 05.030
08.010
09.058
09.010
05.010, 05.012
06.015, 12.002
02.015
P
Pacífico DM
Pacini ESA
Paiva IC
Paiva KV
Palma EC
Palombo P
Panunto PC
Pão CRR
Pascual R
Passos FFB
Patricio ES
Paula TD
Paulo LL
Pedrazzi JFC
Pelizari M
Pena-Garcia M
Pereira AAF
Pereira BB
Pereira CA
Pereira CS
Pereira DMS
Pereira JA
Pereira JG
Pereira MBM
Pereira PJS
Pereira PSJ
Pereira SC
Pereira TCS
Pereira TS
Pereira-Marcelino E
Peres RS
Perez AC
Pericole FV
Perretti M
Peruzzo MM
Pessoa MMB
Pessoa TO
Petreanu M
04.029,
01.006,
05.005
02.008
11.013,
02.007
01.011,
04.009
06.025
05.031
02.009
06.026
08.005
03.001
05.006
15.004
06.032
01.011,
06.003,
04.033,
04.021
04.031
04.026
13.001
05.027
05.023
06.034
09.012
13.009
09.036
04.061
05.009
13.002
04.010,
09.049
09.053
06.023
04.051,
08.011, 08.013, 09.019
01.017, 08.006
11.014, 11.015
04.032, 09.029, 09.030
04.032
06.008
13.011
04.018
09.013, 11.010
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Piauilino CA
Pimenta AMC
Pinheiro LC
Pinho-Ribeiro FA
Pinto AC
Pinto DP
Pinto JEBP
Piovezan AP
Pires LC
Pires-Lapa MA
Pisano Dias ASES
Pissinati L
Planeta CS
Pohlmann AR
Pompeu TET
Portella RL
Porto GP
Potje SR
Prado CM
Prado FP
Prando TBL
Prevatto JP
Pritchard DM
Pupo AS
05.018,
13.013
06.014,
06.020,
04.017,
06.004
11.007
09.012
04.018
09.016
04.004
06.016
11.012
02.007
04.041
01.001,
06.017,
02.014
06.031,
06.034
06.034
06.011,
04.007
09.044
01.012,
05.031
06.015, 06.017, 06.018,
06.021
04.059, 05.001, 05.017
01.008
06.018, 06.020
06.032
09.003, 09.021
07.001
Q
Queiroz DPS
Queiroz FFSN
Queiroz Santos GC
Queiroz-Santos GC
Quintas LEM
Quirino ZGM
04.058
04.030, 04.039
13.006
13.003
01.007, 10.003
08.015
R
Rae GA
Rafael PA
Raffin R
Raffin RP
Rambo LM
Randazzo-Moura P
Rates S
Raymondi J
Rech VC
Reckziegel P
Reis Filho AC
Remedios CRM
Rendeiro MM
Rennó AL
Renovato-Martins M
Reschke CR
Resende AC
Resende M
Resende RR
Rezende AA
Ribeiro CA
Ribeiro CM
Ribeiro DA
Ribeiro FAP
Ribeiro MC
Ribeiro NBS
Ribeiro RA
Ribeiro RB
Ribeiro RCL
Ribeiro RT
Ribeiro TP
Ribeiro-Filho HV
Rigoni VLS
Rios JPP
Riske K
Rist J
Rizzi E
Rocha AD
Rocha APM
Rocha BA
Rocha BR
Rocha EV
Rocha LGP
Rocha MR
Rocha MS
Rocha T
Rodrigues LJ
Rodrigues G
Rodrigues JQD
Rodrigues L
Rodrigues MAP
Rodrigues PJ
Rodrigues RL
Rodrigues S
Rodrigues SA
Rodrigues-Simioni L
Rogez HLG
Rojas-Muscoso JA
Romeiro LAS
Romero TRL
Rosa SIG
Rossaneis AC
Rossato MF
Rossoni LV
Rubin MA
Ruiz ALTG
Russo RC
11.002
06.021
05.029
09.009
04.016,
09.026
09.023
09.012
10.004
09.015
04.031
13.005
06.036
06.002,
04.003,
09.029,
04.016,
09.028,
07.004
11.004
05.016,
09.048,
09.056
11.012
01.005
05.009
04.055
05.017
09.041
01.007
02.014,
15.003
04.013
09.028
06.006
04.036, 04.046, 05.026
09.030, 09.038
09.024, 09.026, 09.027,
10.001
05.024, 11.001
09.051, 09.052
09.041
S
05.008
09.024
11.009
13.005
02.006,
09.051,
11.002
05.003
11.009,
03.007,
05.018
13.004
10.003
09.029,
06.036
02.004
09.009,
10.004
13.013
09.043
07.001
01.015,
09.062
09.062
04.031
04.008
04.011,
04.062,
09.059
09.021
13.001
06.009,
04.011
09.040,
13.013
04.048
02.016
09.052
13.008, 15.002
03.009
10.002, 10.004
09.047
07.003, 07.005
04.049, 04.050, 04.052,
09.039
06.024
09.060
Sá YAPJ
Saad ATO
Sala T
Salas CE
Sales IRP
Sales PAB
Sampaio KN
Sampaio TB
Sanchez ER
Sandrim VC
Sannomya P
Sanny CG
Santana DG
Santana DMG
Santana PHDAS
Santi L
Santin JR
Santo IP
Santoro T
Santos AK
Santos AM
Santos BLR
Santos CF
Santos CFF
Santos DFS
Santos DS
Santos GCQ
Santos GHR
Santos GJ
Santos IB
Santos IM
Santos IMSP
Santos JA
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
01.014
13.002
01.010
04.047
08.005,
09.053
09.019
03.005
06.012,
06.034
12.003
04.015
09.051
08.016
09.001
02.008
09.057
04.051,
11.010
13.002
04.028
13.013
09.059
05.019
06.012,
09.023
05.010,
05.022
13.010
03.002
01.009
09.009,
09.031
05.030
02.017
08.015, 09.022, 09.033,
06.023
08.009, 09.006, 09.013,
06.023
05.012
09.047
81
Santos KT
Santos LA
Santos LRSO
Santos MEP
Santos PF
Santos SHS
Santos SL
Santos WC
Santos-Oliveira A
Sasse A
Saturnino-Oliveira J
Savignon T
Sawaya ACHF
Scalzilli PA
Scavone C
Schenka AA
Schenka NGM
Schezaro-Ramos R
Schini-Kerth V
Schmidt TP
Schwarting RKW
Seed M
Segat GC
Serra MF
Sheridan H
Shimada K
Signor C
Silote GP
Silva AKM
Silva AS
Silva BL
Silva BLR
Silva BV
Silva CF
Silva CLM
Silva CMS
Silva CR
Silva DC
Silva DM
Silva DMD
Silva DS
Silva EBS
Silva EJR
Silva ET
Silva FH
Silva FL
Silva FS
Silva FV
Silva GGO
Silva ICV
Silva IS
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
Silva
82
JDP
JJM
JLV
JPN
KO
KP
LI
LL
LM
MA
MM
MS
NKGT
NLC
PMR
04.003,
04.019
07.006
09.015
06.024
05.009
04.038
05.018,
08.016
09.056
09.032
11.001
04.033,
05.025
01.002,
02.022
10.002,
10.002
09.052
06.009
04.036,
03.008
04.018
02.009
04.008,
09.056
04.005
02.014
03.006
09.022
15.003
02.017
04.035
06.004
05.015
01.005,
04.049,
05.003
09.055
08.018
11.007
04.004,
04.043,
01.015,
08.001,
07.001,
09.060
07.006,
04.052
09.050
09.005
04.029,
08.012,
02.001,
09.056
09.040,
04.038
04.011
01.012,
13.012
09.061
08.019
05.005
04.019,
04.031
02.017
05.021
01.009,
04.007,
04.036
05.030, 06.025
13.011
01.010, 02.013, 02.015,
10.004
04.046
04.009, 04.038
06.025
04.050
06.031, 06.032
15.003
07.003, 07.005
08.010
07.004
09.043
08.003, 08.004, 08.011,
08.013
02.002
09.060, 14.001
07.001
04.023, 04.042, 08.003
01.014, 04.001, 04.002,
04.008, 04.009, 04.010,
Silva PS
Silva RF
Silva RO
Silva RR
Silva RV
Silva TAF
Silva TF
Silva TV
Silva VA
Silva WB
Silva-Comar FMS
Silva-Filho JC
Silva-Filho SE
Silva-Fillho SE
Silva-Junior E D
Silva-Junior ED
Silvério-Mendes CB
Simas NK
Sinigaglia-Coimbra R
Siqueira AA
Siqueira MVA
Smaal A
Snatos MRV
Soares AG
Soares de Moura R
Soares F
Soares FRC
Soares MA
Soares MBP
Soares PMG
Sobral MV
Sobrinho AP
Socca EAR
Somensi LB
Sonego F
Souccar C
Sousa DP
Sousa FBM
Sousa NA
Sousa NC
Sousa PVV
Sousa RV
Sousa-Neto BP
Souza ACA
Souza Brito ARM
Souza CP
Souza DO
Souza EFJ
Souza ET
Souza Filho OP
Souza FM
Souza GEP
Souza INO
Souza LKM
Souza
Souza
Souza
Souza
Souza
Souza
Souza
Souza
Souza
MAV
MFV
MHLP
MM
NRP
PC
PS
TB
VB
04.012,
08.001,
12.002
04.034,
08.004,
02.005
05.014,
06.010,
13.007
04.010
09.060
11.008
04.016
09.015
04.016,
10.001
09.026
06.002
06.006
06.013
05.021
02.001
03.005
04.037
09.029
09.015
04.003,
09.047
10.004
03.006
05.021
04.022,
09.039
07.006,
09.045
09.002
08.008,
09.013
04.013
02.001,
04.052,
04.029,
09.019,
04.039,
09.017,
09.025,
02.002
09.012
04.052
08.017
09.002
10.004
03.004
09.011
04.001,
04.022
09.015
05.008
13.009
04.029,
09.017,
09.009
09.022
09.039
03.006
04.049
10.002
04.018
09.050
10.002,
04.026, 04.028, 04.041,
08.010, 09.035
04.040
09.039, 09.055
05.019, 05.028, 09.054
06.024, 06.033, 06.037
09.024, 09.027, 09.028,
06.022
05.022
08.005
08.009, 09.004, 09.006,
02.002,
05.018,
08.011,
09.037,
08.003,
09.019,
09.029
06.016,
05.030
08.013,
09.039,
08.011,
09.037
09.020
09.017,
09.055
08.013,
04.010, 04.041
08.003, 08.011, 08.013,
09.019, 09.037
10.004
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Spadari RC
Spall S
Spessoto D
Steimbach VMB
Stilhano RS
Strauch MA
Stroka A
Sudo RT
Sulczewski FB
Sunahara KKS
06.035
09.016
06.005
09.006
02.001
09.032
09.025
06.004, 13.007
13.005
04.015
T
Takore P
Tamascia ML
Tamura EK
Tanae MM
Tanus JE
Tanus-Santos JE
Tavares EBG
Tavares JF
Tavares-Henriques MS
Teixeira DF
Teixeira FM
Teixeira LCR
Teixeira MA
Teixeira MM
Teixeira RGS
Teixeira SA
Teles RHG
Teles YCF
Tella SOC
Temp FR
Terroso T
Tessaro FHG
Thimoteo DS
Thumé L
Tirado IS
Tirloni ACS
Tirloni CAS
Toledo Jr JC
Tomaz MA
Tonin TD
Torre AD
Torres Huaco FD
Torres RA
Torres RC
Torres TC
Torres-Huaco FD
Tosta CL
Tostes RC
Trachez MM
Trentin PG
Tributino JLM
Troiano JA
04.021
09.036,
07.007
09.020
06.017
06.014,
06.021,
04.014
08.015
09.032
08.017
04.040
04.047
04.049
04.013,
06.025,
04.003,
06.022,
08.012
09.022
06.014
02.003,
04.041
01.004
01.015,
02.010
04.058
09.003
06.011
06.018
09.032
04.051,
15.003
04.032
06.024,
04.007,
06.019
01.011,
03.006
04.045,
13.007
04.010
05.021
06.031,
09.048
06.015, 06.018, 06.020,
06.027, 12.001, 12.002
Vanderlinde FA
VanderlindeFA
Vargas APC
Vasconcelos AR
Vasconcelos PCP
Vasconcelos WP
Vassalo J
Vaucher RA
Vaz ALL
Vaz DBR
Vecchia DD
Velázquez-Martínez CA
Velozo ES
Veneziani RCS
Veras RC
Verri Jr WA
Viegas Jr C
Vieira LQ
Vieira MAR
Vieira RP
Viel TA
Vilalva KH
Villarreal CF
04.040
04.034
09.016
01.002
06.005
06.009
10.004
11.009
05.008
04.020
02.012
04.016,
04.022
09.056
06.037
04.005,
05.017,
13.009
15.003
09.057
09.040
01.002
06.017,
04.022,
10.001
04.017, 04.059, 05.001,
05.033, 08.002
06.020
05.022
W
04.026
09.046
04.036, 04.046, 05.020,
06.029, 08.017
02.006, 02.016
07.003
Wanderley CWS
Watanabe PS
Wenceslau CF
Wendler E
Werner MF
Werner MFP
Whiteman M
Wiirzler LAM
Wiirzler LAW
Wong DVT
Wood M
Wood ME
04.011,
09.001
06.029
02.012,
05.015
05.004,
04.036,
04.016,
09.028
10.001
04.011,
04.046,
04.036
04.049, 04.050, 04.052
03.008
08.019, 09.001, 09.011
04.046, 05.020
09.024, 09.026, 09.027,
04.050, 04.052
05.020
X
Xavier RF
Ximenes VF
11.010
06.037
04.028
09.034
06.003, 06.008
08.010
06.031, 06.032
Y
Yates JR
Yshii LM
09.057
01.002, 01.010
Z
Zamuner SR
Zangeronimo MG
Zanotto CZ
Zapata-Sudo G
Zarpelon AC
09.040
09.012
04.045, 06.003, 06.008
06.004, 13.007
05.033
06.032
U
Uchida NS
Umpierrez L
04.016, 09.024, 09.026, 09.027,
09.028, 10.001
03.010
V
van den Wijngaard RM
09.001
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
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84
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
85
86
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
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88
47th Brazilian Congress of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
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